Unified Interior Regions

Florida

World class scientists working in Southeast Region Science Centers help our partners understand and manage complex issues including competition for limited water resources, coastal hazards, mineral and energy resource extraction, degraded ecosystems, vector-borne diseases, rapidly changing land use, and response to climate change.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 184
Date published: September 18, 2018
Status: Active

Joint Ecosystem Modeling: Wader Distribution & Evaluation Modeling (WADEM)

WADEM (Wader Distribution Evaluation Modeling) is a JEM model that estimates species-specific habitat suitability across the landscape for Great Egret (Ardea alba), White Ibis (Eudocimus albus), and Wood Stork (Mycteria americana).

Date published: August 29, 2018
Status: Active

Environmental and Public Health Microbiology — St. Petersburg, Florida

About the Research

The Environmental Health Program collaboartes with microbiologists at the Environmental and Public Health Microbiology Laboratory (EPHML) develop analytical methods for the identification and quantitation of pathogenic microorganisms that can impact the health of humans and other organisms. This laboratory also develops methods for accessing aquatic,...

Date published: August 20, 2018
Status: Active

Wetlands in the Quaternary Project

Wetlands accumulate organic-rich sediment or peat stratigraphically, making them great archives of past environmental change. Wetlands also act as hydrologic buffers on the landscape and are important to global biogeochemical cycling. This project uses wetland archives from a range of environments to better understand how vegetation, hydrology, and hydroclimate has changed on decadal to multi-...

Date published: August 9, 2018
Status: Active

Gulf Coast Petroleum Systems Project - Assessments

This site highlights the assessments of the Gulf Coast Petroleum Systems Project.   Scientifically robust assessments of undiscovered, technically recoverable hydrocarbon resources are published in a variety of USGS publications.  This project also conducts research on the processes that impact the formation, accumulation, occurrence and alteration of hydrocarbon energy resources. The Gulf...

Date published: August 2, 2018
Status: Active

Integrating Science and Management for Optimal Prevention and Control of Invasive Nymphoides in Florida

Two invasive species of floating hearts, Nymphoides cristata and N. indica, are actively managed in Florida. A rare native species, N. humboldtiana, has been found in Florida and verified by molecular methods; this species is nearly indistinguishable from N. indica.

Date published: June 14, 2018
Status: Completed

Hurricane Matthew: Flood Resources and Tools

During and after Hurricane Matthew, the USGS made flood-flow measurements, maintained streamgages, deployed over 390 instruments, and developed geospatial products to measure and communicate the extent of coastal and inland flooding.

Date published: May 10, 2018
Status: Active

Joint Ecosystem Modeling: Cape Sable Seaside Sparrow Marl Prairie Indicator

Marl prairie is the most diverse freshwater vegetation community in the Greater Everglades and provides the only suitable habitat for the federally endangered Cape Sable seaside sparrow (CSSS; Ammodramus maritimus mirabilis).

Date published: May 10, 2018
Status: Active

Joint Ecosystem Modeling: EverSnail

EverSnail, developed in collaboration with the University of West Florida, is an age- and size-structured spatially-explicit landscape model of native apple snails (Pomacea paludosa).

Date published: May 10, 2018
Status: Active

Joint Ecosystem Modeling: Alligator Production Probability Model

Because the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is a keystone species of the Everglades ecosystem, managers need a way to quantitatively assess the effects of alternative restoration scenarios on alligators.

Date published: May 7, 2018
Status: Active

Sea turtle nesting on Eglin Air Force Base property, Cape San Blas, Florida

The Northwestern Atlantic population of loggerhead sea turtles is one of the largest in the world. Genetic studies have divided this population into 5 management units including a genetically distinct group that nests throughout the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoM).

Date published: April 30, 2018
Status: Active

Mapping Florida's Coastal Waters

The FCMaP approach divides Florida into 6 regions that are geologically and physiographically distinct in terms of coastal characteristic.

Date published: April 2, 2018
Status: Completed

Heavy-Mineral Sand Resources in the Southeastern U.S.

We are assessing the extent of industrial mineral resources hosted by heavy-mineral sands in the coastal plain of the southeastern United States. “Heavy-mineral sands" (HMS) is a term commonly used in industry and geologic literature to describe layered sediments deposited in coastal environments that contain dense (“heavy") minerals of economic value. The heavy minerals extracted from these...

Filter Total Items: 326
December 31, 2019

Wonderful Watery Wetlands - Part 2 (AD)

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey Wetland and Aquatic Research Center (www.usgs.gov/warc) study important aspects of wetlands, such as the flow and quality of water, the chemistry of soil, and the plants and animals which call this ecosystem home. In this video, we learn about the variety of ways water can be studied, and how

December 31, 2019

Wonderful Watery Wetlands - Part 2

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey Wetland and Aquatic Research Center (www.usgs.gov/warc) study important aspects of wetlands, such as the flow and quality of water, the chemistry of soil, and the plants and animals which call this ecosystem home. In this video, we learn about the variety of ways water can be studied, and how

December 31, 2019

Digging into the soil of wetlands (AD)

