Unified Interior Regions

California

The Southwest Region includes California, Nevada, and Arizona. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 1,076
Image: California Coast Seafloor
September 27, 2007

California Coast Seafloor

Photograph showing the seafloor off the California coast. This photograph supports the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), which was initiated in 2007 by the California Ocean Protection Council. Data collected during this project reveal the seafloor offshore of the California coast in unprecedented detail and provide an ecosystem context for the effective

...
Image: California Coast Seafloor
September 27, 2007

California Coast Seafloor

This photograph is of the seafloor off the California coast and shows rock outcrop, encrusting sponge, cup corals, red sea star and a female kelp greenling. This photograph supports the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), which was initiated in 2007 by the California Ocean Protection Council. Data collected during this project reveal the seafloor offshore of

...
September 27, 2007

PubTalk 9/2007 — A Tale of Two Kelp Forests

Sea Otters and Ecosystem Dynamics in the Aleutians and the Commander Islands

By Tim Tinker, Research Biologist, University of California, Santa Cruz 

Sea otter populations in the central and western Aleutian Islands have declined by 75-95% over the past 15-20 years, while populations in the nearby Russian Commander Islands have remained

August 30, 2007

PubTalk 8/2007 — Dark Holes in Muir's "Range of Light"

Insights from southern Sierra Nevada caves and karst

By John C. Tinsley, Geologist
 

  • Water long ago carved many caves in carbonate rocks of the Sierra Nevada
  • As the Sierra (John Muir's "Range of Light") was uplifted, successively deeper caves were drained and decorated during the past 5 million years
  • Vertical
July 26, 2007

PubTalk 7/2007 — Plate Tectonics in Action

Exploring the Earth with the new edition of This Dynamic Planet map and Web site

By Robert Tilling, Volcanologist, and Stephen Kirby, Earthquake Geophysicist
 

  • Improved digital data on the distribution of Earth's volcanoes, earthquakes, and meteorite impact craters
  • Special maps of polar regions, showing
June 28, 2007

PubTalk 6/2007 — Adventures in Southwest Geology

Exploring the colorful southern Colorado Plateau in 3-D

By Philip Stoffer, Geologist

Take a colorful tour with the help of 3-D photography through some of the region's highlights:

  • A plethora of parklands- Petrified Forest, Chaco Canyon, Wupatki, Grand Canyon
  • High desert climate changes, past, present, and
May 31, 2007

PubTalk 5/2007 — Alchemy in the Abyss

Probing the mysteries of deep-ocean minerals

By James R. Hein, Marine Geologist

  • Since President Reagan in 1983 extended U.S. mineral rights 200 nautical miles offshore, interest in deep-sea mining has increased
  • Massive sulfide deposits form rapidly at very hot ephemeral vents..black smokers. and .white smokers.
  • Slow-
April 26, 2007

PubTalk 4/2007 — Shock Waves

How the 1906 earthquake shook up California and science

A presentation of the award-winning USGS Video Shock Waves introduced by David Schwartz, Earthquake Geologist 

  • The 46-minute film Shock Waves includes dramatic historical footage, colorful animations, and interviews with earthquake experts
  • Shock Waves received
March 22, 2007

PubTalk 3/2007 — Impact!

Piecing together the story of a giant meteorite crater beneath the Atlantic coast

By David S. Powars, Geologist, and R.D. Catchings, Geophysicist

  • Buried under Chesapeake Bay is a very well preserved impact structure 56 miles across and more than 2 miles deep
  • Following clues from drill holes and seismic imagery, careful
Drill Rig Tender staged for departure from Lone Pine, California
March 20, 2007

Drill Rig Tender staged for departure from Lone Pine, California.

Drill Rig Tender staged for an early morning departure from Lone Pine after drilling a multiple-completion groundwater-monitoring well in Centennial Flats for the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

February 22, 2007

PubTalk 2/2007 — Riding the Storm

Landslide Danger in the Bay Area Hills

Peter Lyttle, National Landslide Hazards Program Coordinator,
will introduce the USGS premiere of the documentary
Riding the Storm by Karen Adams. A question-and answer session
with the producer, USGS researchers, and residents
featured in Riding the Storm will follow.

January 25, 2007

PubTalk 1/2007 — The Hidden World of the Golden Gate

How tides, currents, and humans have created an array of sea-floor features

By Patrick Barnard, Marine Geologist, and Peter Dartnell, Physical Scientist

  • A century of technical advances allow scientists to identify and visualize spectacular sea-bottom features
  • Recent collaborative research outside the Golden Gate found that 100
Filter Total Items: 963
USGS science for a changing world logo
July 26, 2001

 

Imagine the world’s oceans teeming with whales, sea turtles and fishes, with shellfish so abundant they posed a hazard to navigation. Only in a Jules Verne classic fantasy? Not so. A group of scientists from several research institutions has recently depicted that such rich ocean life existed in the not-so-distant past. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 12, 2001

Last year up; this year down, but the number of sea otters in California remain roughly stable, neither increasing or decreasing rapidly, according to the scientists who study them. Still, a lack of sustained growth worries researchers and sea otter watchers.

USGS
June 12, 2001

Note to news editors: View a summary of spring surveys of California sea otters for 1983-2001, and three-year averages at http://www.werc.usgs.gov/otters/ca-surveys.html. Information about sea otter mortality can be viewed at http://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/news/seaottrs.html.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 6, 2001

A newly released United States Geological Survey paper indicates that a significant zone of genetic mixing is occurring between northern spotted owls and California spotted owls, particularly in extreme northern California and southern Oregon.

USGS
June 6, 2001

A newly released United States Geological Survey paper indicates that a significant zone of genetic mixing is occurring between northern spotted owls and California spotted owls, particularly in extreme northern California and southern Oregon.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 11, 2001

While some folks may make a special effort to ride their bikes to work on the appointed day, May 17, it will be just another day to sit back and take it easy for John Fisher, who lives in Fremont and works as a cartographer at the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park.

USGS
May 11, 2001

While some folks may make a special effort to ride their bikes to work on the appointed day, May 17, it will be just another day to sit back and take it easy for John Fisher, who lives in Fremont and works as a cartographer at the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 30, 2001

A team of university, government, and private biologists have successfully spawned white abalone, a crucial step in developing a white abalone hatchery. Stocking of hatchery-reared white abalone is one of the possible strategies that may be used to rebuild the white abalone population, which is being considered for listing as an endangered species.

USGS
April 30, 2001

A team of university, government, and private biologists have successfully spawned white abalone, a crucial step in developing a white abalone hatchery. Stocking of hatchery-reared white abalone is one of the possible strategies that may be used to rebuild the white abalone population, which is being considered for listing as an endangered species.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 18, 2001

Following the great 1906 San Francisco earthquake, a large number of distant aftershocks or triggered earthquakes occurred much farther away from the fault than previously realized, according to scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 18, 2001

The most common information available immediately following an earthquake is the location and magnitude. However, what scientists really want to know is where the shaking was felt, and in the case of emergency response, where it shook the most. Two new systems can now answer these questions within minutes following an earthquake. Both are available on the Internet.

USGS
April 18, 2001

Following the great 1906 San Francisco earthquake, a large number of distant aftershocks or triggered earthquakes occurred much farther away from the fault than previously realized, according to scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey.