Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

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June 1, 2003

Two strands of flowing lava come together

Two strands of flowing lava come together to form single cascade on upper part of old sea cliff at Highcastle. Still taken at 0546 shows same scene.

May 29, 2003

Spreading and advancing breakout

Spreading and advancing breakout, the same as that shown in 0545 still image for today. Width of view, about 2 m.

May 29, 2003

Spreading and advancing breakout

Closer view of spreading and advancing breakout shown above. Width of view, about 0.6 m.

May 29, 2003

Rapidly moving and changing breakout in Highcastle lobe

Rapidly moving and changing breakout in Highcastle lobe. Still taken today at 0603 is of this breakout. Width of view, about 2.5 m.

May 29, 2003

Rapidly moving and changing breakout in Highcastle lobe

Continuation and further development of rapidly moving and changing breakout in Highcastle lobe. Still taken today at 0603 is of this breakout. Width of view, about 2.5 m.

May 23, 2003

Two converging toes

Two converging toes, the same as those shown in last two still images for today. Width of view, about 1.5 m.

April 19, 2003

Lava moving rapidly at front of breakout

Lava moving rapidly at front of breakout 880 m north of coconut grove. Width of view, about 1.5 m.

April 11, 2003

Lava moving along east edge of breakout near ahu

Lava moving along east edge of breakout near ahu. Width of view, about 1 m.

April 11, 2003

Lava at front of breakout

Lava at front of breakout moves into and burns dead shrubbery. Width of view, about 2 m.

March 28, 2003

Lava moves rapidly from under crust

Lava moves rapidly from under crust of inflating flow and finally disappears under overhang. Length of flowing toe, about 1 m.

March 15, 2003

Lava moves across rope

Broad toe of lava moves across rope that formed barrier for access to Wilipe`a lava delta.

March 15, 2003

Lava breaks out of inflated toe

Lava breaks out of inflated toe and moves down moderate slope with rolling motion, top faster than bottom. See still images for this day; sagging rope gives scale.

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USGS
June 11, 1998

Four of us HVO lava junkies had the rare opportunity to witness a partial bench collapse on Monday evening, June 8. The collapse began at 7:40 p.m. when a slab of incandescent lava fell outward from the bench edge into the ocean. The hot rock was fragmented by steam explosions as it hit the sea water, and the steam cloud became abruptly darker as the rock fragments were blasted upward.
 

USGS
June 5, 1998

Lava Continues to Erupt from Pu`u `O`o and Flow Into the Sea

USGS
June 4, 1998

Billowing clouds of steam rising from two discrete locations along the Kamokuna-Waha`ula coastline are often the only reminders we have of Kīlauea Volcano's near-constant effusion of lava into the sea.

USGS
May 28, 1998

The gravitational attraction of the Sun and the Moon produce the familiar ocean tides and the less familiar earth tides. Why are volcanologists interested in earth tides? Earth tides are cyclical, small, and slow ground movements that we use to calibrate and test sensitive volcano deformation- monitoring instruments. They might also trigger volcanic events.
 

USGS
May 21, 1998

Precisely 74 years ago today, the final chapter of one of Kīlauea's most alarming displays of volcanic power came to a close. Halema`uma`u, the fire pit nestled in Kīlauea's summit caldera, ended a 10-day-long outburst of violent steam explosions on May 24, 1924.
 

USGS
May 14, 1998

The story is told of how Maui snared the sun, holding it hostage atop Haleakalā until he slowed its passage across the sky. One result of this slow burn is a barren, rocky landscape devoid of soil or vegetation. Geologically speaking, the devastation resulted as numerous cinder cones and fissures erupted lava that flowed across the crater floor. How young are these flows?

USGS
May 7, 1998

The announcement last week that astronomers at Keck Observatory had looked back 12.3 billion years in time was astounding. When you think about it, though, it is pretty amazing that we can determine the age of any natural event that took place before written records, whether it be 12.3 billion years or a few hundred. How is this done?
 

USGS
April 30, 1998

As April draws to a close, so ends Tsunami Awareness Month in the State of Hawai`i. Tsunami Awareness Month featured programs and events coordinated among a number of government and private-sector organizations in order to increase awareness and understanding of the hazards posed by tsunamis.

USGS
April 23, 1998

The eruption of 1942 was noteworthy for several reasons. (1) It was declared a secret so the press was not allowed to publicize the event. (2) This was the second time lava diversion was tried on an eruption of Mauna Loa. (3) The volcanologists were able to predict the timing and place of the eruption.
 

USGS
April 17, 1998

Surges Interspersed Among Steady-state Activity

USGS
April 16, 1998

Govenor Ben Cayetano's proclamation of April as "Tsunami Awareness Month" in Hawai`i is a timely one, for a generation of residents has grown up oblivious of the destructive force of these waves. 

USGS
April 9, 1998

In some regards, monitoring an active volcano is easy; the constant bustle keeps a watcher on his or her toes. But what if a volcano hasn't erupted in 200 years?