Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Nighttime view of tephra-jet explosion, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i...
July 16, 2008

Nighttime view of tephra-jet explosion, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

Incandescent arcs trace the path of lava fragments cast out during a tephra-jet explosion at the Waikupanaha ocean entry in 2008. This is a relatively small explosion, reaching a few tens of meters (yards) height, while one earlier in the day was nearly 70 meters (230 ft) in height. At the bottom of the photograph is the rim of the littoral cone built up by explosion

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Image: Littoral Explosion At Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i
July 16, 2008

Littoral Explosion At Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i

When lava from the Pu'u 'Ō'ō-Kupaianaha eruption, active since 1983, meets the ocean, large littoral explosions can result.

July 10, 2008

Low dome fountain on TEB rootless shield 3

Movie showing the low dome fountain on TEB rootless shield 3; video of spattering from the vent on the west side of Pu`u `Ō `ō crater taken with thermal camera; and video of the vent on the east wall of Pu`u `Ō `ō crater taken with thermal camera.

Gas plume rising from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i...
June 13, 2008

Gas plume rising from Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

Gas plume rising from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano,...
June 5, 2008

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u Crater, Kīlauea Volcano,...
June 2, 2008

Volcanic-gas plume rises from Halema‘uma‘u, Kīlauea

A plume of volcanic gases (chiefly water vapor, carbon dioxide, and sulfur dioxide), tiny lava and rock particles, and droplets drifts southwest in the tradewinds from Halema‘uma‘u Crater. The 500-5,000 metric tons (1.1-11 million pounds) of sulfur dioxide gas emitted each day react in the atmosphere and, with the other gases and particles, form "vog" (volcanic smog)

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May 23, 2008

Flying high over Halema`uma`u, Waikupanaha bench

Flying at about the elevation of the plume top, this video shows a number of aspects of the ongoing activity at Halema`uma`u Crater. The mostly whitish plume rises to an elevation of about 5,500 feet and blows first to the southwest but apparently spreads to the west over the Ka`u Desert. Mauna Loa rises above the clouds in the background. In addition, the ash deposited

May 23, 2008

New gas jet at Pu`u `O`o Crater

Closeup of the new vent from a hovering helicopter showing hazy views of incandescence deep inside the vent.

U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory perched on th...
May 23, 2008

USGS's HVO perched on the rim of Kīlauea's summit caldera, Hawai‘i

U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory perched on the rim of Kīlauea Volcano's summit caldera, Hawai‘i

HVO and Jaggar Museum on Kīlauea Volcano's caldera rim, Hawai‘i...
May 23, 2008

HVO and Jaggar Museum on Kīlauea's caldera rim, Hawai‘i

Close view of the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (right, with viewing tower) and National Park Service Jaggar Museum and overlook (left) on Kīlauea Volcano's caldera rim. At least three fault blocks can be seen below the observatory, which developed when Kīlauea's summit collapsed about 500 years ago to form the present-day caldera.

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boat overturned by a  tsunami , Wailoa River small-boat harbor in Hilo, Hawai`i.
March 27, 2003

About this time every year, we have an article or two on the topic of tsunami. The month of April is observed as "Tsunami Awareness Month" in Hawai`i. It is important that everyone living in Hawai`i learn about tsunami because more people have been killed by tsunami than by any other natural hazard in Hawai`i.

Map shows lava flows erupted during 1983-March 21, 2003
March 21, 2003

Map of flows from Pu`u `O`o: 21 March 2003

Close up view of the eruption column of Mount St. Helens
March 20, 2003

Residents of the Big Island have been living with the nearly continuous eruption of Kīlauea for a bit over 20 years. They have become familiar with its eruptive style-quiet eruptions of lava that cover large areas with black lava flows, often miles away from the source vent--sometimes even reaching the ocean.