Unified Interior Regions

Alaska

The Alaska Region represents a resource-rich, dynamic landscape shaped by volcanos, earthquakes, major rivers, and glaciers. Here, we conduct research to inform management of Alaska’s extensive natural resources, inform national Arctic energy policy, and provide scientific information to help others understand, respond to, and mitigate impacts from natural hazards.

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Filter Total Items: 199
Date published: April 26, 2018
Status: Active

Hazards in Alaska

A major goal of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is to reduce the vulnerability of the people and areas most at risk from natural hazards. Working with partners throughout all sectors of society, the USGS provides information, products, and knowledge to help build more resilient communities. This site provides important links to a number of hazard related internet sites that provide important...

Date published: April 25, 2018
Status: Active

Arctic Lake Food Webs

From 2011 to 2013 we investigated freshwater food webs of Arctic Coastal Plain lakes in Alaska to improve our understanding how Arctic freshwater food webs may respond to landscape change the warmer, drier future.

Date published: April 25, 2018
Status: Active

Condition of Forage Fish in Prince William Sound During the Marine Heatwave

Changes in the body condition of a key forage fish species, Pacific sand lance (Ammodytes personatus), are examined to understand how energy transfer to predators may have been disrupted during the recent marine heatwave in the North Pacific (late 2013 to mid 2016).

Date published: April 24, 2018
Status: Active

Ecosystem Shifts in Arctic Seas

In addition to the direct effects of sea ice loss on walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) and polar bears (Ursus maritimus) that use ice as a platform, the decline of Arctic sea ice is predicted to promote a fundamental ecosystem shift from benthic animals that forage on the sea floor to pelagic animals that forage near the sea surface. 

Date published: April 24, 2018
Status: Active

Lake Trout Biochronologies as Long-term Climate and Productivity Indicators in Alaska Lake Ecosystems

High latitude ecosystems are among the most vulnerable to long-term climate change, yet continuous, multidecadal indicators by which to gauge effects on biology are scarce, especially in freshwater environments.

Contacts: Vanessa von Biela, Ph.D., Christian E Zimmerman, Ph.D., Bryan Black, Randy J. Brown, Dan Young
Date published: April 19, 2018
Status: Active

Primary Production Sources and Bottom-up Limitations in Nearshore Ecosystems

Kelp forests are among the world’s most productive habitats, but recent evidence suggests that production is highly variable.

Contacts: James L Bodkin, Christian E Zimmerman, Ph.D., David Douglas, Gordon Kruse, Franz Mueter
Date published: April 18, 2018
Status: Active

Hydro-Ecology of Arctic Thawing (HEAT): Ecology

Permafrost thaw is leading to a myriad of changes in physical and chemical conditions throughout the Arctic.

Date published: April 18, 2018
Status: Active

Effect of Elodea spp. on Fish Performance Mediated Through Food Web Interactions

The potential for invasive species introductions in Arctic and Subarctic ecosystems is growing as climate change manifests and human activity increases in high latitudes.

Contacts: Michael P Carey, Ph.D., Suresh Andrew Sethi, Ph.D., Christian E Zimmerman, Ph.D., Dan Young, Gordon Reeves, Theresa Tanner
Date published: April 17, 2018
Status: Active

Sockeye Salmon Migrating at the Northern Edge of Their Distribution

The physiological challenge for anadromous fish to migrate upriver to spawn and complete their life cycle is influenced by river temperature.

Contacts: Michael P Carey, Ph.D., Stephen D McCormick, Amy Regish, Christian E Zimmerman, Ph.D., Kevin D. Keith, Merlyn Schelske, Charlie Lean
Date published: April 16, 2018
Status: Active

Nearshore Fish Surveys in the Beaufort Sea

Nearshore systems provide habitat to a unique community of marine and diadromous (lives in both fresh and saltwater) fish and support high fish abundance.

Date published: April 11, 2018
Status: Active

Development and Validation of Hyperspectral Imager for Field and Lab Scanning

The Mineral Resources Program has advanced methods of imaging spectroscopy (hyperspectral remote sensing) that are now used routinely by the earth science and remote sensing communities for mineral mapping, soil quality mapping, hazard mitigation, and other terrestrial and planetary applications. The USGS is highly qualified to advance this technology based on its world class expertise in...

Contacts: Raymond Kokaly
Date published: April 3, 2018
Status: Active

Assessing heat stress in migrating Yukon River Chinook Salmon

We will examine evidence of heat stress in Yukon River Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) using heat shock proteins and gene expression.

