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A fast-moving ‘s‘ā flow erupted from Mauna Loa in 1950 as it advanc...
June 2, 1950

A fast-moving ‘A‘ā flow erupted from Mauna Loa in 1950 as it advanc...

Aerial photograph shows the Ka‘apuna lava flow erupted from Mauna Loa in 1950 as it advanced through the forest at about 3,000 feet elevation on the morning of June 2. This rapidly moving ‘a‘ā lava flow traveled from the Southwest Rift Zone vent to the ocean in about 17 hours. Earlier flows from this same eruption reached the ocean in as little as three hours.

Aerial photograph of the 1942 Mauna Loa lava flow spreading downslo...
April 28, 1942

Aerial photograph of the 1942 Mauna Loa lava flow spreading downslo...

Aerial photograph of the 1942 Mauna Loa lava flow spreading downslope toward Hilo; smoke from burning trees in center of flow. Scattered cinder cones at the summit of Mauna Kea, top of photograph.

Aerial view by the Naval Air Service of the 1933 Mauna Loa eruption...
November 22, 1935

Aerial view by the Naval Air Service of the 1933 Mauna Loa eruption...

Aerial view by the Naval Air Service of the 1933 Mauna Loa eruption from a fissure across the rim and floor of Moku‘āweoweo Crater.

video thumbnail: Mauna Loa Volcano Hawaii -- 1930s Eruption (Part 1 of 5)
December 31, 1929

Mauna Loa Volcano Hawaii -- 1930s Eruption (Part 1 of 5)

Part 1 of 5

Remarkable silent film, 16mm Kodachrome movie film. Probably the first color film ever made of a volcanic eruption. Mokuaweoweo Crater eruption filmed probably in late 1935 by Harold T. Stearns, a USGS Hydrologist-Volcanologist. The lava fountains are hundreds of feet high, the erupting fissure inside the crater is about two thousand feet long. The

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video thumbnail: Mauna Loa Volcano Hawaii -- 1930s Eruption (Part 2 of 5)
December 31, 1929

Mauna Loa Volcano Hawaii -- 1930s Eruption (Part 2 of 5)

Part 2 of 5

Remarkable silent film, 16mm Kodachrome movie film. Probably the first color film ever made of a volcanic eruption. Mokuaweoweo Crater eruption filmed probably in late 1935 by Harold T. Stearns, a USGS Hydrologist-Volcanologist. The lava fountains are hundreds of feet high, the erupting fissure inside the crater is about two thousand feet long. The

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video thumbnail: Mauna Loa Volcano Hawaii -- 1930s Eruption (Part 3 of 5)
December 31, 1929

Mauna Loa Volcano Hawaii -- 1930s Eruption (Part 3 of 5)

Part 3 of 5

Remarkable silent film, 16mm Kodachrome movie film. Probably the first color film ever made of a volcanic eruption. Mokuaweoweo Crater eruption filmed probably in late 1935 by Harold T. Stearns, a USGS Hydrologist-Volcanologist. The lava fountains are hundreds of feet high, the erupting fissure inside the crater is about two thousand feet long. The

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video thumbnail: Mauna Loa Volcano Hawaii -- 1930s Eruption (Part 4 of 5)
December 31, 1929

Mauna Loa Volcano Hawaii -- 1930s Eruption (Part 4 of 5)

Part 4 of 5

Remarkable silent film, 16mm Kodachrome movie film. Probably the first color film ever made of a volcanic eruption. Mokuaweoweo Crater eruption filmed probably in late 1935 by Harold T. Stearns, a USGS Hydrologist-Volcanologist. The lava fountains are hundreds of feet high, the erupting fissure inside the crater is about two thousand feet long. The

...
video thumbnail: Mauna Loa Volcano Hawaii -- 1930s Eruption (Part 5 of 5)
December 31, 1929

Mauna Loa Volcano Hawaii -- 1930s Eruption (Part 5 of 5)

