ModelMuse: Irregular Layers in MODFLOW

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Detailed Description

This video shows how to use ModelMuse to specify layers in MODFLOW that vary in elevation.
 

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Image Dimensions: 800 x 600

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Length: 00:04:19

Location Taken: US

Transcript

The letters "USGS" and the words "Science for a Changing World" appear in green and fade to black.
This video shows how to specify layers in MODFLOW that vary in elevation.
When you first start a MODFLOW model in ModelMuse, you will typically have a model that has uniform layers.
Here's one way to change layers so that they are no longer uniform in elevation.
I'll draw a polygon on the top view of the model around some of the cells.
That I'll change the number of Z formulas to zero.
This must always be set to zero when you want to use an object to affect the value of a dataset that defines the elevation of the grid.
Note that "Set values of enclosed cells" is checked.
On that datasets tab I'll set the formula for Model_Top to 5. and click OK
On the front view the model, you can see that the layer top is no longer uniform.
Now, I'll create a point object and use it to set the elevation of single cell. 
However first all change this 2 to 0.
Now the new object will automatically have it's number of Z formulas set to zero
I create a point object
You can see that the number for all the Z formulas is zero.
Note also that "Set values of intersected cells" is checked.
On the datasets tab I will set the formula for Model_Top to 10. and click OK.
You can see that the elevation has been changed.
Finally, I'll interpolate between several points to set additional elevations.
First I select "Data|Edit Datasets..." and select the Model_Top dataset... change its interpolation method to Nearest_Point.
click OK
I'll create a point object
I uncheck  "Set values of intersected cells" and check "Set values of cells by interpolation." on the Data Sets tab, I'll change the formula to -5.
The elevation has changed again.
Now I'll make another point object over here.
Again I'll sets the value of the cells by interpolation.
In this case, I will set the elevation to 15.
We can see what the top of the grid looks like by clicking the "Show top grid button" and looking at the 3D view.
Another way to view the layer elevation is to click the data visualization button... and select the Model_Top data set.
To see exactly what value is assigned to a cell, select "Data|Show Grid Values"... and then move the cursor over the grid.
The value displayed in the Grid Value dialog box right here will be the value of the cell underneath the cursor.
You can change the elevations by movingsome of the objects around.
Thank you for watching the video.
The letters "USGS" and the words "Science for a Changing World" appear in green.