Filter Total Items: 172
Date published: January 1, 2019

Orthophotomosaic images (natural color) of the north coast of Barter Island, Alaska acquired on July 05 2015 (GeoTIFF image; 8-cm resolution)

Aerial photographs were collected from a small, fixed-wing aircraft over the coast of Barter Island, Alaska on July 05 2015. Precise aircraft position information and structure-from-motion photogrammetric methods were combined to a derive high-resolution orthophotomosaic. This orthophotomosaic contain 3-band, 8-bit, unsigned raster data (red/green/blue; file format-GeoTIFF) with

Date published: January 1, 2019

Orthophotomosaic image (natural color) of the north coast of Barter Island, Alaska acquired on July 01 2014 (GeoTIFF image, 19-cm resolution)

Aerial photographs were collected from a small, fixed-wing aircraft over the coast of Barter Island, Alaska on July 01 2014, September 07 2014. Precise aircraft position information and structure-from-motion photogrammetric methods were combined to derive a high-resolution orthophotomosaic. This orthophotomosaic contain 3-band, 8-bit, unsigned raster data (red/green/blue; file f

Date published: December 19, 2018

Serological Data on Influenza A from Birds and Mammals on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Northern Alaska, 2011-2017

These data (in two spreadsheets) are the results of screening for influenza A viruses (IAV) in blood from wild animals that utilize the Arctic region of Alaska. 758 blood samples from nine wildlife species (3 mammal, 6 waterbird) were collected in Arctic Alaska, 2011-2017. Two different tests were used and the results are presented in separate spreadsheets. All blood samples were

Date published: December 17, 2018

Downloadable Data for Southern Alaska Oil and Gas Assessments

GIS Data for Southern Alaska Oil and Gas Assessments

Date published: December 17, 2018

Downloadable Data for Central Alaska Oil and Gas Assessments

GIS Data for Central Alaska Oil and Gas Assessments 

Date published: November 20, 2018

Downloadable Data for Northern Alaska Oil and Gas Assessments

Follow this link to access downloadable GIS and tabular data for this province.

Date published: November 15, 2018

Influenza A Virus Data from Migratory Birds, Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

Data set containing avian influenza sampling information for late summer and early autumn waterfowl and gulls within and around the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Alaska, 2011-2016. Data contains species, age, sex, collection data and location of sampled migratory birds. Laboratory specific data used to identify presence and absence of influenza A viruses (IAVs) from c

Date published: November 15, 2018

Gulf Watch Alaska Nearshore Component: Intertidal Soft-Sediment Invertebrates from Prince William Sound, Katmai National Park and Preserve, and Kenai Fjords National Park, 2007-2015

These data are part of the Gulf Watch Alaska (GWA) long term monitoring program, nearshore monitoring component. The data consists of species identification, counts, and size measurements from intertidal soft-sediment sampling sites. Observers excavated, identified, and measured invertebrates from soft sediment sites. Sites are in Alaska and include locations in Katmai National Park

Date published: November 14, 2018

U-Pb Isotopic Data and Ages of Detrital Zircon Grains and Graptolite Fossil Data from Selected Rocks from the Western Alaska Range, Livengood area, and Seward Peninsula, Alaska - 2018

This data set contains two data sets. One data set is of U-Pb isotopic data
and associated ages of detrital zircon grains from 16 sedimentary and
metasedimentary rocks from the western Alaska Range, Livengood area and
Seward Peninsula, Alaska. Two samples were collected from the York Mountains
area of the Seward Peninsula of western Alaska. Three samples were collected...

Date published: November 5, 2018

Brown Bear (Ursus acrtos) Captures and Serological Survey Results for Bacterial Viral and Parasitic Agents, Alaska, 2013-2016

Data set containing test results of screening blood and serum samples from five populations of Brown Bears in Alaska. Samples were tested to detect current or previous exposure to bacteria (Brucella spp., Francisella tularensis, and Leptospira spp.), viruses (canine adenovirus, canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus, and influenza A virus), and parasites (Toxoplasma gon

Date published: August 28, 2018

USGS Domestic Continuous (Unconventional) Oil & Gas Assessments, 2000-Present

Interactively explore assessment summary information for continuous (unconventional) assessments conducted at the USGS from 2000-2018. The assessment results data used to generate this visualization can be downloaded here in Excel Format.  These data represent all assessment results...

Date published: June 19, 2018

Alaska Resource Data File

The Alaska Resource Data File (ARDF) site provides descriptions of mines, prospects, and mineral occurrences for individual U.S. Geological Survey 1:250,000-scale quadrangles in Alaska.

