Unified Interior Regions

Alaska

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Filter Total Items: 194
Alaska geology map revealed
Date Published: June 11, 2018
Status: Active

Alaska Databases and Information Analysis

We provide GIS and database support for Alaska-based research projects, including database design, data capture, and maintenance, GIS analysis and display, and production of datasets and metadata for publication and data releases.

Contacts: Nora B Shew
Half-meter-thick quartz veins cut across outcrops of granitic gneiss on Divide Mountain along the Alaska-Yukon border
Date Published: May 22, 2018
Status: Active

Tectonic and Metallogenic Evolution of the Eastern Yukon-Tanana Upland, Alaska

The Yukon-Tanana terrane, stretching from eastern Alaska to northern British Columbia, is a geologically complex block containing deposits of base-metal, platinum-group-element, and gold-silver-copper mineralization.

Darby Mountain outcrop of quartz monzonite towards the contact between the pluton and Paleozoic marbles
Date Published: May 22, 2018
Status: Active

Petrology, Tectonic Setting, and Potential for Concentration of Rare Earth Elements (REE) and High Field Strength Elements (HFSE) in the High-K Darby and Kachauik Plutons, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

One of the geologic environments that host rare earth and other critical and strategic element deposits are alkaline intrusive rocks.

Scientists wait for a helicopter pickup at a geologic mapping and sampling station high in the Neacola Mountains, Alaska
Date Published: May 22, 2018
Status: Completed

Metallogeny and Tectonics of the Lake Clark and Neacola Mountains Region, South-central Alaska

Alaska hosts a well-documented belt of ore deposits that lies roughly parallel to the Alaska Range, beginning at the Alaska Peninsula in the southwest, continuing up through the Fairbanks Mining District in the north, and curving back into the Tintina Gold Belt on its eastern end. Known mineral prospects and occurrences include porphyry copper, intrusion-related gold, volcanogenic massive...

Map of Alaska showing estimated mineral-resource potential
Date Published: May 22, 2018
Status: Active

GIS Prospectivity Analysis for Critical Minerals in Ore-Forming Systems in Alaska

Alaska is dominated by a history of tectonic events that foster mobilization and concentration of a wide variety of mineral commodities that are critical to the US economy and are vital to national defense, renewable-energy, and emerging electronics technologies.

Duck with various brown colored feathers
Date Published: May 18, 2018
Status: Active

High Priority Species for Avian Influenza in Alaska

In early 2006, an Alaska Interagency Avian Influenza Working Group was formed to develop a ranking matrix for selecting priority species to be sampled within Alaska. Most wild bird species with populations that utilize areas of both Alaska and Asia were identified and considered in the ranking exercise. Based on scoring criteria, 28 target species were chosen for sampling. Alaska is a...

Tundra Swan swimming on a lake in northern Alaska
Date Published: May 18, 2018
Status: Active

Bird Migration and Influenza

The movement and transmission of avian influenza viruses in wild birds may differ by the migratory nature of each host species.

Flooding encroaches on trees, Exit Creek
Date Published: May 18, 2018
Status: Active

Flood Frequency Studies in Alaska

 

Flood frequency statistics for streamgages and methods for estimating flood frequency statistics at ungaged sites in Alaska and conterminous basins in Canada are presented in U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2016-5024. This report revised methods for obtaining basin characteristics and...

Contacts: Janet H Curran
View of Toklat River from a bridge
Date Published: May 18, 2018
Status: Active

Flow Duration and Low-Flow Frequency Studies in Alaska

Flow duration and low-flow frequency statistics for streamgages and methods for estimating flow-duration and low-flow frequency statistics at ungaged sites in Alaska and conterminous basins in Canada are presented in U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources Investigations Report 2003-4114.

Contacts: Janet H Curran
A Tufted Puffin swimming in the sea in Lower Cook Inlet, Alaska
Date Published: May 10, 2018
Status: Active

Seabirds and Forage Fish Ecology

Alaska's coastal and offshore waters provide foraging habitat for an estimated 100 million birds comprising more than 90 different species; from loons and seaducks that nest inland, to petrels and puffins that breed on islands off shore. All these birds depend on the sea to provide a wide variety of food types— from clams, crabs and urchins nearshore— to krill, forage fish, and squid offshore...

Photo of Bird Bands in a Variety of Sizes and Types
Date Published: May 1, 2018
Status: Active

Bird Banding Laboratory

The Bird Banding Laboratory (BBL) is an integrated scientific program established in 1920 supporting the collection, archiving, management and dissemination of information from banded and marked birds in North America.  This information is used to monitor the status and trends of resident and migratory bird populations. Because birds are good indicators of the health of the environment, the...

