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HVO geologist Matthew Patrick being interviewed on the Kīlauea lava...

Geologist Matthew Patrick being interviewed on the Kīlauea lava-flo...

HVO geologist Matthew Patrick being interviewed on the Kīlauea lava-flow field for a documentary about Hawaiian volcanism. Growing lava delta (left background) steaming at the point of ocean entry.

Thermal view of PT cam

[PTcam] Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater Thermal from the North Rim

This image is from a temporary thermal camera positioned on the northwest flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, looking southeast at Puʻu ʻŌʻō's summit crater. The temperature scale is in degrees Celsius up to a maximum of 500 degrees (932 degrees Fahrenheit) for this camera model, and scales automatically based on the maximum and minimum temperatures within the frame. Thick fume, image

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Changes at Halema`uma`u Over Time

This is a comparison of photos taken from the same location in the Volcano House on May 19 and June 13, 2018. The focal length of the lens for each photo is almost the same. The photos show the enlargement of Halema‘uma‘u laterally and vertically. Note how much lower the rim is relative to the tree in the lower photo.

Alaʻili Steaming Activity

[L1cam] - Alaʻili Steaming Activity

Live Panorama of Alaʻili Steaming Activity from Lilewa Crater [L1cam].

HVO scientist conducts an interview at the summit of Kīlauea Volcan...

HVO scientist conducts interview at summit of Kīlauea in 2011

HVO scientist conducts an interview at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano in 2011

Clear day view of PN cam

[PNcam] Puʻu ʻŌʻō North Flank from the North Rim

This image is from a research camera positioned on the northwest flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, looking northeast toward the active flow field.

Disclaimer

The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully record the dark of night if there are no sources of incandescence or other lights. Thermal webcams record heat rather than light and get better views

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Image: Endangered Hawaiian Hoary Bat

Endangered Hawaiian Hoary Bat

An endangered Hawaiian hoary bat, a species that is sometimes killed by wind turbines. USGS scientists from Hawaii and Colorado are devising a way to directly observe bat occurrence and behavior at wind turbines using a video system composed of high-powered illuminators and near-infrared cameras.  This new approach images the full rotor-swept areas of wind turbines for

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Map of Kīlauea Volcano showing the south-southeast motion, as recor...

Map of Kīlauea showing the south-SE motion, as recorded by continuo...

Map of Kīlauea Volcano showing the south-southeast motion, as recorded by continuous GPS sites (arrows), and earthquake epicenter between February 1-3, 2010.

HVO geologist describes activity from Kīlauea Volcano during a fiel...

Geologist describes activity from Kīlauea during a field trip to co...

HVO geologist describes activity from Kīlauea Volcano during a field trip to the coastal lava flow field for members of the media in 2010.

Clear day view of PS Cam

[PScam] Puʻu ʻŌʻō South Flank from the South Rim

This image is from a temporary research camera positioned just south of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, looking north at the southern flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō's cone.

Disclaimer

The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully record the dark of night if there are no sources of incandescence or other lights. Thermal webcams record heat rather than light and get better

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Filter Total Items: 1,893
USGS
April 10, 1997

The 55th episode of Kīlauea's east rift zone eruption has resumed with the vigor that characterized the eruption prior to January 30. We mark the episode's onset as 0700 hrs on February 24, the time when lava first reappeared in the crater of Pu`u `O`o following a 23-day pause. 

USGS
April 8, 1997

The term "geologic hazards" in Hawaii generally means volcanic eruptions and lava flows. A hazard that might not come to mind is the possibility of earthquakes, as large as magnitude-eight, under the flanks of the active volcanoes, according to Fred Klein, a seismologist with the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, Calif.

USGS
April 4, 1997

USGS field crews report that the lava pond inside the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater is at a depth of 190 feet below the rim, and is essentially unchanged since last Friday.

USGS
April 3, 1997

Observations of the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō–Kupaianaha eruption relayed from helicopter tour pilots at 0800 hrs and 1030 hrs indicate that lava is flowing from two breakouts in the tube system near the 2300-ft. elevation, approximately 1 mile from the vent area.

USGS
April 3, 1997

I answered the phone last week to a perplexed voice asking, "The paper says Pu`u `O`o is erupting but there aren't any lava flows. How can it be erupting, then?" I explained that lava is ponded deep in the crater of Pu`u `O`o but is not overflowing the rim. 

USGS
April 1, 1997

Field observations of the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō–Kupaianaha eruption today show that lava has re-entered the old tube system near Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō.

USGS
March 31, 1997

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, at Kīlauea Volcano, has been erupting almost continuously since January 3, 1983. However, this is the first time since January 31 of this year that lava has been observed anywhere except within the crater of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō.

USGS
March 27, 1997

What will the next eruption of Hualālai be like? The first step in answering that question is to find out what the last several eruptions were like. That doesn't sound so hard - we should be able to look in some book or on the Worldwide Web. After all, Kīlauea and Mauna Loa erupted a bunch of times in the last couple of centuries and there is plenty of information on those eruptions available.

USGS
March 20, 1997

Dr. Thomas L . Wright, HVO's Scientist-in-Charge from 1984 to 1991, returned to the Big Island for a short visit last week to conduct studies of the fault systems cutting Kīlauea's south flank. As a scientist, Wright is best known for his pivotal research on the geochemistry of Hawaiian lava.
 

USGS
March 13, 1997

If you've ever watched videos of the current eruption, you've seen geologists throwing hammer-headed cables into the lava tube to snag a glob of lava, or running to catch molten spatter from lava fountains. Lava sampling can be risky, so why do we bother to do it?

USGS
March 6, 1997

Sinners or not, many of us living on the island of Hawai`i over the past decade feel that, although we cherish the volcanoes, the smell of sulfur gas and volcanic air pollution, or vog, from Kīlauea has become decidedly unpleasant.
 

USGS
February 28, 1997

The Island of Hawai`i is the fastest-growing region in the State of Hawai`i, with over 100,000 residents and a population that continues to grow at a rate of 3% per annum. The Governor has referred to the Big Island as the crown jewel of the State.