Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

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August 10, 2002

Lava falling over sea cliff

Lava falling over sea cliff into water at western group of entries.

August 9, 2002

Lava falls into sea from western two entries at Highcastle

Lava falls into sea from western two entries at Highcastle. Entry started within past several hours. Listen to the "plop, plop" sounds as lava drips hit water.

August 9, 2002

Lava dropping into the sea

Telephoto of lava dropping into the sea.

July 21, 2002

Lava spilling over the lip of Wilipe`a sea cliff

Close view of lava spilling over the lip of Wilipe`a sea cliff.

July 21, 2002

Wave crashing over lava

Close view of wave crashing over lava in the surf zone.

July 21, 2002

Lava spills over Wilipe`a sea cliff

Lava spills over Wilipe`a sea cliff and across boulders into the sea.

July 19, 2002

Lava cascades down sea cliff

Lava cascades down sea cliff on July 19, 2002, 3.5 hours after Mother's Day flow reached to the sea.

February 23, 2002

A`a lava flow on 23 February

 

A`a lava flow on 23 February

    Lava bubble burst explosion on active lava delta, Kīlauea Volcano, ...
    March 9, 1994

    Lava bubble burst explosion on active lava delta, Kīlauea, Hawai‘i

    Two bubble bursts explode simultaneously as a consequence seawater mixing with lava in a lava tube beneath surface of a lava delta. Because of the confined conditions in the lava tube, explosive pressures build up as water, heated by contact with molten lava, expands instantly to steam. The explosive energy of the steam is sufficient to blast a hole through the top of the

    ...
    Black and white graphic showing gray shaded areas for the areas of lava flows.
    November 8, 1991

    Map showing the location of lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō

    Map shows the location of lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō (unshaded), and Kūpaianaha (dark shaded), and Friday's fissure eruption (light shading) on Kīlauea's East Rift Zone. The inset shows the area of the enlarged flow field map and the locations and magnitudes of all felt earthquakes for the past week.

    Black and white graphic showing gray shaded areas for the areas of lava flows.
    November 3, 1991

    Map showing the location of lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō

    Map showing the location of lava flows from Puʻu ʻŌʻō (unshaded) and Kūpaianaha (shaded) on Kīlauea's East Rift Zone. The inset shows the area of the enlarged flow field map and the locations and magnitudes of felt earthquakes for the past week.

    Image: Cinder Cones on Mauna Kea
    February 16, 1991

    Cinder Cones on Mauna Kea

    Cinder cones at the summit of Mauna Kea. Mauna Kea is a dormant shield volcano on the north end of Hawaii Island. Astronomical observatories in the foreground.

    Cinder cones (otherwise known as scoria cones) are the most common type of volcano on Earth. They’re also one of the smallest. They can often be found growing on larger volcanoes, in which case they’re dubbed

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    USGS
    December 24, 1998

    When you visit the coast to watch lava pour into the sea, do you ever wonder where the lava came from and what path it took to the surface? We earth scientists do.

    USGS
    December 17, 1998

    Last week, four members of the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory attended the annual fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in San Francisco. AGU has a membership of more than 35,000 scientists from 115 countries, and 8,275 of the members attended this meeting.

    USGS
    December 11, 1998

    At a recent public meeting, the State of Hawai`i outlined a proposal to locate a new, approximately 2,300-bed medium-security correctional facility 10 km (6 mi) downslope from the existing, approximately 100-bed minimum-security correctional facility.

    USGS
    December 3, 1998

    Scientists have learned a lot about the on-land part of Kīlauea's east rift zone, but little is known about its underwater part, the Puna Ridge. A research cruise late in September and October was the first to explore the ridge in detail.
     

    USGS
    November 26, 1998

    Hawai`i is one of the most extensively studied volcanic regions in the world. However, there is still very little known about the processes that take place deep underneath a volcano in what geologists casually call the "plumbing system." 

    USGS
    November 19, 1998

    One of the most useful gadgets in the geologist's tool box is the ability to measure the age of a lava flow, an island, or even the earth itself.
     

    USGS
    November 12, 1998

    Lava and the surf—two powerful forces seeking supremacy over each other. One consequence of this battle is "floating rocks" seen near the ocean entry, where lava from Kīlauea's ongoing eruption reaches the south shore of the Big Island.
     

    USGS
    November 5, 1998

    The terrible tragedy in Nicaragua and Honduras from Hurricane Mitch's extraordinary rainfall was made worse by a volcano. The volcano didn't erupt, and it isn't even listed separately among the 1,511 volcanoes known to have been active in the past 10,000 years. 

    USGS
    October 29, 1998

    Every day, tourists and locals visit Kolekole stream to see 70 cubic meters of water per second (18,000 gallons per minute or gpm) cascade 135 m (442 feet) over Akaka Falls to the plunge pool below. The sight can be both dramatic and serene.
     

    USGS
    October 25, 1998

    Early Sunday morning shoppers at the Volcano farmers market can purchase delicious greenhouse tomatoes grown in Mountain View. In a cool mauka (inland) environment, the greenhouse provides the essential warmth that tomatoes require.
     

    USGS
    October 15, 1998

    The major part of each Hawaiian volcano lies below sea level, which creates a logistical nightmare: How does one study the submarine slopes?

    USGS
    October 8, 1998

    Scientists know more about the history and inner dynamics of Kīlauea than they do about most other volcanoes in the world. Yet a major portion of the volcano has received little attention.