Mother and young caribou on Yukon-Alaska border
Date Published: April 27, 2018
Status: Active

Terrestrial Wildlife and Habitats

The USGS conducts research on trust Department of Interior migratory bird and mammal species and their habitats to inform agencies such as the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management and National Park Service in their natural resource management decisions.

The Alaska Science Center focuses its research on a wide range of species important to the Department.

Filter Total Items: 125
USGS
January 1, 2018

The Assessment Unit is the fundamental unit used in the National Assessment Project for the assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources. The Assessment Unit is defined within the context of the higher-level Total Petroleum System. The Assessment Unit is shown herein as a geographic boundary interpreted, defined, and mapped by the geologist responsible for the province and incorporates

USGS
January 1, 2018

Fire can be a significant driver of permafrost change in boreal landscapes, altering the availability of soil carbon and nutrients that have important implications for future climate and ecological succession. However, not all landscapes are equally susceptible to fire-induced change. As fire frequency is expected to increase in the high latitudes, methods to understand the vulnerability an

placeholder for data files
January 1, 2018

This dataset contains measures of oxygen consumption and stroke frequency from 1 captive subadult female polar bear (166.5 kg) resting in the water (n = 7 sessions) and swimming and diving in a metabolic swim flume with water circulated at approximately 0.6 km/hr during swimming and diving measurements (n = 6 sessions) in September 2017.

USGS
January 1, 2018

Approximately 1,900 square kilometers of imagery were collected from July 14 to July 21, 2014 using a HyMap™ sensor (Cocks and others, 1998) mounted on a modified Piper Navajo aircraft. The survey area covered parts of the Wrangell and Nutzotin Mountains in the eastern Alaska Range near Nabesna, Alaska. The aircraft was flown at an altitude of approximately 5,050 meters (m

Bathymetric terrain model of Queen Charlotte Fault area, with multichannel sparker lines in black
December 29, 2017

Multibeam bathymetry and multichannel sparker seismic relfection data collected along the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault between Icy Point and Dixon Entrance, offshore southeastern Alaska from 2016-05-17 to 2016-06-12.

Location map shows lines where seismic reflection data was collected.
October 19, 2017

High-resolution multichannel minisparker and chirp seismic-reflection data were collected in August of 2015 to explore marine geologic hazards of inland waterways of southeastern Alaska. Sub-bottom profiles were acquired in the inland waters between Glacier Bay and Juneau, including Cross Sound and Chatham Strait.

Map of east Beaufort Sea area, Alaska, with lines to indicate exposed open-ocean versus sheltered mainland-lagoon shoreline area
September 18, 2017

This data release is an update to the original North Coast of Alaska data and includes revised rate-of-change calculations based on two additional shoreline positions data and improved rate metrics. 

The  R/V Alaskan Gyre in Katmai National Park, Alaska
August 1, 2017

The R/V Alaskan Gyre is a 50-foot fiberglass seiner that has been converted into a versatile research vessel to provide USGS scientists and collaborators with access to remote marine areas of Alaska and serve as a mobile laboratory.  The vessel was built by Ledford Marine of Marysville, Washington in 1989 and is named after the Alaskan Gyre, a series of wind driven currents that rotate counter clockwise in the Gulf of Alaska.

Tundra lakes, Selawik National Wildlife Refuge
March 15, 2017

WildCast's (WILDlife Potential Habitat ForeCASTing Project) photographic transect project of northwest Alaska provides access to the photographs, videos, flight routes, and associated data, that were taken during July 16, 17, and 18, 2013. The images depict land cover types as a baseline for measuring future change and to complement other existing grid-based sample photography of the region.

Bathymetric terrain model of Queen Charlotte Fault area, with multichannel sparker lines in black
January 1, 2017

Multibeam bathymetry data were collected along the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault between Icy Point and Dixon Entrance, offshore southeastern Alaska from 2016-05-17 to 2016-06-12. Data were collected aboard the Alaska Department of Fish and Game R/V Medeia using a Reson SeaBat 7160 multibeam echosounder, Reson 7k Control Center, and HYPACK. This data release contains approximately 4,

Map shows a line that illustrates the location in water where sonar data was collected.
January 1, 2017

This data release contains high-resolution seismic reflection data collected in August of 2015 to explore marine geologic hazards of inland waterways of southeastern Alaska. Sub-bottom profiles were acquired in the inland waters between Glacier Bay and Juneau, including Cross Sound and Chatham Strait. High-resolution seismic-reflection profiles were acquired to assess evidence for active seabed

Filter Total Items: 113
Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 1969

Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, on various communities: Chapter G in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities

The 1964 earthquake caused wide-spread damage to inhabited places throughout more than 60,000 square miles of south-central Alaska. This report describes damage to all communities in the area except Anchorage, Whittier, Homer, Valdez, Seward, the communities of the Kodiak group of islands, and communities in the Copper River Basin; these were...

