Unified Interior Regions

California

The Southwest Region includes California, Nevada, and Arizona. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 974
November 21, 2002

PubTalk 11/2002 — What is a Butterfly Worth?

Challenge of Making Economic Estimates for Biodiversity

by Alicia Torregrosa, Geographer and Ecologist

 

  • How can we best strike a balance between vineyard development and wildlife in the Napa Valley?
  • Geographic Information System (GIS) facilitates comparing the "apples and oranges" of endangered species and the
Image: California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus)
October 31, 2002

California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus)

California sea lions on a platform.

Attribution: Ecosystems
Image: California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus)
October 31, 2002

California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus)

California sea lions on a platform.

Attribution: Ecosystems
Image: California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus)
October 31, 2002

California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus)

California sea lions on a platform.

Attribution: Ecosystems
Image: California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus)
October 31, 2002

California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus)

California sea lions on a platform.

Attribution: Ecosystems
Image: California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus)
October 31, 2002

California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus)

California sea lions on a platform.

Attribution: Ecosystems
October 24, 2002

PubTalk 10/2002 — Plumbing the Mysteries of the San Andreas Fault

Deep Drilling to Test Fundamental Theories About Faulting and Earthquakes

By Stephen H. Hickman, Geophysicist

 

  • Scientists will make measurements, obtain samples and place instruments directly within the fault at a depth of 2.5 miles, creating the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD)
  • SAFOD's instruments
View from the sky looking at a very high coastal cliff with gentle waves.
September 30, 2002

Coastal cliffs near Fort Funston in 2002

Photograph of a coastal cliff where a large landslide occurred between 2002 and 2010. This photo, taken in 2002, shows the cliff before the landslide.

September 26, 2002

PubTalk 9/2002 — Healing the Redwood Creek Watershed

Successes and Failures in a Large-scale Watershed Restoration Program

by Mary Ann Madej, Geologist

 

  • Can we undo the effects of decades of logging and road-building on salmon habitat and redwood forest?
  • The Redwood Creek restoration program in California--one of the Nation.s largest and longest-running watershed
August 29, 2002

PubTalk 8/2002 — Revealing the Hidden World Beneath Monterey Bay

Explore the diverse features on and below the sea floor in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

by Steve Eittreim, Marine Geologist

 

  • See---
    • Drowned bedrock pinnacles that provide shelter for rockfish
    • Earthquake faults that slice through the sea floor
    • New, highly detailed views of the
July 25, 2002

PubTalk 7/2002 — Beyond the Golden Gate

Oceanography, Geology, Biology, and Environmental Issues In The Gulf of the Farallones

by Herman A. Karl, Marine Geologist, and Edward Ueber, Director, Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary

 

  • Learn about the complex marine geology offshore from the San Francisco Bay region
  • Hear the story of the 47,000
June 27, 2002

PubTalk 6/2002 — Finding Elusive Earthquake Faults

New Mapping Techniques Reveal Potential Seismic Sources Beneath Seattle

By Richard J. Blakely, Geophysicist and Ralph A. Haugerud, Geologist

 

  • Geophysical methods reveal "the landscape beneath the landscape"
  • Why does the Seattle Fault exist, and why is it so hard to locate and map?
  • LIDAR imagery can
Filter Total Items: 932
USGS
March 22, 2000

The most acidic waters ever measured are percolating through an underground mine near Redding, Calif., according to scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS
March 15, 2000

Recent rains may have made things unstable on some parts of San Bruno Mountain, south of San Francisco, but one fault the mountain doesn’t have is a fault; at least none that will cause any problems, according to scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS
February 29, 2000

If certain employees of the U.S. Geological Survey are begging for used tennis balls, it must mean that something big is brewing. And it is.

USGS
January 24, 2000

On January 26, 1700, the largest earthquake known to have occurred in the "lower 48" United States, rocked Cascadia, a region 600 miles long that includes northern California, Oregon, Washington, and southern British Columbia.

USGS
December 16, 1999

The U.S. Geological Survey still needs a few good back yards. Beginning in January 2000, the USGS Earthquake Hazards Team, in cooperation the seismographic Station at UC Berkeley, will begin installing 60-70 seismograph stations in the core urban areas of San Francisco, Oakland and Berkeley.

USGS
December 9, 1999

Holocene muds that cover the Santa Cruz, Calif., continental shelf have enough breaks to reveal traces of the San Gregorio fault, according to scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey, who will present several papers relating to the side-scan sonar images that were obtained earlier this year.

USGS
December 8, 1999

The Moscone convention center will be alive with the sound of music, Thursday, Dec. 16, as U.S. Geological Survey geophysicist Andrew Michael presents, "The Music of Earthquakes -- Waveforms of Sound and Seismology."

USGS
November 22, 1999

All offices of the U.S. Geological Survey, at 345 Middlefield Road in Menlo Park, will close at 2 p.m., Wednesday, November 24, but will be open to serve the public Friday, November 26. This includes the map sales office and the USGS library.

USGS
October 22, 1999

Southern California’s deserts have been profoundly altered since the arrival of modern civilization and it may take centuries for the harsh but fragile ecosystem to recover even with vigorous intervention to restore natural habitats, according to an article in the current issue of the journal Environmental Management.

USGS
October 21, 1999

Recent devastating earthquakes have impacted Turkey, Taiwan, and Mexico. If the epicenter of last weeks 7.1 Hector earthquake in the Mojave Desert had occurred 100 miles to the east or to the west, Las Vegas or Los Angeles would still be picking up the pieces.

USGS
October 19, 1999

White abalone - 1,000 to 5,000 per acre - were easy to find in the early 1970s around the Channel Islands off California’s southern coast. But by the late 1970s, intense commercial and recreational harvesting made the abalone as difficult to locate a needle in an ocean-sized haystack.

USGS
October 14, 1999

There is a 70 percent probability that one or more damaging earthquakes of magnitude 6.7 or larger will strike the San Francisco Bay area during the next 30 years, according to a report released today (Oct. 14, 1999) by the U.S. Geological Survey. A magnitude 6.7 earthquake is equivalent to the 1994 Northridge earthquake which killed 57 people and caused $20 billion in damage.