Responding to Alaska's largest seabird die-off at Katmai National Park & Preserve

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In 2015 and 2016, hundreds of thousands of dead and dying Common Murres washed ashore in Alaska. In March of 2016, biologists with the National Park Service, US Fish & Wildlife Service, and US Geological Survey set out to Katmai National Park & Preserve to document the number of dead and dying seabirds there.

This video explores Alaska's largest seabird die-off and the survey effort to document its extent at Katmai.

Video: Responding to Alaska's largest seabird die-off at Katmai National Park & Preserve

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Date published: August 3, 2018
Status: Active

Seabirds and Forage Fish Ecology

Alaska's coastal and offshore waters provide foraging habitat for an estimated 100 million birds comprising more than 90 different species; from loons and seaducks that nest inland, to petrels and puffins that breed on islands off shore. All these birds depend on the sea to provide a wide variety of food types— from clams, crabs and urchins nearshore— to krill, forage fish, and squid offshore...