Plafker, George; Kachadoorian, Reuben; Eckel, Edwin B.; Mayo, Lawrence R.
Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, on various communities: Chapter G in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities; 1969; PP; 542-G; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities (Professional Paper 542); Plafker, George; Kachadoorian, Reuben; Eckel, Edwin B.; Mayo, Lawrence R.

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Year Published: 1969

Erosion and deposition on a beach raised by the 1964 earthquake, Montague Island, Alaska: Chapter H in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

During the 1964 Alaska earthquake, tectonic deformation uplifted the southern end of Montague Island as much as 33 feet or more. The uplifted shoreline is rapidly being modified by subaerial and marine processes. The new raised beach is formed in bedrock, sand, gravel, and deltaic bay-head deposits, and the effect of each erosional process was...

Kirkby, M.J.; Kirkby, Anne V.
Erosion and deposition on a beach raised by the 1964 earthquake, Montague Island, Alaska: Chapter H in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects; 1969; PP; 543-H; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects (Professional Paper 543); Kirkby, M. J.; Kirkby, Anne V.

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Year Published: 1969

Tectonics of the March 27, 1964, Alaska earthquake: Chapter I in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

The March 27, 1964, earthquake was accomp anied by crustal deformation-including warping, horizontal distortion, and faulting-over probably more than 110,000 square miles of land and sea bottom in south-central Alaska. Regional uplift and subsidence occurred mainly in two nearly parallel elongate zones, together about 600 miles long and as much as...

Plafker, George
Tectonics of the March 27, 1964, Alaska earthquake: Chapter I in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects; 1969; PP; 543-I; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects (Professional Paper 543); Plafker, George

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Year Published: 1968

Seismic seiches from the March 1964 Alaska earthquake: Chapter E in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on hydrologic regimen

Seismic seiches caused by the Alaska earthquake of March 27, 1964, were recorded at more than 850 surface-water gaging stations in North America and at 4 in Australia. In the United States, including Alaska and Hawaii, 763 of 6,435 gages registered seiches. Nearly all the seismic seiches were recorded at teleseismic distance. This is the first...

McGarr, Arthur; Vorhis, Robert C.
Seismic seiches from the March 1964 Alaska earthquake: Chapter E in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on hydrologic regimen; 1968; PP; 544-E; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on the hydrologic regimen (Professional Paper 544); McGarr, Arthur; Vorhis, Robert C.

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Year Published: 1968

Effects of the Alaska earthquake of March 27, 1964, on shore processes and beach morphology: Chapter J in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

Some 10,000 miles of shoreline in south-central Alaska was affected by the subsidence or uplift associated with the great Alaska earthquake of March 27, 1964. The changes in shoreline processes and beach morphology that were suddenly initiated by the earthquake were similar to those ordinarily caused by gradual changes in sea level operating over...

Stanley, Kirk W.
Effects of the Alaska earthquake of March 27, 1964, on shore processes and beach morphology: Chapter J in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects; 1968; PP; 543-J; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects (Professional Paper 543); Stanley, Kirk W.

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Year Published: 1968

Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, on the Alaska highway system: Chapter C in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on transportation, communications, and utilities

The great earthquake that struck Alaska about 5:36 p.m., Alaska standard time, Friday, March 27, 1964 (03:36:1.3.0, Greenwich mean time, March 28, 1964), severely crippled the highway system in the south-central part of the State. All the major highways and most secondary roads were impaired. Damage totaled more than $46 million, well over $25...

Kachadoorian, Reuben
Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, on the Alaska highway system: Chapter C in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on transportation, communications, and utilities; 1968; PP; 545-C; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on transportation, communications, and utilities (Professional Paper 545); Kachadoorian, Reuben

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Year Published: 1967

Effects of the March 1964 Alaska earthquake on glaciers: Chapter D in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on hydrologic regimen

The 1964 Alaska earthquake occurred in a region where there are many hundreds of glaciers, large and small. Aerial photographic investigations indicate that no snow and ice avalanches of large size occurred on glaciers despite the violent shaking. Rockslide avalanches extended onto the glaciers in many localities, seven very large ones occurring...

