Unified Interior Regions

California

The Southwest Region includes California, Nevada, and Arizona. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 1,113
Image: California Brown Pelican
June 11, 2009

California Brown Pelican

Birds found in and around the Salton Sea, California.

Attribution:
Image: California Brown Pelican
June 11, 2009

California Brown Pelican

Birds found in and around the Salton Sea, California.

Image: California Brown Pelicans
June 11, 2009

California Brown Pelicans

Birds found in and around the Salton Sea, California.

Attribution:
Image: California Brown Pelicans
June 11, 2009

California Brown Pelicans

Birds found in and around the Salton Sea, California.

Attribution:
Image: California Brown Pelicans
June 11, 2009

California Brown Pelicans

Birds found in and around the Salton Sea, California.

Attribution:
Image: Snowy Egret, Great Blue Heron and Brown Pelican
June 11, 2009

Snowy Egret, Great Blue Heron and Brown Pelican at the Salton Sea

Birds found in and around the Salton Sea, California.

Attribution:
April 30, 2009

PubTalk 4/2009 — SOILS, CARBON, and Global exCHANGE

by Jennifer Harden, USGS Soil Scientist 

 

  • Studying Arctic Changes during the International Polar Year
  • Why soils aren't just for growing crops
  • What does carbon have to do with global weather and climate?
  • Balancing tradeoffs between the carbon cycle, econoic concerns, and the environment
  • Making choices
A bottomfish with small, bright spots lazily swims over a rocky seafloor among a few small pieces of kelp.
April 21, 2009

Kelp Greenling in Half Moon Bay

Kelp greenling fish, about 8 inches long, swims above a seafloor of mixed gravel, cobble, and rock near Half Moon Bay, California.

Image: Black-necked Stilt and American Avocet
April 18, 2009

Black-necked Stilt and American Avocet

Birds found in and around the Salton Sea, California.

Attribution:
March 26, 2009

PubTalk 3/2009 — Can our Western Forests Take the Heat?!

Climatic change and the future of forests in the western United States

By Philip van Mantgem, Ecologist

  • Tree death rates have more than doubled over the last few decades in old-growth forests of our western states, possibly reflecting increasing temperatures, with potentially serious consequences for wildlife, fire risks, and
February 26, 2009

PubTalk 2/2009 — Petroleum in the Arctic

Geology, Climate, and National Interests

By Donald L. Gautier, Geologist

 

  • For better or worse, technological advances and diminishing opportunities elsewhere make the Arctic increasingly attractive to oil and gas exploration. Retreating polar ice, shifting ecosystems, and heightened development potential are vital issues to the
February 19, 2009

PubTalk 2/2009 — A lecture by Martha A. Sandweiss on her latest book

Passing Strange: A Gilded Age Tale of Love and Deception Across the Color Line"

By Martha Sandweiss, Princeton University

 

  • After leading one of the four great surveys of the western U.S., Clarence King was appointed to be the first Director of the U.S. Geological Survey in 1879. For thirteen years he lived a double
Filter Total Items: 970
USGS
June 24, 2002

An international research team announced Monday it has begun drilling a 1.4-mile-deep hole along the San Andreas Fault near the Central California town of Parkfield - site of one of the longest ongoing earthquake experiments in the world.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 20, 2002

The application of the pesticide diazinon on orchards, and the amounts found in rivers and streams in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Basins in Northern California, were considerably lower in 2000 than in the 1990s according to two recently released reports by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

USGS
June 20, 2002

The application of the pesticide diazinon on orchards, and the amounts found in rivers and streams in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Basins in Northern California, were considerably lower in 2000 than in the 1990s according to two recently released reports by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 11, 2002

Equipped with binoculars and spotting scopes, scientists and skilled volunteers paired up onshore. Other crews were airborne. Together they scanned 375 miles along the California coast for sea otters during May, from Half Moon Bay south to Santa Barbara.

USGS
June 11, 2002

Equipped with binoculars and spotting scopes, scientists and skilled volunteers paired up onshore. Other crews were airborne. Together they scanned 375 miles along the California coast for sea otters during May, from Half Moon Bay south to Santa Barbara.

USGS
April 26, 2002

Unexploded shells. Contaminated soils. Polluted groundwater. Military bases across the country are working to restore and protect the environment.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 24, 2002

While it is known that pre-Columbian peoples of North America used fire as a tool to manage natural resources, scientists have long debated the impact of this usage of fire on the landscape. 

USGS
April 24, 2002

While it is known that pre-Columbian peoples of North America used fire as a tool to manage natural resources, scientists have long debated the impact of this usage of fire on the landscape.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 25, 2002

Above the water it’s a rugged shoreline and a few jagged rocks adorned with bird droppings. Below the surface, however, the Gulf of the Farallones, west of the Golden Gate Bridge, encompasses an area of 4,000 square miles of sea floor, marine life and mysterious objects that may be affecting the area’s environment.

USGS
February 25, 2002

Above the water it’s a rugged shoreline and a few jagged rocks adorned with bird droppings. Below the surface, however, the Gulf of the Farallones, west of the Golden Gate Bridge, encompasses an area of 4,000 square miles of sea floor, marine life and mysterious objects that may be affecting the area’s environment.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 6, 2002

The United States and the People’s Republic of China share a common problem ? elevated nitrate concentrations in water supplies used for drinking water, according to a recently released report by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). While elevated concentrations of nitrate in water have been known to cause illness in babies, there is also indirect evidence that they can cause cancer. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
January 30, 2002

University of Utah seismologists will be on duty around-the-clock during the Olympics, armed with a new $1.2 million system so they can quickly supply public safety information if any disruptive earthquakes shake the 2002 Winter Games.