River Levels Set Records in Texas: USGS Continues to Monitor Rivers in the State Due to Flooding

Release Date:

Editor’s note: this news release will be updated online with more information on the streamgage records being set in Texas as it becomes available.

Rivers and streams reached record levels as a result of Hurricane Harvey’s rainfall, with about 40 U.S. Geological Survey streamgages measuring record peaks.

“During the peak period of flooding, about 81 streamgages in east and southeast Texas recorded water levels at National Weather Service flood stage,” said Jeff East with the USGS Texas Water Science Center. “All Texas rivers have already crested and have reached their highest levels.”

Immediately after the worst of the storm had passed, USGS hydrologists in Texas and from other parts of the country were deployed to measure high flood flows. The crews are also calibrating and repairing streamgages damaged by the storm to ensure they continue to transmit information in real time to users working to protect lives and property.  

In Texas, the USGS has almost 800 real-time stream, lake, reservoir, precipitation and groundwater stations. The USGS, in cooperation with state, local and federal agencies, operates a nationwide network of more than 8,200 streamgages on inland rivers and streams. These gauges provide real-time data important to the National Weather Service, FEMA, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and other state and local partners involved in issuing flood and evacuation warnings, coordinating emergency responses to communities and operating flood-control reservoirs.

Flooding information and records known so far:

Information on record peaks and flows is still being gathered and is subject to change.

In Texas, provisional data shows new records have been set on the following rivers, streams and bayous:

  • Sabine River
  • Neches River
  • Mud Creek
  • Attoyac Bayou
  • Ayish Bayou
  • Pine Island Bayou
  • Trinity River
  • Menard Creek
  • Cedar Bayou
  • Cypress Creek
  • East Fork San Jacinto River
  • San Jacinto River
  • Buffalo Bayou
  • Middle Yegua Creek
  • Brazos River
  • San Bernard River
  • Colorado River
  • Tres Palacios River
  • Navidad River
  • Gaudalupe River
  • Copana Creek

View current monitoring data for almost 800 USGS real-time stream, lake, reservoir, precipitation and groundwater stations in Texas in context with current weather and hazard conditions at USGS Texas Water Dashboard. Two fully-autonomous Twitter feeds distribute water level and precipitation data during flooding or severe rainfall: @USGS_TexasFlood and @USGS_TexasRain.

To learn more about USGS’ role providing science to decision makers before, during and after Hurricane Harvey, visit the USGS Hurricane Harvey page at https://www.usgs.gov/harvey.

For more information on being prepared for storms go to ready.gov.

USGS scientist David Rodriguez records high water marks from storm surge following Harvey near Corpus Christi, Texas. 
USGS scientist David Rodriguez records high water marks from storm surge following Harvey near Corpus Christi, Texas. (Credit: Kurt Kraske, USGS. Public domain.)
USGS scientist surveying high water marks from storm surge from Hurricane Harvey at Packery Channel near Corpus Christi, TX.
USGS scientist Alec McDonald surveying high water marks from storm surge from Hurricane Harvey at Packery Channel near Corpus Christi, Texas.(Credit: Vidal Mendoza, USGS. Public domain.)