Post, Austin
Effects of the March 1964 Alaska earthquake on glaciers: Chapter D in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on hydrologic regimen; 1967; PP; 544-D; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on the hydrologic regimen (Professional Paper 544); Post, Austin

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Year Published: 1967

Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, at Seward, Alaska: Chapter E in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities

Seward, in south-central Alaska, was one of the towns most devastated by the Alaska earthquake of March 27, 1964. The greater part of Seward is built on an alluvial fan-delta near the head of Resurrection Bay on the southeast coast of the Kenai Peninsula. It is one of the few ports in south-central Alaska that is ice free all year, and the town’s...

Lemke, Richard W.
Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, at Seward, Alaska: Chapter E in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities; 1967; PP; 542-E; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities (Professional Paper 542); Lemke, Richard W.

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Year Published: 1967

Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, on the communities of Kodiak and nearby islands: Chapter F in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities

The great earthquake (Richter magnitude of 8.4–8.5) that struck south-central Alaska at 5:36 p.m., Alaska standard time, on March 27, 1964 (03:36, March 28, Greenwich mean time), was felt in every community on Kodiak Island and the nearby islands. It was the most severe earthquake to strike this part of Alaska in modern time, and took the lives of...

Kachadoorian, Reuben; Plafker, George
Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, on the communities of Kodiak and nearby islands: Chapter F in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities; 1967; PP; 542-F; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities (Professional Paper 542); Kachadoorian, Reuben; Plafker, George

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Year Published: 1967

Ground breakage and associated effects in the Cook Inlet area, Alaska, resulting from the March 27, 1964 earthquake: Chapter F in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

The great 1964 Alaska earthquake caused considerable ground breakage in the Cook Inlet area of south-central Alaska. The breakage occurred largely in thick deposits of unconsolidated sediments. The most important types of ground breakage were (1) fracturing or cracking and the extrusion of sand and gravel with ground water along fractures in...

Foster, Helen L.; Karlstrom, Thor N.V.
Ground breakage and associated effects in the Cook Inlet area, Alaska, resulting from the March 27, 1964 earthquake: Chapter F in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects; 1967; PP; 543-F; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects (Professional Paper 543); Foster, Helen L.; Karlstrom, Thor N. V.

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Year Published: 1967

Hydrologic effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, outside Alaska, with sections on Hydroseismograms from the Nunn-Bush Shoe Co. well, Wisconsin, and Alaska earthquake effects on ground water in Iowa: Chapter C in The Alaska earthquakes, March 27, 1964: effects on hydrologic regimen

The Alaska earthquake of March 27, 1964, had widespread hydrologic effects throughout practically all of the United States. More than 1,450 water-level recorders, scattered throughout all the 50 States except Connecticut, Delaware, and Rhode Island, registered the earthquake. Half of the water-level records were obtained from ground-water...

Vorhis, Robert C.; Rexin, Elmer E.; Coble, R.W.
Hydrologic effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, outside Alaska, with sections on Hydroseismograms from the Nunn-Bush Shoe Co. well, Wisconsin, and Alaska earthquake effects on ground water in Iowa: Chapter C in The Alaska earthquakes, March 27, 1964: effects on hydrologic regimen; 1967; PP; 544-C; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on the hydrologic regimen (Professional Paper 544); Vorhis, Robert C.; Rexin, Elmer E.; Coble, R. W.

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Year Published: 1967

Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, on air and water transport, communications, and utilities systems in south-central Alaska: Chapter B in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on transportation, communications, and utilities

The earthquake of March 27, 1964, wrecked or severely hampered all forms of transportation, all utilities, and all communications systems over a very large part of south-central Alaska. Effects on air transportation were minor as compared to those on the water, highway, and railroad transport systems. A few planes were damaged or wrecked by...

Eckel, Edwin B.
Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, on air and water transport, communications, and utilities systems in south-central Alaska: Chapter B in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on transportation, communications, and utilities; 1967; PP; 545-B; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on transportation, communications, and utilities (Professional Paper 545); Eckel, Edwin B.

Filter Total Items: 1,036
caribou crossing a road within the Kuparuk oil field, Alaska
June 29, 2019

Caribou crossing a road, within Kuparuk oil field, North Slope, Alaska

Central Arctic Herd - caribou crossing a road within the Kuparuk oil field on the North Slope of Alaska. The photo was taken during the summer mosquito harassment period. 

