Virginia and West Virginia Water Science Center

Filter Total Items: 43
West Virginia Real-time Precipitation Network
Date Published: November 8, 2017
Status: Active

The Virginia and West Virginia Real-Time Precipitation Network application shows current and cumulative rainfall total for precipitation sites in Virginia and West Virginia. The application includes real-time precipitation radar image to overlay from National Weather Service.

Real-time Precipitation Network:  ...

Virginia Water-Monitoring-Site Mapper
Date Published: November 7, 2017
Status: Active

The Water-Monitoring-Site Mapper is an interactive map of Virginia and West Virginia water-monitoring-site locations from the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS). View and download surface water, groundwater, and water quality monitoring data for active sites. The functionality includes query, select, tabular display by...

Sunset at Big Meadows in Shenandoah National Park
Date Published: October 21, 2017
Status: Active

Climate change raises concern that risks of hydrological drought may be increasing. We estimate hydrological drought probabilities for rivers and streams in the United States (U.S.) using maximum likelihood logistic regression (MLLR). Streamflow data from winter months are used to estimate the chance of hydrological drought during summer months. Daily streamflow data collected from 9,144...

Roanoke River Valley
Date Published: October 8, 2017
Status: Active

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), is monitoring the water quality of multiple high-priority streams where natural gas pipeline crossings have been proposed. The purpose of the monitoring effort is to collect baseline water-quality data and, if the pipeline construction is approved, to monitor water quality in these...

Virginia and West Virginia office locations
Date Published: July 12, 2017
Status: Active

The Virginia and West Virginia Water Science Center has science and field offices in Virginia and West Virginia. Follow the directions to our offices.

USGS: Science for a changing world
Date Published: July 11, 2017

USGS WaterAlert service sends e-mail or text (SMS) messages when certain parameters exceed user-definable thresholds for any USGS real-time stream or raingage, water-quality, or groundwater monitoring site.

USGS WaterNow allows to send a text or...

West Virginia Real-time Precipitation Network
Date Published: July 11, 2017

These interactive maps show current and cumulative rainfall total for precipitation sites in Virginia and West Virginia.  Map provides real-time precipitation radar image to overlay from National Weather Service.

Visit Real-Time Precipitation Web site for: Virginia  |  ...

USGS
Date Published: July 10, 2017
Status: Active

For more information and data, contact the Virginia and West Virginia Water Science Center:

• Information Requests

Image of a new benchmark.
Date Published: June 24, 2017
Status: Active

The southern Chesapeake Bay region is experiencing land subsidence along with rising sea levels, both of which can contribute to coastal flooding. The rates at which these two processes are occurring are not exactly known. Mapping of land elevation change requires ground-truth survey data at multiple locations that are accurate and precise. With the exception of a few CORS sites that have...

Lick Run concrete lined channel with Mill Mountain in the background
Date Published: June 15, 2017
Status: Active

The U.S. Geological Survey, partnering with the City of Roanoke and Virginia Tech University, are working to monitor the water volume and quality in streams throughout the City of Roanoke. There is currently a single long-term monitoring station, Lick Run, within the city. The objective of this study is to create a model to compute suspended sediment concentrations and loads within the Lick...

Time of Concentration Estimates for Small Watersheds, WV
Date Published: June 13, 2017
Status: Active

Many culverts and other drainage structures in rural West Virginia are located in small streams or valleys draining 100 acres or less. Design of these structures in West Virginia is generally done using discharge estimates made with widely used and well accepted methods. However, these methods require information including flow-segment length and channel geometry that are poorly characterized...