Photo and Video Chronology – Kīlauea – May 14, 2021

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Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; Halema‘uma‘u west vent erupts lava into the lava lake, which was 229 m (751 ft) deep this morning, May 14. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor the eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

HVO scientists collect detailed data to assess hazards and understand how the eruption is evolving at Kīlauea's summit, all of which are shared with the National Park Service and emergency managers. Access to this hazardous area is by permission from, and in coordination with, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

 

May 13, 2021 — Kīlauea

Kīlauea summit overflight

 

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists conducted an overflight of Kīlauea's summit on the morning of May 13

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists conducted an overflight of Kīlauea's summit on the morning of May 13. Though no incandescence was visible during the overflight, field crews monitoring the ongoing eruption in Halema‘uma‘u from the ground observed a small amount of fluid lava on the surface later in the day. In this aerial photo, the west vent area is in the lower right. USGS image by K. Mulliken.

(Public domain.)

More of Kīlauea's lava lake surface in Halema‘uma‘u crater has solidified in recent weeks, evident in this May 13 aerial view

More of Kīlauea's lava lake surface in Halema‘uma‘u crater has solidified in recent weeks, as is evident in this aerial view taken yesterday, May 13. However, gas emissions and small patches of active lava on the surface indicate that the eruption continues. Most recently, gas emissions were measured as 225 tonnes per day on May 12. The bluish-tinged plume of volcanic gas can be seen emitting from Halema‘uma‘u's west vent complex (upper left) in this photo. USGS image by K. Mulliken.

(Public domain.)

A low, oblique aerial view of the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea's summit

A low, oblique aerial view of the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea's summit (upper right) taken during an overflight on May 13. The area of active lava has slowly been decreasing in recent weeks, but not all of the lava lake surface has stagnated. Portions of the lake surface continue to resurface via a process called foundering. During foundering, the dense solidified crust on the surface of the lava lake sinks into the molten material below, resulting in parts of the lava lake being resurfaced. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists observed this process occurring in multiple locations of the lake surface later in the day. USGS photo by K. Mulliken.

(Public domain.)

Near Kīlauea Visitor Center, the Ha‘akulamanu trail within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park passes through the Sulphur Banks area

Near Kīlauea Visitor Center, the Ha‘akulamanu trail within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park passes through the Sulphur Banks area. Fumaroles in this area emit different sulfur gases, including sulfur dioxide (SO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and are sampled approximately every three months by USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory gas geochemists to track long-term changes in volcanic gas chemistry at Kīlauea. USGS photo by K. Mulliken.

(Public domain.)

 

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake

The eruption in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea, continues

The eruption in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea, continues. Gas emissions, last measured on May 12, were 225 tonnes per day. This photo, taken on May 13, shows the bluish-tinged plume of volcanic gas being emitted from the western vent complex within Halema‘uma‘u crater. USGS image by K. Mulliken.

(Public domain.)

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists observed fluid lava on the surface of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists observed fluid lava on the surface of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea, while monitoring the eruption on May 13. Two areas of ponded lava exhibited foundering, during which more-dense solidified crust sinks into the lava lake and is replaced by less-dense liquid lava from below. This photo shows the northern ponded area foundering at approximately 1:45 p.m. HST. USGS image by K. Mulliken.

(Public domain.)

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists observed fluid lava on the surface of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists observed fluid lava on the surface of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea, while monitoring the eruption on May 13. Two areas of ponded lava exhibited foundering, during which more-dense solidified crust sinks into the lava lake and is replaced by less-dense liquid lava from below. This photo shows the southern ponded area foundering at approximately 2:15 p.m. HST. USGS image by K. Mulliken.

(Public domain.)

The area of solidified crust at the surface of Halema‘uma‘u's lava lake, has been growing over the past several weeks

The area of solidified crust at the surface of Halema‘uma‘u's lava lake, at the summit of Kīlauea, has been growing over the past several weeks. This may make it seem that the eruption is over but lava continues to be supplied to the lava lake from below. With National Park Service permission, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists observe this eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. On May 13, geologists observed three small areas of active lava ponding on the surface, visible in this photo. The continuous laser rangefinder at the summit of Kīlauea measures an area in the upper right portion of this photo. USGS image by K. Mulliken.

(Public domain.)