Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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HVO geologist Matthew Patrick being interviewed on the Kīlauea lava...

Geologist Matthew Patrick being interviewed on the Kīlauea lava-flo...

HVO geologist Matthew Patrick being interviewed on the Kīlauea lava-flow field for a documentary about Hawaiian volcanism. Growing lava delta (left background) steaming at the point of ocean entry.

Cleary day view of K2 cam

[K2cam] Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook Vent from HVO Observation Tower

This image is from a research camera mounted in the observation tower at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. The camera is looking SSE towards the active vent in Halemaʻumaʻu, 1.9 km (1.2 miles) from the webcam. For scale, the crater wall of Halemaʻumaʻu behind the eruptive vent is about 85 m (~280 ft) high.

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The webcams are

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Image: Minute Gem Snail (Hawaiia minuscula)

Minute Gem Snail (Hawaiia minuscula)

Hawaiia minuscula shell observed with a scanning electron microscope with aperture facing down.

Attribution: Ecosystems
Map of Kīlauea Volcano showing the south-southeast motion, as recor...

Map of Kīlauea showing the south-SE motion, as recorded by continuo...

Map of Kīlauea Volcano showing the south-southeast motion, as recorded by continuous GPS sites (arrows), and earthquake epicenter between February 1-3, 2010.

thumbnail image of Preliminary summary of Kīlauea Volcano’s 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption and summit collapse
September 27, 2018

Preliminary summary of Kīlauea Volcano’s 2018 lower East Rift Zone

Preliminary summary of Kīlauea Volcano’s 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption and summit collapse.

Click on the image above to view the PDF.

HVO scientist conducts an interview at the summit of Kīlauea Volcan...

HVO scientist conducts interview at summit of Kīlauea in 2011

HVO scientist conducts an interview at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano in 2011

View of thermal HT cam

[HTcam] Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook Vent Thermal from Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook

This image is from a temporary thermal camera located on the south rim of Halemaʻumaʻu and looking steeply toward the north at the active Halemaʻumaʻu vent. The temperature scale is in degrees Celsius up to a maximum of 500 degrees (932 degrees Fahrenheit) for this camera model, and scales automatically based on the maximum and minimum temperatures within the frame. Thick

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Image: Minute Gem Snail (Hawaiia minuscula)

Minute Gem Snail (Hawaiia minuscula)

Hawaiia minuscula shell viewed with a scanning electron microscope with aperture facing up.

Attribution: Ecosystems
Changes at Halemaumau over time...
July 31, 2018

Frequently Asked Questions about Deformation at Kīlauea Summit

At present, the summit of Kīlauea Volcano is undergoing dramatic changes. The caldera floor is subsiding. The rim and walls of Halemaʻumaʻu are slumping inward. Nearby residents feel moderate-sized earthquakes, and see small ash plumes rise from the crater. The responses to these Frequently Asked Questions address the reasons behind the current activity at Kīlauea Volcano’

HVO geologist describes activity from Kīlauea Volcano during a fiel...

Geologist describes activity from Kīlauea during a field trip to co...

HVO geologist describes activity from Kīlauea Volcano during a field trip to the coastal lava flow field for members of the media in 2010.

Thermal view of JT cam

[JTcam] Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook Vent Thermal HD at Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook

This image is from a temporary thermal camera. The temperature scale is in degrees Celsius up to a maximum of 500 Celsius (932 Fahrenheit) for this camera model, and scales based on the maximum and minimum temperatures within the frame. Thick fume, image pixel size and other factors often result in image temperatures being lower than actual surface temperatures. 

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USGS
May 25, 2000

"Why should I believe something I can't see, especially since I already don't believe so many things that I can see?" This verbal barb is sometimes used by volcanologists during good-natured, "tongue-fu" exchanges, as when arguing about which discipline—say, geology, seismology, geophysics—is "best" for determining what the volcano has done or might do next.
 

USGS
May 18, 2000

Mosquitoes are not native to the Hawaiian Islands. Anyone driven away from an outdoor activity or rudely awakened by a biting mosquito would agree that the islands of old were indeed a paradise. 

USGS
May 11, 2000

May 18th marks the 20th anniversary of the catastrophic eruption of Mount St. Helens that laid waste to over 540 square km (200 sq mi) of forest, killing 57 people and countless wildlife. Hundreds of kilometers away in eastern Washington, as much as 5 cm (2 in) of ash fell, closing the interstate highway from Seattle to Spokane for a week and paralyzing air traffic.

USGS
May 4, 2000

Kīlauea is a magnet to volcanologists, visitors, and television production companies alike, drawn from around the word by the spell of its eruptions. Kīlauea is also of great interest to those who cannot travel here to see it firsthand. So, it is reasonable that HVO should work with TV crews to bring the Kīlauea story into tens of millions of homes on all continents.
 

USGS
April 27, 2000

Mauna Loa Volcano last erupted 1984. Lava flows from vents in its northeast rift zone reached within seven kilometers (four miles) of Hilo. When and from where will it erupt next?
 

USGS
April 20, 2000

The topics for this article are presented in response to requests from our readers. Many weeks ago, a reader called to express her appreciation for the "Volcano Watch" column and asked if we would write about the Steaming Flats in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.
 

USGS
April 13, 2000

A house burst into flames on Thursday afternoon, April 6, when it was overrun by lava. This house, at the foot of the Royal Gardens subdivision, is the latest of 182 structures to be destroyed by the ongoing eruption along Kīlauea's east rift zone. It's the first such loss since October 1991.
 

USGS
April 6, 2000

On March 31, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park officially opened Kulanaokuaiki campground, a barrier-free facility along the Hilina Pali Road south of Kīlauea's caldera. The new campground replaces the Kipuka Nene picnic area, 2 km (1.2 miles) farther southwest, which is now closed to protect Hawai`i's state bird.

USGS
March 30, 2000

With the east rift zone eruption of Kīlauea continuing into its 18th year, much of our focus in volcano and seismic monitoring at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is on Kīlauea. At the same time, however, Mauna Loa receives a lot of our attention, and it should never be overlooked in terms of the hazards that it poses to us.
 

USGS
March 23, 2000

Which way would you drive if you lived on the on the flank of an active volcano with lava headed your way? This question is based on real-life events that happened during the 1950 eruption of Mauna Loa.
 

USGS
March 16, 2000

The home of over 5 million breeding seabirds, Laysan Island is an uninhabited Hawaiian atoll formed from coral deposits atop a 20 million-year-old submerged volcano. Today the highest point of what was once "Laysan Mountain" is only about 12 meters (40 feet) above sea level, and a person can walk the perimeter in about 3 hours. 

Block ejected from the summit of Mauna Loa volcano less than 1,000 ...
March 15, 2000

An under-appreciated and poorly understood aspect of Mauna Loa's eruptive activity is the presence of explosion debris on the east and west sides of the summit caldera.