Unified Interior Regions

California

The Southwest Region includes California, Nevada, and Arizona. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 1,077
Photograph shows eroding cliff in Isla Vista, California, with parts of houses hanging over edge.
April 28, 2005

Homes along the edge of the coast in Isla Vista, California

Homes along the edge of the coast in Isla Vista, California, Santa Barbara County, face a short lifespan because of eroding bluffs that support them.

March 31, 2005

PubTalk — Commotions in the Oceans

USGS Shipboard Research Sparked Scientific Advances

By William R. Normark, and
David W. Scholl, Marine Geologists

  • Alaskan work from the Survey's M/V Eider in the 1950's led to visualizing how great earthquakes and tsunamis originate along trenches
  • In the 1970's, researchers discovered deep-sea "black
February 24, 2005

PubTalk — When Rocks Fall and the Land Slides

Hear why California makes an ideal environment for landslides North face

By Gerald F. Wieczorek, Geological Engineer, and
Raymond C. Wilson, Landslide Geologist

  • Hear why California makes an ideal environment for landslides North face
  • Learn about rock falls, debris flows, and other landslides Rocks fall
January 29, 2005

PubTalk 1/2005 — Deciphering an Estuarine Ecosystem

35 Years of San Francisco Bay Studies

By John Conomos, Scientist Emeritus

 

  • USGS research in the Bay system began in the 1960s with a search for underwater earthquake faults
  • In the 1970s, the research team expanded to cover studies of water properties and quality, water mixing and flow, and estuarine ecology
Moutain Diablo in the early morning
December 31, 2004

Mt. Diablo from Suisun Marsh

Picturesque view of Mt.Diablo early in the morning from Suisun Marsh.

Attribution:
map of California shaded by GAMA deep aquifer study units
December 31, 2004

GAMA Public-supply Well (Deep Aquifer) Assessment Study Units

The GAMA program is a comprehensive assessment of statewide groundwater quality. The program is designed to help better understand and identify risks to groundwater resources. Groundwater is sampled at many locations across California in order to characterize its constituents and identify trends in groundwater quality. The results of these tests provide information for

...
Poster laid out with photos, images, and text.
December 31, 2004

Big Sur Coastal Landslides

Large-scale poster describing USGS work.

The USGS studied air photos of the Big Sur coast taken in 1942 and 1994, in cooperation with the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) and the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC).

We used the photographs to create 3D computer models. By comparing the two models, we can see the differences caused

...
This poster shows information about the greater San Francisco Bay area, with text that talks about our research in the area.
December 31, 2004

Oceanography Beyond the Golden Gate

Large-scale poster describing USGS work.

The USGS measured ocean currents and temperatures off Central California as part of an international group of Federal, State, Academic, and private institutions. The project was part of a larger study that took nearly 14 years to finish. This group also studied geology, biology, and environmental issues in the Gulf of the

...
Poster with illustrations of the underwater part of the ocean, with text about the work done in the area.
December 31, 2004

Tsunami Hazards in the Santa Barbara Channel

Large-scale poster describing USGS work.

The USGS, in cooperation with Moss Landing Marine Laboratory, mapped the slopes of the Santa Barbara Channel using sonar. We combined this with deep sea drilling records and seismic records to make these maps.

Large earthquakes can cause the very large underwater landslides that we found in the channel. These

...
November 18, 2004

PubTalk 11/2004 — From Plane Tables to Pixels

The Revolution in Mapping at the U.S. Geological Survey

by Susan P. Benjamin, Research Geographer

  • Mapping the United States in the 19th century was arduous, dangerous work; flash floods, bears, and bandits were just a few hazards
  • By the mid-20th century, aerial photography, photogrammetry, and stereophoto pairs, allowed
October 30, 2004

PubTalk 10/2004 — Hot Oil, Frozen Ground, and Earthquakes

The Trans-Alaska Pipeline story-- so far, so good!

by George Gryc, Arthur Lachenbruch, and Robert Page, Scientists Emeriti

  • The 1968 discovery of North America.s largest oil fi eld on the Arctic coast posed the challenge of an 800-mile pipeline to carry hot oil across mountains, rivers, and the giant Denali Fault
  • The oil
Attribution: Region 11: Alaska
Filter Total Items: 965
USGS
January 24, 2000

On January 26, 1700, the largest earthquake known to have occurred in the "lower 48" United States, rocked Cascadia, a region 600 miles long that includes northern California, Oregon, Washington, and southern British Columbia.

USGS
December 16, 1999

The U.S. Geological Survey still needs a few good back yards. Beginning in January 2000, the USGS Earthquake Hazards Team, in cooperation the seismographic Station at UC Berkeley, will begin installing 60-70 seismograph stations in the core urban areas of San Francisco, Oakland and Berkeley.

USGS
December 9, 1999

Holocene muds that cover the Santa Cruz, Calif., continental shelf have enough breaks to reveal traces of the San Gregorio fault, according to scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey, who will present several papers relating to the side-scan sonar images that were obtained earlier this year.

USGS
December 8, 1999

The Moscone convention center will be alive with the sound of music, Thursday, Dec. 16, as U.S. Geological Survey geophysicist Andrew Michael presents, "The Music of Earthquakes -- Waveforms of Sound and Seismology."

USGS
November 22, 1999

All offices of the U.S. Geological Survey, at 345 Middlefield Road in Menlo Park, will close at 2 p.m., Wednesday, November 24, but will be open to serve the public Friday, November 26. This includes the map sales office and the USGS library.

USGS
October 22, 1999

Southern California’s deserts have been profoundly altered since the arrival of modern civilization and it may take centuries for the harsh but fragile ecosystem to recover even with vigorous intervention to restore natural habitats, according to an article in the current issue of the journal Environmental Management.

USGS
October 21, 1999

Recent devastating earthquakes have impacted Turkey, Taiwan, and Mexico. If the epicenter of last weeks 7.1 Hector earthquake in the Mojave Desert had occurred 100 miles to the east or to the west, Las Vegas or Los Angeles would still be picking up the pieces.

USGS
October 19, 1999

White abalone - 1,000 to 5,000 per acre - were easy to find in the early 1970s around the Channel Islands off California’s southern coast. But by the late 1970s, intense commercial and recreational harvesting made the abalone as difficult to locate a needle in an ocean-sized haystack.

USGS
October 14, 1999

There is a 70 percent probability that one or more damaging earthquakes of magnitude 6.7 or larger will strike the San Francisco Bay area during the next 30 years, according to a report released today (Oct. 14, 1999) by the U.S. Geological Survey. A magnitude 6.7 earthquake is equivalent to the 1994 Northridge earthquake which killed 57 people and caused $20 billion in damage.

USGS
October 8, 1999

A new set of maps from the U.S. Geological Survey explains in depth, literally, more than 30,000 earthquakes that occurred in north-central California between 1967 and 1993. That time frame, of course, includes the largest earthquake to occur in the area since 1906, the 1989, 6.9 Loma Prieta earthquake.

USGS
October 8, 1999

When is a badly damaged, but stable building safe to enter after an earthquake? That is a question that safety-response and building-department officials have to answer in order to let occupants retrieve important possessions and business records, and to let contractors begin emergency repairs

USGS
October 5, 1999

When their offices and homes began shaking at 5:04 p.m., Oct. 17, 1989, earthquake scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, Calif., were as surprised as anyone.