Hovering Above—UAS’ Role in the 2018 Kīlauea Volcano Eruption Response

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Detailed Description

The 2018 Kīlauea Volcano eruption marked the first time the federal government used Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) to assist in an eruption response in the United States. The UAS were used to survey areas otherwise inaccessible or too hazardous for field crews or manned aircraft, collect multiple types of data, and provide 24/7 real-time situational awareness at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit and lower East Rift Zone. This video includes UAS footage from missions flown on May 21, May 27, June 8, June 13, November 7, and November 8, 2018.
 

Details

Image Dimensions: 1920 x 1080

Date Taken:

Length: 00:04:37

Location Taken: HI, US

Video Credits

Music Scott Holmes, Together We Stand, and Meydn, Tired of Life, from freemusicarchive.org

Transcript

Kīlauea Volcano

Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) assists in the 2018 Kīlauea Volcano eruption response

Video from the U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

Video from May 21, 2018, June 13, 2018, November 7, 2018

UAS were used to conduct photogrammetry surveys to create very-high-resolution topographic models and orthophoto mosaics.

Video from November 7, 2018

 

UAS were used to record oblique videos for hazards assessment and outreach.

Video from May 27, 2018

 

UAS were used to live stream video to emergency operations centers in Hilo and Honolulu to support management of emergency public safety situations through real-time, on-demand situational awareness.

Video from May 27, 2018

 

UAS were used to collect repeat nadir videos over sections of the lava channel to support eruption rate measurements.

Video from June 8, 2018

 

UAS were used to monitor volcanic gas emission rates, composition and concentrations.

Video from November 8, 2018

 

The 2018 Kīlauea eruption marked the first time the federal government used Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) to assist in an eruption response in the U.S. UAS provided the ability to survey areas otherwise inaccessible or too hazardous for field crews or manned aircraft, collect multiple types of data, and provide 24/7 real-time situational awareness.

An assortment of rotor and fixed-wing UAS and sensors were used to monitor the eruption at both the summit and lower East Rift Zone (LERZ).

Throughout the eruption UAS surveys provided a stream of quick-turnaround data products to scientists for quantitative use, and to emergency managers for situational awareness. UAS were used during the eruption to: (1) monitor volcanic gas emission rates, composition and concentrations; (2) collect repeat nadir videos over sections of the lava channel to support eruption rate measurements; (3) record oblique videos for hazards assessment and outreach; (4) live stream video to emergency operations centers in Hilo and Honolulu to support management of emergency public safety situations through real-time, on-demand situational awareness; and (5) conduct photogrammetry surveys to create very-high-resolution topographic models and orthophoto mosaics.

These data were used to monitor flow advance rates and erupted volume and provided updated topography for flow inundation modeling in the LERZ.  A time-series of DEMs of the summit captured caldera growth, including rate and volume of collapse, and orthophotos were used to map out fractures and ballistic fall fields.

Video by the U.S. Geological Survey and Office of Aviation Services, Department of the Interior, with support from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park.

 

Music Scott Holmes, Together We Stand, and Meydn, Tired of Life, from freemusicarchive.org

 

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