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Declining occurrence and low colonization probability in freshwater mussel assemblages: A dynamic occurrence modeling approach

December 31, 2017

Mussel monitoring data are abundant, but methods for analyzing long-term trends in these data are often uninformative or have low power to detect changes. We used a dynamic occurrence model, which accounted for imperfect species detection in surveys, to assess changes in species occurrence in a longterm data set (1986–2011) for the Tar River basin of North Carolina, USA. Occurrence of all species decreased steadily over the time period studied. Occurrence in 1986 ranged from 0.19 for Utterbackia imbecillis to 0.60 for Fusconaia masoni. Occurrence in 2010–2011 ranged from 0.10 for Lampsilis radiata to 0.40 for F. masoni. The maximum difference between occurrence in 1986 and 2011 was a decline of 0.30 for Alasmidonta undulata. Mean persistence for all species was high (0.97, 95% CI ¼ 0.95–0.99); however, mean colonization probability was very low (,0.01, 95% CI ¼ ,0.01–0.01). These results indicate that mussels persisted at sites already occupied but that they have not colonized sites where they had not occurred previously. Our findings highlight the importance of modeling approaches that incorporate imperfect detection in estimating species occurrence and revealing temporal trends to inform conservation planning.

Citation Information

Publication Year 2017
Title Declining occurrence and low colonization probability in freshwater mussel assemblages: A dynamic occurrence modeling approach
DOI 10.31931/fmbc.v20i1.2017.13-19
Authors Tamara J. Pandolfo, Thomas J. Kwak, W. Gregory Cope, Ryan J. Heise, Robert B. Nichols, Krishna Pacifici
Publication Type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Series Title Freshwater Mollusk Biology and Conservation
Index ID 70197037
Record Source USGS Publications Warehouse
USGS Organization Coop Res Unit Atlanta

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