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Landscapes to riverscapes: bridging the gap between research and conservation of stream fishes

January 1, 2002

Rivers and streams, by their very nature long ribbons of aquatic habitat, are inherently difficult to study. Approaching the banks of a flowing-water (lotic) system, one can see only a short fragment of the entire stream, from one bend to another, and can gain little appreciation for important features that lie beyond view. Moreover, materials transported downstream by the flow, and organisms traveling up or down the hydraulic highway, are soon gone from the reach and the opportunity to study them is often lost. Lakes present their own challenges for study, but by contrast to streams, one can usually see large expanses from shore that encompass all major habitats needed for aquatic organisms to complete their life history, such as gravel shoals, beds of aquatic vegetation, and open water habitats

Citation Information

Publication Year 2002
Title Landscapes to riverscapes: bridging the gap between research and conservation of stream fishes
DOI 10.1641/0006-3568(2002)052[0483:LTRBTG]2.0.CO;2
Authors Kurt D. Fausch, Christian E. Torgersen, Colden V. Baxter, Hiram W. Li
Publication Type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Series Title BioScience
Series Number
Index ID 1016365
Record Source USGS Publications Warehouse
USGS Organization Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center

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