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Lava flowing across the landscape
June 24, 2018

Kīlauea Volcano — Lava Flows from Fissure 8

View to the southwest, looking "up" the lava channel. Lava flows from Fissure 8 (not pictured) through the open channel about 13 km (8 mi) to the ocean. Lava remains incandescent (glowing orange) along the entire length of the channel with sections of cooled lava (black) on the surface. The dark areas in the lower portion of the image are parts of the early lava flow from

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Lava fountain with lava flow
June 24, 2018

Kīlauea Volcano — Fissure 8 Fountain

At fissure 8, fountains provide a vigorous supply of lava that exits the cinder cone and drops over a spillway to enter a well-established 

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Geologist pointing into the distance along a road with a straight roadway beside him.
June 24, 2018

Kīlauea Volcano — Roadway Crack Observations

USGS field crews track activity in and around Leilani Estates in Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone. Observations are also collected on a daily basis from cracks in the area of Highway 130, shown here (no changes in temperature, crack width, or gas emissions have been noted recently).

Lava spattering from a cone
June 24, 2018

Kīlauea Volcano — Spatter Cone (Fissure 8)

The spatter cone at fissure 8 is now about 55 m (180 ft) tall. 

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Small plume cloud from a crater
June 24, 2018

Kīlauea Volcano — Small Halema`uma`u Eruption (June 24, 2018)

On June 24 a small ash-poor steam plume rose above the Halema‘uma‘u crater rim following another collapse explosion event at 4:12 p.m. HST (image taken at 4:27 p.m.).

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Kīlauea fissure 8 lava channel transports "lava boats"...
June 23, 2018

Kīlauea fissure 8 lava channel transports "lava boats"

Geologists captured this time-lapse video of the perched lava channel issuing from fissure 8 on Kīlauea's lower East Rift Zone.

Rafts of accreted lava move down stream and look like boats moving down a river. These are termed lava balls or lava boats and form when portions of the fissure 8 cone or levees break away and are rafted down stream. As they move along

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Crater view
June 23, 2018

Kīlauea Volcano — Halema`uma`u Crater Collapse (June 23, 2018)

On June 23, 2018 at 4:32 p.m. HST after approximately 17 hours of elevated seismicity, a collapse explosion occurred at the summit if Kīlauea. The energy released by the

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Mauna Loa Back to Normal...
June 22, 2018

Mauna Loa Back to Normal

View of cinder cones in the Northeast Rift Zone near the summit of Mauna Loa. View to the north-northeast with Mauna Kea in the background. Mauna Loa has erupted 33 times since 1843, most recently erupting in 1975 and 1984. Photo credit: Matt Patrick, USGS

View of Halema`uma`u crater
June 22, 2018

Kīlauea Volcano — Halema‘uma‘u Crater

Halema'uma'u crater at 8:30 a.m., view is toward the south. Several benches are clearly visible within the crater. The benches are sections of the former crater rim and adjacent Kīlauea 

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Aerial of lava channel
June 22, 2018

Kīlauea Volcano — Fissure 8 Lava Channel

Early morning view of the open lava channelbeginning about 5 km (3.1 miles) from Fissure 8. The channel bends 90 degrees to the south (right) on the far side of

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Lava fountaining with lava channel flowing away
June 22, 2018

Kīlauea Volcano — Fissure 8 Lava Fountain

Lava continues to erupt at a high rate from 

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USGS science for a changing world logo
June 26, 2003

 

An unprecedented experiment to track the travel route of microscopic coral larvae will be conducted off the coast of Maui from June 29 to July 5 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the University of Hawai‘i, the Hawaiian Division of Aquatic Resources, the Maui Ocean Center, and the University of Washington. 

USGS
June 26, 2003

An unprecedented experiment to track the travel route of microscopic coral larvae will be conducted off the coast of Maui from June 29 to July 5 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the University of Hawai‘i, the Hawaiian Division of Aquatic Resources, the Maui Ocean Center, and the University of Washington.

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 27, 2002

On January 3, 2003, Kilauea Volcano, perhaps the world’s most active volcano on the Island of Hawai`i, will have been erupting continuously for 20 years. Since the eruption began in 1983, lava flows have covered 43 square miles of the volcano, added nearly 550 acres to the island, created local volcanic air pollution known as "vog," and drawn millions of people to experience and enjoy volcan

USGS
December 27, 2002

On January 3, 2003, Kilauea Volcano, perhaps the world’s most active volcano on the Island of Hawai`i, will have been erupting continuously for 20 years. Since the eruption began in 1983, lava flows have covered 43 square miles of the volcano, added nearly 550 acres to the island, created local volcanic air pollution known as "vog," and drawn millions of people to experience and enjoy...

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 6, 2002

Standard fare in geology textbooks and school classrooms across the world is that the hot springs, geysers and volcanoes of Yellowstone National Park, Hawaii, Iceland, and many other volcanic regions were "created" by plumes of hot rock that rise from near the Earth’s core. New results from recently published U.S. Geological Survey research hint, astonishingly, that such plumes may not exist.

USGS
October 29, 2002

When most people think of Hawaii, they think of a tranquil tropical paradise. But savvy Hawaiians know better: an old proverb says that "when the gales blow, the sea is white-backed; when the sea rises, corals are washed ashore."

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 30, 2002

Lava flows from the Pu`u `O`o vent on the east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii are entering the sea and are rapidly adding new land to the coast, according to the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. The USGS Web site http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea/update/ features near real time lava flow updates as well as photographs.

USGS
July 30, 2002

USGS Web Site Features Daily Lava Flow Updates and Photographs

Lava flows from the Pu`u `O`o vent on the east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii are entering the sea and are rapidly adding new land to the coast, according to the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

USGS
July 9, 1999

A highly endangered native Hawaiian bird species has taken a small but significant step back from the brink of extinction. USGS biologists monitoring 14 captive-reared puaiohi released into the wild earlier this year by The Peregrine Fund say the birds are nesting and have already fledged four young.

USGS
May 18, 1999

A small population of the endangered Hawaiian bird, palila, is holding steady on the western slopes of Mauna Kea volcano.

USGS
April 8, 1997

The term "geologic hazards" in Hawaii generally means volcanic eruptions and lava flows. A hazard that might not come to mind is the possibility of earthquakes, as large as magnitude-eight, under the flanks of the active volcanoes, according to Fred Klein, a seismologist with the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, Calif.

USGS
February 2, 1996

Air quality conditions at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park remain potentially hazardous today (Feb. 2, 1996) in the wake of an upwelling of molten lava at Kilauea volcano yesterday.