Oso Landslide Computer Simulations

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A large destructive landslide occurred near Oso, Washington on March 22, 2014. Computer simulations indicate that it could have behaved very differently (with much less mobility and consequent destructiveness) if the ground had been less porous and water-saturated. This video shows the results of two computer simulations. The first simulation shows computed landslide behavior that best matches that observed at Oso. An alternative simulation shows landslide behavior that could have occurred if the water-saturated ground had been slightly less porous. Details on the Oso landslide and these computer simulations are in Landslide mobility and hazards: implications of the 2014 Oso disaster, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 2014 (doi: 10.1016/j.epsl.2014.12.020).

Details

Image Dimensions: 480 x 360

Date Taken:

Length: 00:02:19

Location Taken: WA, US

Transcript

Title: Oso Landslide Computer Simulations
Narration:

A large destructive landslide occurred near
Oso, Washington on March 22, 2014.

Computer simulations indicate that it could
have behaved very differently (with much less

mobility and consequent destructiveness) if
the ground had been less porous and water-saturated.

Results of two simulations follow.

The first simulation shows computed landslide
behavior that best matches that observed at

Oso.

The landslide accelerates rapidly after slope
failure occurs, because the porous, water-saturated

ground liquefies after it fails.

[Oso Landslide Simulation Best Fit]
An alternative simulation shows landslide

behavior that could have occurred if the water-saturated
ground had been slightly less porous.

In this case the failing ground does not liquefy.

The resulting landslide moves relatively slowly
and stops after it travels only about 100

meters.

[Oso Landslide Simulation Best Fit]
Details on the Oso landslide and these computer

simulations are in:
 

Landslide mobility and hazards: implications
of the 2014 Oso disaster, Earth and Planetary

Science Letters, 2014 (doi: 10.1016/j.epsl.2014.12.020)

by R.M.

Iverson1, D.L.

George1, K. Allstadt2, M.E. Reid1, B.D.

Collins1, J.W.

Vallance1,  S.P. Schilling1, J.W.

Godt1, C.M.

Cannon1, C.S.

Magirl1, R.L. Baum1, J.A. Coe1, W.H.

Schulz1, and J.B.

Title: Oso Landslide Computer Simulations
Narration:

A large destructive landslide occurred near
Oso, Washington on March 22, 2014.

Computer simulations indicate that it could
have behaved very differently (with much less

mobility and consequent destructiveness) if
the ground had been less porous and water-saturated.

Results of two simulations follow.

The first simulation shows computed landslide
behavior that best matches that observed at

Oso.
The landslide accelerates rapidly after slope

failure occurs, because the porous, water-saturated
ground liquefies after it fails.

[Oso Landslide Simulation Best Fit]
An alternative simulation shows landslide

behavior that could have occurred if the water-saturated
ground had been slightly less porous.

In this case the failing ground does not liquefy.
The resulting landslide moves relatively slowly

and stops after it travels only about 100
meters.

[Oso Landslide Simulation Best Fit]
Details on the Oso landslide and these computer

simulations are in:
 

Landslide mobility and hazards: implications
of the 2014 Oso disaster, Earth and Planetary

Science Letters, 2014 (doi: 10.1016/j.epsl.2014.12.020)

by R.M. Iverson1, D.L. George1, K. Allstadt2,
M.E. Reid1, B.D. Collins1, J.W. Vallance1,

 S.P. Schilling1, J.W. Godt1, C.M. Cannon1,
C.S. Magirl1, R.L. Baum1, J.A. Coe1, W.H.

Schulz1, and J.B. Bower3
 

1 U.S. Geological Survey, 2 University of
Washington, 3 NOAA National Weather Service

Narration by Richard M. Iverson, Research
Hydrologist

U.S. Geological Survey-Cascades Volcano Observatory
January 2015