Unified Interior Regions

California

The Southwest Region includes California, Nevada, and Arizona. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Three people wearing safety gear standing on a ship deck hold a metal frame strapped to rigging.
September 1, 2011

Camera sled deployment off research vessel

U.S. Geological Survey geographer Nadine Golden (center, kneeling) works with USGS marine operations staffer Cordell Johnson (right) and a deckhand (left) to deploy a camera sled from the research vessel Coral Sea. The sled is towed close to the seafloor and collects real-time photographs and videos. Observers on board the vessel can watch the live video feed and

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August 25, 2011

PubTalk 8/2011 — Through the Lens of Time

Repeat Photography in an Era of Global Change

by Robert Webb, Hydrologist

  • Repeat photography remains an essential and cost-effective technique for scientists and researchers working to track and study changing environmental conditions
  • Scientists worldwide are exploring methods to apply this technique in various
July 28, 2011

PubTalk 7/2011 — How is San Francisco Bay Doing?

discoveries from 4 decades of studies

by Jim Cloern, Senior Research Biologist

 

  • San Francisco Bay is in a continual state of change.
  • Drivers of change include:
    • residiual effects of the Gold Mining era
    • the 1972 Clean Water Act
    • urbanization of the landscape
    • transoceanic shipping
June 30, 2011

PubTalk 6/2011 — Exploring California's Amazing Seafloor

--the visionary California Seafloor Mapping Program

by Sam Johnson, USGS Pacific Coastal & Marine Science Center 

 

May 26, 2011

PubTalk 5/2011 — The Future of Rare Earth Elements

--Will these high-tech industry elements continue in short supply?

by Keith Long, USGS Mineral Resource Analyst

 

  • Rare earth elements provide critical material for flat-panel display screens, cell phones, electric cars, windmills, etc.
  • Although relatively abundant in nature, deposits of rare earth elements that
April 28, 2011

PubTalk 4/2011 - Predictable Earthquakes

Title: Predictable Earthquakes - updating earthquake prediction - fact vs. fiction 

  • Although scientists were optimistic about earthquake prediction in the 1970s, reliable short-term prediction has remained an elusive goal
  • What have seismologists learned from recent earthquakes in Haiti, Chile, and Japan? 
  • Great strides have
April 28, 2011

PubTalk 4/2011 — "Predictable Earthquakes"

--updating earthquake prediction--fact vs. fiction

by Susan Hough, USGS Seismologist 

 

  • Although scientists were optimistic about earthquake prediction in the 1970s, reliable short-term prediction has remained an elusive goal
  • What have seismologists learned from recent earthquakes in Haiti, Chile, and Japan?
A U.S. Geological Survey chemist evaporating sample extracts in laboratory hood to concentrate pesticide residues
April 20, 2011

A U.S. Geological Survey chemist evaporating sample extracts

Organic Chemistry Research Laboratory — Sacramento, California. USGS chemist working with samples in a laboratory hood

U.S. Geological Survey chemist homogenizes a tissue sample
April 18, 2011

U.S. Geological Survey chemist homogenizes a tissue sample

Organic Chemistry Research Laboratory — Sacramento, California. USGS chemist homogenizes a tissue sample into a mortar and pestle

March 31, 2011

PubTalk 3/2011 — Unraveling the Mystery of Avian Navigation

New research indicates that birds are listening to the landscape to find their way

By Jon Hagstrum, Research Geophysicist

  • For nearly 40 years, biologists have been unable to agree on how birds find their way over great distances during homing or migrational flights
  • Do birds use their olfactory senses, the Earth's
A sailboat has washed up onto the base of a bridge buttress and there are onlookers on bridge and sidewalk in background gawking
March 11, 2011

Japan tsunami of 2011 hits Santa Cruz yacht harbor

A sailboat gets stuck under the Murray Street bridge over Santa Cruz Harbor in California, after it was washed free of its dock due to the strength of the tsunami wave from Japan. While the tsunami energy that hit the coast of California was relatively low, the wave energy is concentrated in narrow spaces like harbors. The wave was strong enough to knock many boats free

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February 24, 2011

PubTalk 2/2011 — Is Our Coast in Jeopardy?

-predicting the impact of extreme storms on the California Coast

By Patrick Barnard, USGS Pacific Coastal & Marine Science Center

 

  • Extreme storms are expected to become more frequent and intense as a result of climate change
  • The USGS has developed the Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) for predicting
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USGS
May 27, 2004

A group of federal and university scientists today announced the launch of the Western Mountain Initiative, a 5-year effort funded by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to better understand ongoing changes in the mountains of the western United States.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 14, 2004

New U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) science reaffirms, with strong genetic evidence, that the northern spotted owl is a separate subspecies from California and Mexican spotted owls. The same study also found no significant genetic differences between Mexican and California spotted owls.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 14, 2004

America’s rivers and streams are generally suitable for irrigation, supplying drinking water, and home and recreational uses. However, in areas with significant agricultural and urban development, the quality of our nation’s water resources has been degraded by contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients, and gasoline-related compounds.

USGS
May 14, 2004

America’s rivers and streams are generally suitable for irrigation, supplying drinking water, and home and recreational uses. However, in areas with significant agricultural and urban development, the quality of our nation’s water resources has been degraded by contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients, and gasoline-related compounds.

USGS
May 14, 2004

New U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) science reaffirms, with strong genetic evidence, that the northern spotted owl is a separate subspecies from California and Mexican spotted owls. The same study also found no significant genetic differences between Mexican and California spotted owls.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 26, 2004

Farmlands, wetlands, forests and deserts that composed the American landscape in the early 20th century have frequently been transformed during the past 30 years into mushrooming metropolitan areas as urbanization spreads across the country.

USGS
April 26, 2004

Farmlands, wetlands, forests and deserts that composed the American landscape in the early 20th century have frequently been transformed during the past 30 years into mushrooming metropolitan areas as urbanization spreads across the country.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 19, 2004

In January of 1954, 120 employees of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) moved into what would be the first of many USGS buildings in Menlo Park. These USGS employees were previously stationed all around the western United States from San Francisco to Salt Lake City, and several were even commuting from our Washington DC office

USGS
April 19, 2004

In January of 1954, 120 employees of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) moved into what would be the first of many USGS buildings in Menlo Park. These USGS employees were previously stationed all around the western United States from San Francisco to Salt Lake City, and several were even commuting from our Washington DC office. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 14, 2004

Infectious disease outbreaks have increased in natural communities in several major groups of marine life during the past 30 years, suggests a new review of scientific literature by Cornell University and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 24, 2004

Migrating fall-run Chinook salmon can hit a stretch of the San Joaquin River in Central California with oxygen levels so low, the fish are forced to either wait around until conditions improve or to go elsewhere to spawn, thereby negatively affecting their spawning success.

USGS
February 24, 2004

Migrating fall-run Chinook salmon can hit a stretch of the San Joaquin River in Central California with oxygen levels so low, the fish are forced to either wait around until conditions improve or to go elsewhere to spawn, thereby negatively affecting their spawning success.