Unified Interior Regions

Florida

World class scientists working in Southeast Region Science Centers help our partners understand and manage complex issues including competition for limited water resources, coastal hazards, mineral and energy resource extraction, degraded ecosystems, vector-borne diseases, rapidly changing land use, and response to climate change.

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Filter Total Items: 184
Date published: April 17, 2014

Use of Amphibian Communities as Indicators of Restoration Success in the Greater Everglades

Habitat alteration and climate, when combined, are serious threats to amphibians and other wildlife. Habitat suitability models are being used to predict the responses of an amphibian community to hydrological and habitat restoration in the Greater Everglades Ecosystem. 

Date published: February 27, 2013
Status: Active

Webinar: Preliminary Results from “La Florida” - A Land of Flowers on a Latitude of Deserts

View this webinar to learn more about climate modeling techniques used by ecologists to predict the impacts of climate change on Floridian wildlife.

Contacts: Dr. Thomas Smith
Date published: April 17, 2009

Integrative Studies of Florida Spring Ecosystems

Florida's springs are a source of cultural, recreational, and ecological importance. But land-use changes and increased demands for groundwater due to the state's growing population have led to widespread impairment of these unique ecosystems. 

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A diver peeks from behind a badly bleached coral in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary in October 2015
October 12, 2015

Bleached mountainous star coral at Hen and Chickens Sanctuary

A diver peeks from behind a badly bleached coral in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary in October 2015. Coral bleaching events caused by abnormally warm ocean temperatures continue to regularly claim the lives of coral populations around the globe. 

Acoustic Doppler current profiler
September 10, 2015

Acoustic Doppler current profiler, Manatee Strings, Florida

An acoustic Doppler current profiler is being used to measure discharge at Manatee Springs, Florida.

Red mangrove wood in a peat core from a Florida Bay island
April 15, 2015

Mangrove wood, mud in a core reveal Florida Bay changes

A slice of a piston core containing wood and plant material from Russell Key in Florida Bay, Everglades National Park, April 18, 2014. The large piece of wood is from a red mangrove. Photo: USGS

Mangroves and mud flats on island in Florida Bay
April 14, 2015

Mangroves form a protective berm on a Florida Bay island

The transition between a mud flat on the interior of Bob Allen Key (Florida Bay, Everglades National Park) and the mangroves that form the islands’ protective outer berm.  These black mangroves have pneumatophores – parts of the root that function like snorkels, allowing the roots to “breathe” when water overlies the mud flat. Photo: Anna Wachnicka, FIU

Michelle Collier of the USGS holding a black and white Tegu lizard.
December 31, 2014

Michelle Collier of the USGS holding a black and white Tegu

Invasive Species biological science technician Michelle Collier holds an invasive black and white Tegu lizard. 

Aerial Photographs of coastal area with lots of houses Key Largo, Florida
September 8, 2014

Aerial Photographs Collected from Key Largo, Florida

Baseline Coastal Oblique Aerial Photographs Collected from Key Largo, Florida, to the Florida/Georgia Border, September 5-6, 2014

View south/southeast along eastern shoreline in April 2014 shows a dense berm of mangrove trees. 
April 30, 2014

Berm at Jim Foot Key, Florida (2014)

In Photo: View south/southeast along eastern shoreline in April 2014 shows a dense berm of mangrove trees.  The bay is not visible. 

Scientists from the Florence Bascom Geoscience Center first sampled four islands in Florida Bay, Everglades National Park, in April 2014 to collect cores to study sea level rise and storm history in the region.  In September 2017,

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Field crews on a Florida Bay island
April 14, 2014

Florida Bay island sediments reveal past, may foretell future

Field crew on Bob Allen Key in Florida Bay, Everglades National Park, April 14, 2014, conferring on next steps near core sites marked with orange flags.  The mangroves that form the islands’ perimeter are to the left and in the background. Photo: Anna Wachnicka, FIU [left to right: Lynn Wingard, Marci Marot, Christopher Bernhardt, Terry McCloskey, and James Murray,

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USGS diver taking a core of a 100-year-old coral in USVI
August 19, 2013

USGS diver taking a core of a 100-year-old coral in USVI

USGS diver taking a core of a 100-year-old coral to allow reconstruction of past ocean temperatures in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands.

A scuba diver underwater with scientific equipment
January 4, 2013

Legna Torres-Garcia

USGS Graduate Research Assistant Legna Torres-Garcia installs a temperature logger on a coral reef in Dry Tortugas National Park. She and her team deployed a vertical array with temperature loggers every 1m from the seabed to near-surface with the goal to capture any changes in temperature through time and across depth. One of the most impactful stressors directly causing

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USGS science for a changing world logo
September 11, 2006

If you were surprised by the strong magnitude 6.0 earthquake that shook offshore Florida yesterday morning you're not alone.

This event was centered far offshore -- about 250 miles south-southwest of Apalachicola, Fla. 

USGS
August 23, 2006

A West Indian manatee has been sighted in various waters of the northeastern United States in the last 5-6 weeks. It took in the sights along the Hudson River traveling up into Harlem, visited Cape Cod, Mass., and was most recently sighted in Warwick, Rhode Island, in Greenwich Bay.

USGS science for a changing world logo
August 22, 2006

Declines in water levels in the Apalachicola River in Florida´s panhandle occurred over the past 50 years as a result of erosion of the river channel and decreased spring and summer flow from upstream, according to a report released today by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

USGS
August 22, 2006

Declines in water levels in the Apalachicola River in Florida´s panhandle occurred over the past 50 years as a result of erosion of the river channel and decreased spring and summer flow from upstream, according to a report released today by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

USGS science for a changing world logo
August 2, 2006

Dr. Barry Rosen has been selected to lead U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) science in the state of Florida as the Director of the Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), the agency announced today.

USGS
August 2, 2006

Dr. Barry Rosen has been selected to lead U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) science in the state of Florida as the Director of the Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), the agency announced today. 

USGS
June 1, 2006

As another potentially busy hurricane season approaches, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists are sharing data and photos with the public to stress the importance of evacuation and storm preparedness.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 20, 2005

In a cooperative research program, the USGS, NASA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) are using airborne laser mapping systems to quantify coastal change along the entire coastline affected by Hurricane Katrina (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/hurricanes/katrina/).

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 6, 2005

The USGS is releasing today a 25-minute videotape of footage showing coastal impacts resulting from Hurricane Katrina along the coastline of the northern Gulf of Mexico.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 2, 2005

 

The USGS has posted aerial photos from the northern Gulf of Mexico coastline showing before and after conditions in response to Hurricane Katrina. The photos show five photo pairs of the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, and three photo pairs of Dauphin Island, Alabama. A set of ‘quick response’ photos from Bay St. Louis to Biloxi, Mississippi are also posted.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 2, 2005

"The past several days have seen remarkable devastation resulting from Hurricane Katrina. Our thoughts and prayers are with everyone who has been affected by this disaster," said USGS Acting Director Pat Leahy. "In the aftermath of Katrina, USGS research on hurricanes and natural hazards is no longer just a scientific endeavor – it is a matter of public safety."

USGS
August 29, 2005

Did you know that from your desk you can monitor the effect of Hurricane Katrina as it moves inland? The U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) WaterWatch Web site can show you what’s happening to streams in your local area and show you the places most affected by heavy rains expected from this storm.