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Date published: February 8, 2002

Keeping Common Species Common in New York

The USGS announced today that species and habitat data profiles have been completed for New York under the Gap Analysis Program (GAP). The GAP is a scientific method of gathering broad geographic information on biological diversity that contributes to keeping common species common.

Date published: February 6, 2002

Similar Patterns of Ground Water Pollution Found in United States and China

The United States and the People’s Republic of China share a common problem ? elevated nitrate concentrations in water supplies used for drinking water, according to a recently released report by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Date published: February 4, 2002

President's FY 2003 Budget for USGS - Science in Support of Natural Resources and the Nation's Public Lands

 

The President has proposed a budget of $904.0 million for the Interior Department’s U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Fiscal Year 2003. This includes $36.7 million for a government-wide legislative proposal to shift to agencies the full cost of the Civil Service Retirement System and the Federal employee health benefits program for current employees.

Date published: January 30, 2002

University of Utah to Monitor Olympic Earthquakes - Thanks to USGS

University of Utah seismologists will be on duty around-the-clock during the Olympics, armed with a new $1.2 million system so they can quickly supply public safety information if any disruptive earthquakes shake the 2002 Winter Games.

Date published: January 25, 2002

THE "SHIP"ping NEWS - USGS Scientists Launch Earth Shaking Study in the Puget Lowlands

In an effort to understand how future earthquakes will affect the central Puget Sound lowlands, U. S. Geological Survey scientists, working from North Seattle Community College, on January 25 will begin installing 90 seismographs to measure ground shaking throughout the region.

Date published: January 24, 2002

Piping Plovers Have Their Ups and Downs

Dramatic changes have occurred in the distribution and abundance of a threatened and endangered shorebird called the piping plover, according to just-completed census results that U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientist Susan Haig will present, Jan. 23, 2002, at the North American Plover Species at Risk Meeting in Ann Arbor, Mich.

Date published: December 28, 2001

Start the New Year in the Right Direction - USGS Teaches Map and Compass Reading and How to Use Global Positioning System Receivers

New GPS users, or people considering buying a GPS receiver, as well as, hikers, hunters, and other outdoor enthusiasts will benefit from the free workshops offered by the USGS on map reading, compass reading, and using GPS.

Date published: December 20, 2001

USGS Names Michael J. Mac as Director of Columbia Environmental Research Center

The U.S. Geological Survey has named Dr. Michael J. Mac as the new Director of the Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC) in Columbia, Mo.

Date published: December 13, 2001

Melting Glaciers to Methane Gasses

Nearly 300 scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey will present papers and posters describing their earth-science research, during the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), at the Moscone Convention Center in San Francisco, December 10 – 14. 

Date published: December 13, 2001

The Spirit of the Season Seen in the General Grant Sequoia, the Nation's Living Christmas Tree

There is science and there is spirit. Sometimes the two twine at apt times. So it is that, in the spirit of an ancient, but ageless Santa Claus, the General Grant Tree-- officially designated in 1926 as the Nation’s Christmas tree by President Calvin Coolidge -- just keeps getting younger.

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Date published: December 13, 2001

What Goes Around, Comes Around I But When In the Bay Area Earthquake Cycle?

 

Stress changes produced by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake had a profound effect on Bay Area seismicity by dramatically reducing it in the 20th century, according to David Schwartz, of the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, Calif.

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Date published: December 11, 2001

Is Salty Groundwater in South Florida's Future?

Using a time-tested technique in a new way, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have been able to determine how quickly marine groundwater has encroached into South Florida?s inland fresh water aquifers. Charles Holmes will explain the technique and findings at the AGU Annual 2001 Fall Meeting, scheduled for Dec. 10-14 in San Francisco, CA.