Filter Total Items: 122
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Year Published: 1966

The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on hydrologic regimen

This is the fourth in a series of six reports that the U.S. Geological Survey published on the results of a comprehensive geologic study that began, as a reconnaissance survey, within 24 hours after the March 27, 1964, Magnitude 9.2 Great Alaska Earthquake and extended, as detailed investigations, through several field seasons. The 1964 Great...

Waller, Roger M.; Coble, R.W.; Post, Austin; McGarr, Arthur; Vorhis, Robert C.
The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on hydrologic regimen; 1966; PP; 544; Waller, Roger M.; Coble, R. W.; Post, Austin; McGarr, Arthur; Vorhis, Robert C.

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Year Published: 1966

Effects of the March 1964 Alaska earthquake on the hydrology of south-central Alaska: Chapter A in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on hydrologic regimen

The earthquake of March 27, 1964, greatly affected the hydrology of Alaska and many other parts of the world. Its far-reaching effects were recorded as water-level fluctuations in gages operated on water wells and streams. The close-in effects were even more striking, however; sediment-laden ground water erupted at the surface, and even ice-...

Waller, Roger M.
Effects of the March 1964 Alaska earthquake on the hydrology of south-central Alaska: Chapter A in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on hydrologic regimen; 1966; PP; 544-A; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on the hydrologic regimen (Professional Paper 544); Waller, Roger M.

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Year Published: 1966

Effects of the March 1964 Alaska earthquake on the hydrology of the Anchorage area, Alaska: Chapter B in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects hydrologic regimen

The Anchorage hydrologic system was greatly affected by the seismic shock. Immediate but temporary effects included increased stream discharge, seiche action on lakes, and fluctuations in ground-water levels. Generally, ground-water levels were residually lowered after the initial period of fluctuation. This lowering is attributed either to...

Waller, Roger M.
Effects of the March 1964 Alaska earthquake on the hydrology of the Anchorage area, Alaska: Chapter B in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects hydrologic regimen; 1966; PP; 544-B; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964 :effects on the hydrologic regimen (Professional Paper 544); Waller, Roger M.

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Year Published: 1966

Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964 in the Copper River Basin area, Alaska: Chapter E in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

The Copper River Basin area is in south-central Alaska and covers 17,800 square miles. It includes most of the Copper River Basin and parts of the surrounding Alaska Range and the Talkeetna, Chugach, and Wrangell Mountains. On March 27, 1964, shortly after 5:36 p.m. Alaska standard time, a great earthquake having a Richter magnitude of about 8.5...

Ferrians, Oscar J.
Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964 in the Copper River Basin area, Alaska: Chapter E in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects; 1966; PP; 543-E; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects (Professional Paper 543); Ferrians, Oscar J., Jr.

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Year Published: 1966

Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, at Valdez, Alaska: Chapter C in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities

Valdez is situated on the seaward edge of a large outwash delta composed of a thick section of saturated silty sand and gravel. The earthquake of March 27, 1964, triggered a massive submarine slide, involving approximately 98 million cubic yards of material that destroyed the harbor facilities and nearshore installations. Waves generated by the...

Coulter, Henry Welty; Migliaccio, Ralph R.
Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, at Valdez, Alaska: Chapter C in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities; 1966; PP; 542-C; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities (Professional Paper 542); Coulter, Henry Welty; Migliaccio, Ralph R.

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Year Published: 1966

Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, in the Homer area, Alaska, with a section on beach changes on Homer Spit: Chapter D in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities

The March 27, 1964, earthquake shook the Homer area for about 3 minutes. Land effects consisted of a 2- to 6-foot subsidence of the mainland and Homer Spit, one earthflow at the mouth of a canyon, several landslides on the Homer escarpment and along the sea bluffs, and minor fissuring of the ground, principally at the edges of bluffs and on Homer...

Waller, Roger M.; Stanley, Kirk W.
Effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, in the Homer area, Alaska, with a section on beach changes on Homer Spit: Chapter D in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities; 1966; PP; 542-D; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: effects on communities (Professional Paper 542); Waller, Roger M.; Stanley, Kirk W.

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Year Published: 1966

Geologic effects of the March 1964 earthquake and associated seismic sea waves on Kodiak and nearby islands, Alaska: Chapter D in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

Kodiak Island and the nearby islands constitute a mountainous landmass with an aggregate area of 4,900 square miles that lies at the western border of the Gulf of Alaska and from 20 to 40 miles off the Alaskan mainland. Igneous and metamorphic rocks underlie most of the area except for a narrow belt of moderately to poorly indurated rocks...

