Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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June 26, 2003

Lava cascade

Same cascade as in first clip, but viewed more from side to see lava falling down cliff and spreading across surface of lava delta. Similar view to still image taken at 0548 today.

June 26, 2003

Surging cascade on steep cliff face

Surging cascade on steep cliff face. Note that surges override part of cascade next to cliff, which is slowed by friction with the cliff.

June 26, 2003

Lava issues from breached tube

Lava issues from breached tube and quickly disappears over old sea cliff. Note that center of stream stands above margins. See still taken at 0545 today.

June 21, 2003

Lava in channeled breakout

Lava in channeled breakout from nearby tumulus flowing rapidly down steep slope before spreading out on flat ground. Same channel as shown in last two stills for today. Width of channel, about 2 m.

June 7, 2003

Gushing start of lava cascade

Gushing start of cascade shown in image taken at 0553. Lava comes from crusted flow to right. Width of flowing lava, about 1 m.

June 7, 2003

Lava flow

Downstream from first clip about 2 m. Same as shown in image taken at 0554.

June 1, 2003

Two strands of flowing lava come together

Two strands of flowing lava come together to form single cascade on upper part of old sea cliff at Highcastle. Still taken at 0546 shows same scene.

May 29, 2003

Spreading and advancing breakout

Spreading and advancing breakout, the same as that shown in 0545 still image for today. Width of view, about 2 m.

May 29, 2003

Spreading and advancing breakout

Closer view of spreading and advancing breakout shown above. Width of view, about 0.6 m.

May 29, 2003

Rapidly moving and changing breakout in Highcastle lobe

Rapidly moving and changing breakout in Highcastle lobe. Still taken today at 0603 is of this breakout. Width of view, about 2.5 m.

May 29, 2003

Rapidly moving and changing breakout in Highcastle lobe

Continuation and further development of rapidly moving and changing breakout in Highcastle lobe. Still taken today at 0603 is of this breakout. Width of view, about 2.5 m.

May 23, 2003

Two converging toes

Two converging toes, the same as those shown in last two still images for today. Width of view, about 1.5 m.

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USGS
July 15, 1999

The islands of the Pacific are some of the most isolated in the world and have produced distinct floras and faunas. Endemism, whereby plants and animals are restricted to a single geographic area, is frequent. Hawai`i exemplifies this process.

USGS
July 9, 1999

A highly endangered native Hawaiian bird species has taken a small but significant step back from the brink of extinction. USGS biologists monitoring 14 captive-reared puaiohi released into the wild earlier this year by The Peregrine Fund say the birds are nesting and have already fledged four young.

USGS
July 8, 1999

Visitors to the Big Island's southeast coast commonly see a steam plume, the telltale sign that Kīlauea's eruption is sending lava into the ocean.

USGS
July 1, 1999

Many readers know that the island of Hawai`i is made of five volcanoes—Kīlauea, Mauna Loa, Hualālai, Mauna Kea, and Kohala. 

USGS
June 24, 1999

Each summer, staff members of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory have participated in student training programs with the University of Hawaii at Hilo (UHH). One of the programs on which HVO scientists have helped is the Rocks and Rolls volcanology session of Na Pua No`eau.

USGS
June 17, 1999

Two magnitude-4.4 earthquakes rocked the Big Island this month. The first occurred on June 3 and was located 13 km (7.8 mi) east of Waimea at a depth of 38.3 km (23 mi). The second was a week later on June 10 and was located 21.3 km (12.8 mi) southeast of Punalu`u at a depth of 52 km (31.2 mi).
 

USGS
June 10, 1999

If you ask volcanologists what the most dangerous part of their job is, they are likely to answer, "flying in helicopters."

USGS
June 3, 1999

Over the years HVO has attempted to maintain its scientific energy, enthusiasm, and insights by melding a permanent staff with a smaller cadre of rotating, research-oriented scientists. The observatory has about one rotating researcher for every four or five permanent staff. Rotating scientists generally stay 3-5 years.

USGS
May 27, 1999

Lava flows are one of the most common hazards produced by active volcanoes. Here in Hawai`i, they may endanger property but seldom endanger people's lives. 

USGS
May 20, 1999

"Wekiu" is the Hawaiian word for top or summit. This name was given to Mauna Kea's tallest cinder cone, which reaches 13,796 feet in elevation and is the highest in the Hawaiian archipelago. Life on the Mauna Kea summit must endure freezing temperatures, winter snow falls, and, occasionally, hurricane-force winds. 

USGS
May 18, 1999

A small population of the endangered Hawaiian bird, palila, is holding steady on the western slopes of Mauna Kea volcano.

USGS
May 13, 1999

May 18 marks the anniversary of the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, which laid waste to over 520 square kilometers (200 square miles) of forest and killed 57 people.