Unified Interior Regions

California

The Southwest Region includes California, Nevada, and Arizona. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 1,107
June 26, 2008

PubTalk 6/2008 — Cleanup on Aisle 9

The Long Lasting Legacy of Nuclear Waste

Dave Stonestrom, USGS Research Hydrologist

 

  • Radioactive wastes:
    • Where do they come from?
    • How do we get rid of them?
  • Once buried, do the wastes stay put?
  • What are the risks of off-site migration?
  • How does basic research inform
May 22, 2008

PubTalk 5/2008 — Global Warming

Western Style

Michael Dettinger, USGS Research Hydrologist

 

  • Increasing atmospheric greenhouse gases are linked to a rise in global temperture of almost 1.5° F
  • Is climate change already affecting Western lands and waters?
  • What changes predicted by climate models are still to come -- when will they be
April 24, 2008

PubTalk 4/2008 — The Hayward Fault in Google Earth

Visualizing Past, Present, and Future Earthquakes

USGS scientists David Schwartz, Heather Lackey, Luke Blair, and Scott Haefner take you on a virtual tour of the Bay Area's most urbanized fault

 

  • Explore the destructive 1868 Hayward earthquake and today's earthquake hazards using Google Earth
  • Nearly 2.4 million
Photo of waterbirds feeding at a flooded agricultural field.
March 31, 2008

Waterbirds Feeding at Flooded Field

Credit Douglas Barnum/USGS. A photo of white-faced ibis and gulls feeding on a flooded agricultural field post-harvest. 

Cow in field
March 28, 2008

Cattle on rangeland on Mission Peak, near Fremont, CA.

Cattle on rangeland on Mission Peak, near Fremont, California, in the San Francisco Bay area. David Amme, California Native Grasslands Association.

March 27, 2008

PubTalk 3/2008 — Wetland Revival

Restoring San Francisco Bay Salt Ponds to Wetlands Habitat

A video production introduced and discussed by Steven E. Schwarzbach, Director, USGS Western Ecological Research Center

Nearly 15,000 acres of salt ponds in the southern San Francisco bay were purchased in 2003 for restoration by a partnership of Federal, State, and nonprofit

Image: California Brown Pelicans
March 20, 2008

California Brown Pelicans

Birds found in and around the Salton Sea, California.

Attribution:
February 28, 2008

PubTalk 2/2008 — Alaska's Rivers of Ice

USGS scientist Bruce Molnia, discusses the impact of changing climate and conditions on Earth's glaciers

By Bruce Molnia, Geologist

See excerpts from this full-length film feature showing:

  • How and where glaciers form
  • How scientists study glaciers and climate
  • The processes of glacial erosion and
January 31, 2008

PubTalk 1/2008 — The Indonesian Mud Crisis

Long-lived mud "eruption" inundates housing and infrastructure

By Thomas J. Casadevall, Geologist

In May, 2006 hot, dark mud appeared from a fissure covering more than 10 square kilometers, displacing more than 30,000 people. The ongoing mud extrusion has also damaged or broken important transportation and communication infrastructure,

Photograph of Natural Bridges State Beach, Santa Cruz, CA
January 21, 2008

Natural Bridges State Beach, Santa Cruz, California

Photograph of the coastal region of Natural Bridges State Beach in Santa Cruz, California

A large poster has photos, maps, and text on it to show what research was done in Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz, California.
December 31, 2007

Does Pleasure Point Need a Seawall?

The USGS, in cooperation with Santa Cruz County and the California Department of Boating and Waterways, studied the seacliffs, ocean floor, and waves of Pleasure Point, California.   We created detailed maps of the seacliffs and ocean floor using LIDAR laser scanners and sonar. We measured wave action using digital photos and videos, a wave gauge, and a current meter. We

...
December 13, 2007

PubTalk 12/2007 — Exploring Antarctica's Frozen Frontier

The USGS Antarctic Program from the 1957 International
Geophysical Year to the 2007 International Polar Year

By Jerry Mullins, Coordinator, USGS Antarctic, Arctic and Canadian Programs
and John Behrendt, USGS Geophysicist Emeritus

 

 

  • Learn about USGS surveying and mapping of "The Frozen Continent"
Filter Total Items: 984
USGS science for a changing world logo
July 26, 2001

 

Imagine the world’s oceans teeming with whales, sea turtles and fishes, with shellfish so abundant they posed a hazard to navigation. Only in a Jules Verne classic fantasy? Not so. A group of scientists from several research institutions has recently depicted that such rich ocean life existed in the not-so-distant past. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 12, 2001

Last year up; this year down, but the number of sea otters in California remain roughly stable, neither increasing or decreasing rapidly, according to the scientists who study them. Still, a lack of sustained growth worries researchers and sea otter watchers.

USGS
June 12, 2001

Note to news editors: View a summary of spring surveys of California sea otters for 1983-2001, and three-year averages at http://www.werc.usgs.gov/otters/ca-surveys.html. Information about sea otter mortality can be viewed at http://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/news/seaottrs.html.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 6, 2001

A newly released United States Geological Survey paper indicates that a significant zone of genetic mixing is occurring between northern spotted owls and California spotted owls, particularly in extreme northern California and southern Oregon.

USGS
June 6, 2001

A newly released United States Geological Survey paper indicates that a significant zone of genetic mixing is occurring between northern spotted owls and California spotted owls, particularly in extreme northern California and southern Oregon.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 11, 2001

While some folks may make a special effort to ride their bikes to work on the appointed day, May 17, it will be just another day to sit back and take it easy for John Fisher, who lives in Fremont and works as a cartographer at the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park.

USGS
May 11, 2001

While some folks may make a special effort to ride their bikes to work on the appointed day, May 17, it will be just another day to sit back and take it easy for John Fisher, who lives in Fremont and works as a cartographer at the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 30, 2001

A team of university, government, and private biologists have successfully spawned white abalone, a crucial step in developing a white abalone hatchery. Stocking of hatchery-reared white abalone is one of the possible strategies that may be used to rebuild the white abalone population, which is being considered for listing as an endangered species.

USGS
April 30, 2001

A team of university, government, and private biologists have successfully spawned white abalone, a crucial step in developing a white abalone hatchery. Stocking of hatchery-reared white abalone is one of the possible strategies that may be used to rebuild the white abalone population, which is being considered for listing as an endangered species.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 18, 2001

Following the great 1906 San Francisco earthquake, a large number of distant aftershocks or triggered earthquakes occurred much farther away from the fault than previously realized, according to scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 18, 2001

The most common information available immediately following an earthquake is the location and magnitude. However, what scientists really want to know is where the shaking was felt, and in the case of emergency response, where it shook the most. Two new systems can now answer these questions within minutes following an earthquake. Both are available on the Internet.

USGS
April 18, 2001

Following the great 1906 San Francisco earthquake, a large number of distant aftershocks or triggered earthquakes occurred much farther away from the fault than previously realized, according to scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey.