Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

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Geologic map of Mauna Kea with generalized surface distribution of ...

Geologic map of Mauna Kea with generalized surface distribution of ...

Geologic map of Mauna Kea with generalized surface distribution of Hamakua Volcanics. Laupahoehoe Volcanics are inferred to overlie a vast area of Hamakua Volcanics on the upper flanks and summit.

View from m2 cam

[M2cam] The Middle Part of Mauna Loa's Southwest Rift Zone

This image is from a research camera positioned on a cone in Mauna Loa's Southwest Rift Zone in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. The camera looks northeast (upslope), focusing on the middle part of the Southwest Rift Zone. The volcano's summit is at upper right.

Disclaimer

The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully record the dark of

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Wide Angle from HVO Observation Tower

[KW2cam] - Halemaʻumaʻu - Wide Angle

Live Panorama of Halemaʻumaʻu - Wide Angle from HVO Observation Tower [KW2cam].

Geologic map of Mauna Kea, showing generalized distribution of lava...

Geologic map of Mauna Kea, showing generalized distribution of lava...

Geologic map of Mauna Kea, showing generalized distribution of lava flows, cinder cones, and glacial deposits of the Laupahoehoe Volcanics.

View from M3 cam

[M3cam] The Upper Part of Mauna Loa's Southwest Rift Zone

This image is from a research camera positioned on a cone in Mauna Loa's Southwest Rift Zone in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. The camera looks northeast (upslope), focusing on the upper part of the Southwest Rift Zone. The upper flank of Mauna Loa forms the skyline.

Disclaimer

The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully record the dark

...
Panorama of Mauna Ulu

[MUcam] - Mauna Ulu Cam

Live Panorama of Mauna Ulu Cam from [MUcam].

Cleary day view of KI Cam

[KIcam] Kīlauea Caldera from HVO Observation Tower

This image is from a research camera mounted in the observation tower at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. The camera is looking SSE towards the active vent in Halemaʻumaʻu, 1.9 km (1.2 miles) from the webcam. For scale, Halemaʻumaʻu is approximately 1 km (0.6 mi) across and about 85 m (~280 ft) deep.

Disclaimer

The webcams are operational 24

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Changes at Halema`uma`u Over Time

This is a comparison of photos taken from the same location in the Volcano House on May 19 and June 13, 2018. The focal length of the lens for each photo is almost the same. The photos show the enlargement of Halema‘uma‘u laterally and vertically. Note how much lower the rim is relative to the tree in the lower photo.

HVO geologist Matthew Patrick being interviewed on the Kīlauea lava...

Geologist Matthew Patrick being interviewed on the Kīlauea lava-flo...

HVO geologist Matthew Patrick being interviewed on the Kīlauea lava-flow field for a documentary about Hawaiian volcanism. Growing lava delta (left background) steaming at the point of ocean entry.

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USGS
August 17, 2000

Late last week geophysicist Michael Lisowski and his family left Hilo for Vancouver, Washington, and the Cascades Volcano Observatory. 

USGS
August 10, 2000

The weekly newspaper series "Volcano Watch" has been published continuously since November 1991. Its articles keep Big Island residents informed about Kīlauea Volcano's ongoing eruption. 

USGS
August 3, 2000

How much magma enters Kīlauea every day? How much is erupted to the surface? How much stays underground?
 

USGS
July 27, 2000

In our "Volcano Watch" series and in our scientific reports and presentations, we present and discuss findings relating to volcanoes and earthquakes. 

USGS
July 20, 2000

Several million years ago, when Kaua`i was the youngest island in the Hawaiian archipelago, and Pele made her home in the caldera atop Mount Waialeale, a small flock of finches made landfall somewhere in the Hawaiian Islands, exhausted from their trans-Pacific journey. Perhaps they had been blown off-course by a hurricane.
 

USGS
July 13, 2000

We recently completed a leveling survey along the Ka`u trail in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. This 16-km (10 mi) route runs inland from the south coast of the Big Island, crosses the Great Crack, and reaches Highway 11 between Pahala and Kīlauea's summit.

USGS
July 6, 2000

A TV crew doing a documentary on lighthouses in Hawai`i recently asked HVO if erupting Kīlauea and Mauna Loa could have served as natural beacons for Polynesian wayfarers. Stromboli, a constantly active volcano in the Aeolian Islands north of Sicily, has been known for more than 2,000 years as the "lighthouse of the Mediterranean."

USGS
June 29, 2000

In recent weeks the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory has begun a program to install new instrumentation to help monitor Mauna Loa Volcano. These new instruments, called volumetric strainmeters or dilatometers, will measure rock strain below the ground surface.

USGS
June 22, 2000

The Wailuku River is an important landmark to geologists, because it marks the approximate boundary between the lava flows of Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa.

USGS
June 15, 2000

An engineer for a local road-construction contractor recently called the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory to report his company's disturbance of a bench mark. He realized the significance of this incident and properly reported it to the government agency that would be affected.
 

USGS
June 8, 2000

On May 1, 2000, President Clinton announced the United States' decision to stop degrading Global Positioning System (GPS) accuracy. The act has made it possible for civilians to obtain positions as precise as 15 meters (50 ft) using handheld portable GPS receivers. It benefits us in the volcano world, too.
 

USGS
June 1, 2000

Mauna Kea's peaceful appearance is misleading. The volcano is not dead. It erupted many times between 60,000 and 4,000 years ago, and some periods of quiet during that time apparently lasted longer than 4,000 years. Given that record, future eruptions seem almost certain.