Plafker, George; Kachadoorian, Reuben
Geologic effects of the March 1964 earthquake and associated seismic sea waves on Kodiak and nearby islands, Alaska: Chapter D in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects; 1966; PP; 543-D; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects (Professional Paper 543); Plafker, George; Kachadoorian, Reuben

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Year Published: 1966

Geomorphic effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, in the Martin-Bering Rivers area, Alaska: Chapter B in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

The Alaska earthquake of March 27, 1964, caused widespread geomorphic changes in the Martin-Bering Rivers area-900 square miles of uninhabited mountains, alluvial flatlands, and marshes north of the Gulf of Alaska, and east of the Copper River. This area is at lat 60°30’ N. and long 144°22’ W., 32 miles east of Cordova, and approximately 130 miles...

Tuthill, Samuel J.; Laird, Wilson M.
Geomorphic effects of the earthquake of March 27, 1964, in the Martin-Bering Rivers area, Alaska: Chapter B in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects; 1966; PP; 543-B; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects (Professional Paper 543); Tuthill, Samuel J.; Laird, Wilson M.

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Year Published: 1966

Gravity survey and regional geology of the Prince William Sound epicentral region, Alaska: Chapter C in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

Sedimentary and volcanic rocks of Mesozoic and early Tertiary age form a roughly arcuate pattern in and around Prince William Sound, the epicentral region of the Alaska earthquake of 1964. These rocks include the Valdez Group, a predominantly slate and graywacke sequence of Jurassic and Cretaceous age, and the Orca Group, a younger sequence of...

Case, J.E.; Barnes, D.F.; Plafker, George; Robbins, S.L.
Gravity survey and regional geology of the Prince William Sound epicentral region, Alaska: Chapter C in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects; 1966; PP; 543-C; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects (Professional Paper 543); Case, J. E.; Barnes, D. F.; Plafker, George; Robbins, S. L.

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Year Published: 1966

Slide-induced waves, seiching and ground fracturing caused by the earthquake of March 27, 1964 at Kenai Lake, Alaska: Chapter A in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

The March 27, 1964, earthquake dislodged slides from nine deltas in Kenai Lake, south-central Alaska. Sliding removed protruding parts of deltas-often the youngest parts-and steepened delta fronts, increasing the chances of further sliding. Fathograms show that debris from large slides spread widely over the lake floor, some reaching the toe of...

McCulloch, David S.
Slide-induced waves, seiching and ground fracturing caused by the earthquake of March 27, 1964 at Kenai Lake, Alaska: Chapter A in The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects; 1966; PP; 543-A; The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects (Professional Paper 543); McCulloch, David S.

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Year Published: 1966

The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: field investigations and reconstruction effort

One of the greatest geotectonic events of our time occurred in southern Alaska late in the afternoon of March 27, 1964. Beneath a leaden sky, the chill of evening was just settling over the Alaskan countryside. Light snow was falling on some communities. It was Good Friday, schools were closed, and the business day was ending. Suddenly without...

Hansen, Wallace R.; Eckel, Edwin B.; Schaem, William E.; Lyle, Robert E.; George, Warren; Chance, Genie
The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: field investigations and reconstruction effort; 1966; PP; 541; Hansen, Wallace R.; Eckel, Edwin B.; Schaem, William E.; Lyle, Robert E.; George, Warren; Chance, Genie

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Year Published: 1966

The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects

This is the third in a series of six reports that the U.S. Geological Survey published on the results of a comprehensive geologic study that began, as a reconnaissance survey, within 24 hours after the March 27, 1964, Magnitude 9.2 Great Alaska Earthquake and extended, as detailed investigations, through several field seasons. The 1964 Great...

McCulloch, David S.; Tuthill, Samuel J.; Laird, Wilson M.; Case, J.E.; Barnes, D.F.; Plafker, George; Robbins, S.L.; Kachadoorian, Reuben; Ferrians, Oscar J.; Foster, Helen L.; Karlstrom, Thor N.V.; Kirkby, M.J.; Kirkby, Anne V.; Stanley, Kirk W.
The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: regional effects; 1966; PP; 543; McCulloch, David S.; Tuthill, Samuel J.; Laird, Wilson M.; Case, J.E.; Barnes, D.F.; Plafker, George; Robbins, S.L.; Kachadoorian, Reuben; Ferrians, Oscar J., Jr.; Foster, Helen L.; Karlstrom, Thor N.V.; Kirkby, M.J.; Kirkby, Anne V.; Stanley, Kirk W.

