USGS Studies Harmful Algal Blooms in New York

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Detailed Description

USGS scientists are studying water-quality conditions and harmful algal blooms—known as HABs—in Owasco, Seneca and Skaneateles lakes in New York. The USGS monitoring effort will provide a better understanding of HAB growth and severity and allow for near instantaneous detection of changing water-quality conditions that might be indicative of HAB development. This will enable state officials, water resource managers, drinking water utilities, the public and others to make more informed decisions on how to deal with HABs and develop mitigation strategies. This collaborative effort, funded by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and the USGS, is in support of the state’s $65 million initiative to aggressively combat HABs in waterbodies across New York.
 

Details

Image Dimensions: 2600 x 1950

Date Taken:

Length: 00:00:55

Location Taken: Geneva, NY, US

Video Credits

 

In collaboration with Jessica Fitzpatrick, Guy Foster and Jennifer Graham with the USGS.
 

Transcript

In New York, the USGS has installed technologically advanced systems to study water quality and harmful algal blooms—known as HABs.

This is in support of the state’s $65 million initiative to aggressively combat HABs across New York.

The new USGS equipment is installed on Owasco, Seneca and Skaneateles lakes.

HABs are a global issue and occur when algae grow out of control and produce harmful and potentially toxic effects.

These blooms can be harmful to humans, animals, pets and aquatic ecosystems, and lead to impacts on the economy.

USGS science provides a better understanding of HAB growth and severity and allows for near instantaneous detection of when the public could be exposed.

The USGS is working with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation to establish this advanced monitoring program.