Cascades Volcano Observatory

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Date published: May 18, 2011

New Time-lapse Animation of Mount St. Helens 1980 Ash Cloud as Seen from Space

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Cascades Volcano Observatory rediscovered an old cache of satellite images captured on May 18-19, 1980, and linked them together to create a time-lapse movie of Mount St. Helens' eruptive ash cloud movement across the western United States.

Date published: May 14, 2010

Mount St. Helens 30th Anniversary

Vancouver, Wash. — On Sunday, May 18, 1980 at 8:32 a.m., the bulging north flank of Mount St. Helens slid away in a massive landslide -- the largest in recorded history.  Seconds later, the uncorked volcano exploded and blasted rocks northward across forest ridges and valleys, destroying everything in its path within minutes.

Date published: May 4, 2010

Open house at the Cascades Volcano Observatory

Volcano Kids activity room, new volcano poster, and memory book highlight this year's event.

Vancouver, Wash. — How would you like to have your picture taken in the crater of Mount St. Helens? Visitors to the Cascades Volcano Observatory during its annual open house this Saturday will be able to do just that, courtesy of a “green-screen”, and take advantage of many other...

Date published: March 18, 2010

Mount St. Helens Reawakens: The Thirtieth Anniversary

Vancouver, Wash.—A magnitude 4.2 earthquake 30 years ago Saturday marked the reawakening of Mount St. Helens after 123 years of inactivity and set the stage for the most destructive eruption in U.S. history.

Date published: August 25, 2009

Media Representatives invited to interview USGS scientists inside the Mount St. Helens crater

Two U.S. Geological Survey Cascade Volcano Observatory scientists will be available inside the crater of Mount St. Helens. This will provide a unique opportunity to capture the sights and sounds inside the crater and to learn about their latest findings and research.

Date published: August 13, 2009

Recovery Funding for the Cascades Volcano Observatory and Other Volcano Observatories to Improve Monitoring and Public Safety

Residents and critical infrastructure in the nation's six highest-risk volcanic areas—including the Northwest region of the United States-- will benefit from increased monitoring and analysis as a result of Recovery Act funds being channeled into volcano monitoring, Secretary Salazar announced today.

Date published: July 10, 2008

Mount St. Helens Officially Slumbers— Alert Level Goes Back to Normal —

VANCOUVER, WA-  Scientists say the nearly three and a half years of eruption at Mount St. Helens is over for now and have lowered the volcano alert level from Advisory to Normal and the aviation color code from Yellow to Green. 

Date published: May 10, 2008

Notice of Product Availability: Mount St. Helens Action Footage Available

B-roll footage documenting the continuous eruption of Mount St. Helens from September 2006 through February 2008 is now available from the U.S. Geological Survey.

Date published: February 21, 2008

Mount St. Helens Takes a Rest

VANCOUVER, WA-The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reported today that a dome of lava that has been growing continuously in the crater of Mount St. Helens in Washington State for more than three years has stopped. 

Date published: April 12, 2007

USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory Posts Annual Summary of Information Regarding Status of Uplift at Three Sisters Area of Central Oregon

Today, the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory web site is posting a summary of current information regarding the Three Sisters area of central Oregon, which has been the site of slow uplift over a broad region since 1997.

Date published: September 27, 2006

Mount St. Helens: A Two Year Anniversary Analysis of the Ongoing Eruption

It has been two years since Mount St. Helens began its current dome-building eruption.  Join CVO scientists for a retrospective and analysis of the ongoing eruption.

Date published: September 27, 2006

Mount St. Helens: A Two Year Anniversary Analysis of the Ongoing Eruption

It has been two years since Mount St. Helens began its current dome-building eruption.  Join CVO scientists for a retrospective and analysis of the ongoing eruption.