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey Wetland and Aquatic Research Center study important aspects of wetlands, such as the flow and quality of water, the chemistry of soil, and the plants and animals which call this ecosystem home. In this video, we explore the world beneath our feet by taking a close look at the anaerobic soils

December 31, 2019

Digging into the soil of wetlands

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey Wetland and Aquatic Research Center (www.usgs.gov/warc) study important aspects of wetlands, such as the flow and quality of water, the chemistry of soil, and the plants and animals which call this ecosystem home. In this video, we explore the world beneath our feet by taking a close look at

December 8, 2019

How Our Reefs Protect Us: Valuing the Benefits of U.S. Reefs (AD)

The degradation of coastal habitats, particularly coral reefs, raises risks by increasing the exposure of coastal communities to flooding hazards during storms. The protective services of these natural defenses are not assessed in the same rigorous economic terms as artificial defenses, such as seawalls, and therefore often are not considered in decision-making. Here we

Panoramic view of sampling site in Everglades
December 3, 2019

Panoramic view of sampling site in Everglades

Panoramic view of USGS employees at a sampling site in Florida Everglades.

Satellite imagery of eastern berm of Jim Foot Key in Florida Bay before Hurricane Irma and after
November 30, 2019

Impacts to island in Florida Bay following Hurricane Irma

Scientists from the Florence Bascom Geoscience Center first sampled four islands in Florida Bay, Everglades National Park, in April 2014 to collect cores to study sea level rise and storm history in the region.  In September 2017, Hurricane Irma (a category 4 storm at landfall in the Florida Keys) passed just to the west of our field sites.  The western-most of the four

...
November 21, 2019

Using Decision Tools to Design the Everglades Headwaters NWR

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (FWS) Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge (EHNWR) is strategically located in Florida to protect upland and wetland habitats. The location of the new refuge was targeted to: address pressures from urbanization and climate change, provide improved quality of water flowing southward to the Greater Everglades, and protect

Two scientists use a cylinder to collect mud in a grassy marsh
October 16, 2019

USGS geologists study sediment exchange in estuary and marshes

Sediments in estuarine and marsh environments contain organic peat, or material derived from life, that plays an important role in ecosystem health. Here, USGS geologist Chris Smith of the St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center uses a peat auger, a type of coring apparatus, to extract peat cores from the mud

...
October 11, 2019

Earth as Art 6

The Earth As Art project began in the early 2000s, and its original intent remains the same: to produce images that do not look like satellite images at first glance. Earth As Art shows not only what satellites capture in the visible wavelengths of light you and I can see, but also what’s hiding in the invisible wavelengths that Landsat sensors can detect in the infrared

Florida waterfront with storm-tide sensor attached to piling
August 30, 2019

Scientists track Hurricane Dorian effects on Low Country Coast

A storm-tide sensor deployed on Florida's Indian River Lagoon, at Indian River Drive in St. Lucie County, on Aug. 30, 2019 in preparation for Hurricane Dorian. NOTE: Though the story is about the Carolinas, the photo is from Florida. No photos of the Carolinas deployment were available at the time this story was published.

An invasive Cuban treefrog in New Orleans, LA.
August 23, 2019

Outstanding in the Field (Ep 4): Amphibian Surveys – Call of the Frog

The USGS Ecosystems Mission Area brings you Outstanding in the Field, a series of stories about our science, our adventures, and our efforts to better understand our fish and wildlife and the ecosystems that support them. In this episode we describe the USGS’s efforts to track frog populations in the southeast United States. 
 

Filter Total Items: 244
Boat thrown onto land from Hurricane Irma's surge at a ramp in St. Augustine, Florida
September 19, 2017

Editor’s note: this news release will be updated online with more information on the streamgage records being set in Florida as it becomes available

Preparing to measure Irma's storm surge in Puerto Rico
September 6, 2017

 To learn more about USGS’ role providing science to decision makers before, during and after Hurricane Irma, visit the USGS Hurricane Irma page.

Sensor deployment
September 6, 2017

To learn more about USGS’ role providing science to decision makers before, during and after Hurricane Irma, visit the USGS Hurricane Irma page.

Microscope image of Dolichospermum circinale, a cyanobacteria found in last year's Florida harmful algal bloom.
May 31, 2017

A new U.S. Geological Survey study that looked at the extensive harmful algal bloom that plagued Florida last year found far more types of cyanobacteria present than previously known.

Prescribed Burn at Tall Timbers Research Station
May 24, 2017

U.S. Geological Survey scientists and partners are taking technology to the next level, using unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), commonly called drones, to acquire both fire intensity and emissions data during prescribed burns.

A healthy coral reef at Buck Island, U.S. Virgin Island
April 20, 2017

In the first ecosystem-wide study of changing sea depths at five large coral reef tracts in Florida, the Caribbean and Hawai’i, U.S. Geological Survey researchers found the sea floor is eroding in all five places, and the reefs cannot keep pace with sea level rise. As a result, coastal communities protected by the reefs are facing increased risks from storms, waves and erosion.

A Manatee swimming in Florida waters.
April 11, 2017

Florida’s iconic manatee population is highly likely to endure for the next 100 years, so long as wildlife managers continue to protect the marine mammals and their habitat, a new study by the US Geological Survey and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute has found.