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July 20, 2022

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory conducted a geology monitoring overflight of Kīlauea summit on July 19, 2022.

An eruption at Kīlauea's summit began at approximately 3:20 p.m. HST on September 29, 2021. Lava activity is confined within Halema‘uma‘u crater, in the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

July 19, 2022 — Kīlauea summit overflight

Color photograph of shield volcano
Aerial view of Mauna Loa taken during a Hawaiian Volcano Observatory overflight of Kīlauea summit on July 19, 2022. USGS image by K. Mulliken. 
Color photograph of caldera
Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists captured this view of the caldera at Kīlauea summit during an overflight the morning of July 19, 2022. The active lava lake is visible within Halema‘uma‘u crater, the floor of which continues to slowly rise as the eruption continues. The former Hawaiian Volcano Observatory buildings can be seen in the lower center portion of the photo. USGS image by K. Mulliken. 
Color photograph of lava lake
Aerial view of the western portion of Halema‘uma‘u crater at the summit of Kīlauea, taken during a Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geology monitoring overflight on July 19, 2022. The floor of Halema‘uma‘u crater continues to rise as the eruption at the summit of Kīlauea continues, with lava flows encroaching on the down-dropped block located to the southwest of Halema‘uma‘u (center left part of this image). Mauna Loa volcano is visible in the background. USGS image by K. Mulliken. 
Color photograph of lava lake
During a Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Kīlauea summit monitoring overflight on July 19, 2022, lava was oozing out the northern edge of Halema‘uma‘u crater floor. Incandescent lava is visible in this area, near the bottom center of this image, where lava is slowly encroaching on the large down-dropped block that formed during the 2018 caldera collapse. USGS image by J. Chang.  
Color photograph of lava flow
A closer view of active lava on the north margin of Halema‘uma‘u crater, at Kīlauea summit. This small pad of lava oozed out from the crater floor along the north boundary of the crater, near where the down-dropped block to the east slopes down towards Halema‘uma‘u crater. USGS image by K. Mulliken. 
Color photograph of lava lake
An aerial image of the western portion of Halema‘uma‘u crater at the summit of Kīlauea. The active lava lake within the western portion of Halema‘uma‘u crater is visible in approximately the center of the image, and lava spattering is visible along the eastern edge of the lake. This view is from the north side of the crater, and looks generally to the south.  USGS image by K. Mulliken. 
Color photograph of crater floor
Telephoto aerial image of a hornito on the surface of the eastern part of Halema‘uma‘u crater floor at the summit of Kīlauea. In the foreground, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory monitoring equipment on the eastern rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater gives a sense of scale. Several hornitos, each several tens of feet tall, rise from the floor of Halema‘uma‘u crater. These hornitos are small spatter cones that are supplied with lava from beneath the solidified surface crust that forms the floor of Halema‘uma‘u crater. USGS image by J. Chang. 
Color photograph of crater floor and vent
Aerial view looking west across the floor of Halema‘uma‘u crater during a Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Kīlauea summit geology overflight on July 19, 2022. In the middle of the image, the island that formed during the early phases of the eruption that began the evening of December 20, 2020, is visible; behind it, the west vent area is visible as a series of jagged peaks emitting volcanic gas. On July 18, a sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rate of approximately 1,700 tonnes per day (t/d) was measured. USGS image by J. Chang. 
Color photograph of caldera wall
Aerial view of the north wall of Kīlauea caldera. The bright green area near the center of the image is the Volcano Golf Course. Between it and the caldera edge is the Kīlauea Military Camp. Mauna Kea rises beyond the slopes of the Northeast Rift Zone of Mauna Loa in the background. USGS image by J. Chang. 
Color photograph of trail
An aerial view of the Sulphur Banks area and Ha‘akulamanu trail within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park taken during an overflight of Kīlauea summit on July 19, 2022. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory gas geochemists sample fumaroles in the Sulphur Banks area approximately every three months to track long-term changes in volcanic gas chemistry at Kīlauea. USGS photo by J. Chang.