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Book review: Hollowed ground—Copper mining and community building on Lake Superior, 1840s–1990s

January 1, 2010

In 1843, six years before the Forty-niners headed west for the goldfields of California, the United States’ first great mineral rush began to a land that was, as Patrick Henry told Congress, “beyond the most distant wilderness and remote as the moon.” He was referring to the Keweenaw Peninsula of northern Michigan. This rush was not for gold or silver, but for copper. And not just any copper, but native copper, so pure it required little refining before use. The early horde of fortune-seekers came with visions of finding mountains of solid copper, spurred on by stories of large masses of “float copper” that included the famous Ontonagon Boulder, a large mass of native copper originally found lying 32 km up the steep and rugged valley of the Ontonagon River (and now gathering dust in the Smithsonian Museum).

Citation Information

Publication Year 2010
Title Book review: Hollowed ground—Copper mining and community building on Lake Superior, 1840s–1990s
DOI 10.2113/econgeo.105.7.1353
Authors Klaus J. Schulz
Publication Type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Series Title Economic Geology
Series Number
Index ID 70193187
Record Source USGS Publications Warehouse
USGS Organization Eastern Mineral and Environmental Resources Science Center