Lidar image of Rocky Ridge and raised shorelines along Lake Tahoe

High-resolution, bare-earth, airborne light detection and ranging (...

Detailed Description

High-resolution, bare-earth, airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) image, looking obliquely northwest into Rocky Ridge. Image units correspond to those of Figure 2: MPa—Miocene-Pliocene andesite lavas and breccias; QPs—Pliocene-Pleistocene lacustrine sediments, locally diatomite-rich; Qb1—older basalt lavas (2.3 Ma); Qtf—0.94 Ma trachyandesite lavas; Qu—undifferentiated, unconsolidated deposits, including till, colluvium, alluvium, and landslide deposits. Lake levels are shown by red lines. Lake level at 2.3 Ma (1975 m) marks transition from subaqueous pillow lavas and pillow breccias below to subaerial lavas of unit Qb1 above. Lake level at 0.94 Ma is at 2085 m elevation and marks transition from subaqueous hydroclastic breccias below to subaerial lavas of unit Qtf above. Distance from Jack Pine Canyon to Rocky Ridge is 800 m.

Details

Image Dimensions: 1061 x 571

Source:


Kortemeirer, W., Calvert, A., Moore, J.G., Schweickert, R., 2018, Pleistocene volcanism and shifting shorelines at Lake Tahoe, California: Geosphere, vol. 14, no. 2, 23 p. doi: 10.1130/GES01551.1.