Kasilof River sonar on a bridge
June 28, 2019

Kasilof River sonar on a bridge

Kasilof River sonar on a bridge

Tazlina River bridge
June 28, 2019

Tazlina River bridge

Tazlina River bridge

A Common Murre holds a Pacific sand lance near Gull Island, Alaska
June 19, 2019

A Common Murre holds a Pacific sand lance near Gull Island in Alaska

Northern Fulmars, Black-legged Kittiwakes, and Common Murres have all been tested for and contained harmful algal bloom (HAB) toxins. Since 2015, the USGS has worked with a variety of stakeholders to develop testing methods and research projects to better understand the geographic extent, timing and impacts of algal toxins in Alaska marine ecosystems.

Beaver lodge and drained impoundment in tributary of the Noatak River, Noatak National Preserve
June 12, 2019

Beaver lodge and drained impoundment in tributary of the Noatak River

Beaver lodge and drained impoundment in tributary of the Noatak River, Noatak National Preserve

Impounded water above beaver dam on the Wrench Creek, Noatak National Preserve
June 12, 2019

Impounded water above beaver dam on the Wrench Creek

Impounded water above beaver dam on the Wrench Creek, Noatak National Preserve

Beaver dam and lodge on the Ahaliknak Creek, Noatak National Preserve
June 9, 2019

Beaver dam and lodge on the Ahaliknak Creek, Noatak National Preserve

Beaver dam and lodge on the Ahaliknak Creek, Noatak National Preserve

Chilkat River bridge
May 30, 2019

Chilkat River bridge

Chilkat River bridge

Chilkat River sonar on a bridge
May 30, 2019

Chilkat River sonar on a bridge

Chilkat River sonar on a bridge

Kashwitna River bridge debris
May 13, 2019

Kashwitna River bridge debris

Kashwitna River bridge debris

Kashwitna River bridge
May 7, 2019

Kashwitna River bridge

Kashwitna River bridge

Michael Carey and Vanessa von Biela on Canning River
April 27, 2019

Michael Carey and Vanessa von Biela on Canning River

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Filter Total Items: 256
Probing the snow pack at the highest point in North America
September 2, 2015

A new, official height for Denali has been measured at 20,310 feet, just 10 feet less than the previous elevation of 20,320 feet which was established using 1950’s era technology.

collage of scientists conducting science related to each mission are
August 10, 2015

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — In the 20th century, Baranof Island in Southeastern Alaska has drawn attention for its gold, chrome and nickel deposits, timber industry, potential activity of the dormant Mount Edgecumbe volcano, and for numerous commercially developed hot springs.

On top of North America!
July 23, 2015

A team of four climbers has recently returned from the highest point in North America with new survey data to determine a more precise summit height of Mount McKinley. It is anticipated the new elevation finding will be announced in late August.

Image: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Vessel Seen Through Bird Flock
July 16, 2015

The U.S. Geological Survey today released the North Pacific Pelagic Seabird Database — a massive online resource compiling the results of 40 years of surveys by biologists from the United States, Canada, Japan and Russia. The database documents the abundance and distribution of 160 seabird and 41 marine mammal species over a 10 million-square-mile region of the North Pacific.

Image: Long-Range Radar Station and Landfill
July 1, 2015

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — In a new study published today, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey found that the remote northern Alaska coast has some of the highest shoreline erosion rates in the world. Analyzing over half a century of shoreline change data, scientists found the pattern is extremely variable with most of the coast retreating at rates of more than 1 meter a year.

Polar Bear Ecoregions: In the Seasonal Ice Ecoregion
June 30, 2015

Greenhouse gas emissions remain the primary threat to the preservation of polar bear populations worldwide. This conclusion holds true under both a reduced greenhouse gas emission scenario that stabilizes climate warming and another scenario where emissions and warming continue at the current pace, according to updated U.S. Geological Survey research models.

Mount McKinley landscape
June 15, 2015

A new GPS survey of Mount McKinley, the highest point in North America, will update the commonly accepted elevation of McKinley’s peak, 20,320 ft. The last survey was completed in 1953.

Map of basement domains
April 23, 2015

A map showing the many different pieces of Earth’s crust that comprise the nation’s geologic basement is now available from the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS
April 8, 2015

A new scientific synthesis suggests a gradual, prolonged release of greenhouse gases from permafrost soils in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions, which may afford society more time to adapt to environmental changes, say scientists in a paper published in Nature today. 

Image: Polar Bear at Rest
April 1, 2015

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — A team of scientists led by the U.S. Geological Survey found that polar bears, increasingly forced on shore due to sea ice loss, may be eating terrestrial foods including berries, birds and eggs, but any nutritional gains are limited to a few individuals and likely cannot compensate for lost opportunities to consume their traditional, lipid-rich prey—ice seals.