Filter Total Items: 1,079
Kashwitna River bridge debris
May 13, 2019

Kashwitna River bridge debris

Kashwitna River bridge debris

Kashwitna River bridge
May 7, 2019

Kashwitna River bridge

Kashwitna River bridge

Hole in the ice from an auger
April 27, 2019

Hole in the ice from an auger on Canning River

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

April 27, 2019

Under Ice Habitat in Canning River Delta

In the Arctic, rivers are often thought to freeze completely during winter. Since fish need liquid water to survive, there are few places where they can live. Fish usually inhabit deep river channels and areas where springwater enters a stream. However, this video shows that winter habitat occurs in places we didn't expect, below the ice in the delta of a shallow river. 

Lowering minnow trap to fish
April 27, 2019

Lowering minnow trap to fish

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Minnow trap in icehole
April 27, 2019

Minnow trap in icehole

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Shublik Spring open water
April 27, 2019

Shublik Spring open water

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Canning River with bars
April 27, 2019

Canning River with bars

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Michael Carey and Vanessa von Biela on Canning River
April 27, 2019

Michael Carey and Vanessa von Biela on Canning River

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Canning River with bars view
April 26, 2019

Canning River with bars view

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Vanessa von Biela with cut bank at Canning River
April 25, 2019

Vanessa von Biela with cut bank at Canning River

Supporting the project of winter habitat of juvenile Dolly Varden in the Canning River.

Copper River sonar on a bridge
April 24, 2019

Copper River sonar on a bridge

Copper River sonar on a bridge

Filter Total Items: 273
USGS science for a changing world logo
January 20, 2015

ANCHORAGE, Alaska Melting glaciers are not just impacting sea level, they are also affecting the flow of organic carbon to the world’s oceans, according to new research that provides the first ever global-scale estimates for the storage and release of organic carbon from glaciers.

Image: Steve Hickman Earthquake Science Center Director
January 12, 2015

The U.S. Geological Survey is pleased to announce the selection of Dr. Stephen Hickman to serve as the new director of the USGS Earthquake Science Center, headquartered in Menlo Park, California.

collage of scientists conducting science related to each mission are
January 6, 2015

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — In a new polar bear study published today, scientists from around the Arctic have shown that recent generations of polar bears are moving towards areas with more persistent year-round sea ice.

USGS
December 18, 2014

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announced today that Interior’s Alaska Climate Science Center is awarding more than $500,000 to universities and other partners for research to guide managers of parks, refuges and other cultural and natural resources in planning how to help species and ecosystems adapt to climate change.

collage of scientists conducting science related to each mission are
December 15, 2014

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — A polar bear capture and release-based research program had no adverse long-term effects on feeding behavior, body condition, and reproduction, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey.

collage of scientists conducting science related to each mission are
November 17, 2014

In a new polar bear study published today, scientists from the United States and Canada found that during the first decade of the 21st century, the number of polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea experienced a sharp decline of approximately 40 percent. 

Location of study site in western Alaska and Radarsat-1 satellite images of the Hazen Bay coast during low water
September 23, 2014

Scientists examined storm flooding events in the Bering Sea region of western Alaska from 1913 to 2011 and found that the largest events occurred in autumn and were associated with high tides and strong southwest winds.

Landcover map (left) and pedestrian evacuation time estimate map (right) Ocean Shores, Washington.
September 16, 2014

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey have developed a new mapping tool, the Pedestrian Evacuation Analyst, for use by researchers and emergency managers to estimate how long it would take for someone to travel on foot out of a tsunami-hazard zone.

collage of scientists conducting science related to each mission are
September 8, 2014

The Pacific walrus population roughly halved between 1981 and 1999, the last year for which demographic data are available. A recent study by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey quantifies this historic population decline.

USGS
July 24, 2014

Alaska — Due to climate change, some communities in rural Alaska and the Yukon Territory of Canada may face a future with fewer caribou according to new research published by the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Alaska, Fairbanks in the recent issue of PLoS ONE.

USGS
July 9, 2014

Monitoring wildlife in the Arctic is difficult. Study areas are cold, barren and often inaccessible. For decades scientists have struggled to study animals, like polar bears, which live in these remote areas. Now researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey have begun testing a new, yet counterintuitive solution – rather then get close to the animals, monitor them from afar.