Part 5 of 5

Remarkable silent film, 16mm Kodachrome movie film. Probably the first color film ever made of a volcanic eruption. Mokuaweoweo Crater eruption filmed probably in late 1935 by Harold T. Stearns, a USGS Hydrologist-Volcanologist. The lava fountains are hundreds of feet high, the erupting fissure inside the crater is about two thousand feet long. The

...
Ejected tephra from Halemaumau at Kīlauea Volcano, May 31, 1924...
May 31, 1924

Ejected tephra from Halemaumau at Kīlauea, May 31, 1925

This scene west of Halemaumau looks toward the rim of the caldera, southwest of Uēkahuna Bluff. New ballistic blocks and ash from the 1924 eruption coat the floor of the caldera.

Airplane landing field at Kīlauea Volcano strewn with blocks from s...
May 22, 1924

Airplane landing field at Kīlauea strewn with blocks from several e...

Prior to the eruption of 1924, this area was swept clean and used as a landing field for airplanes. This view looking toward the north rim of Halemaumau shows the air field littered with ballistic blocks from explosions in the 1924 eruption.

Explosion from Halemaumau at Kīlauea Volcano as viewed from Uēkahun...
May 18, 1924

Explosion from Halemaumau at Kīlauea May 18, 1924.

This was probably the strongest explosion of the eruption. Rocks and debris fell among spectators southeast of Halemaumau, causing one fatality. A torrential downpour and an electrical storm followed.

Spectators flee explosion from Halemaumau at Kīlauea Volcano, 1114 ...
May 18, 1924

Spectators flee explosion from Halemaumau at Kīlauea, May 18, 1925

Acting HVO director Ruy Finch snapped this photograph of spectators running away as large blocks were tossed about 600 meters (2000 feet) onto an airplane landing field. Lorrin A. Thurston provided this description: "About three minutes later with a sudden dull roar a column of inky black eruption cloud shot upward from the pit and great masses of gray ash rolled out from

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USGS
August 15, 1997

One of the most highly watched events recently on television occurred on the Fourth of July when the U.S. Mars Pathfinder mission successfully transmitted images from the red planet back to Earth. The panorama of the Martian landing site had a striking semblance to the boulder-strewn field south of Halema`uma`u crater. 

USGS
August 14, 1997

An earthquake shook the entire Island of Hawai‘i at about 3:54 p.m. this afternoon.

USGS
August 8, 1997

Pele continued her march to the sea in the two months since our last eruption update through Volcano Watch. Lava reached the ocean on July 12 and occasionally since then. Also, lava flows were emplaced north and west of Royal Gardens but are not presently threatening any residential areas.
 

USGS
August 1, 1997

The English missionary, Rev. William Ellis, visited the summit region of Kīlauea 174 years ago this week and made the first written description of eruptive activity at the volcano. His foot party departed Kailua on July 18, 1823, eventually reaching Kapapala on July 30.

USGS
July 25, 1997

The North Kona Coast of the Big Island is fortunate to have several Hawaiian fishponds preserved. These ponds were major construction feats by which Hawaiians cultivated fish.

USGS
July 18, 1997

Last Friday, July 18, marked the two-year anniversary of the ongoing eruption of Soufriere Hills volcano on the small Caribbean island of Montserrat. The sulfurous gases, drifting ash clouds, and avalanches of hot rock that periodically burgeon from the volcano have inflicted social and economic hardships that have become increasingly difficult for islanders to bear.

USGS
July 11, 1997

Following the June 30th M5.3 Kalapana earthquake, there seemed to be a misunderstanding of what the magnitude of an earthquake really means.
 

USGS
July 10, 1997

A lava flow is nearing the extreme southwest end of Royal Gardens subdivision on the south flank of Kīlauea. 

USGS
July 4, 1997

The earthquake that woke many Big Island residents at 5:47 a.m. on Monday, June 30, was the biggest on the island since February 1, 1994, and the largest on Kīlauea's south flank since 1989. Its magnitude (M) was about 5.3 (the exact value is still being refined), big enough to cause extensive non-structural damage in the South Hilo and Puna districts.

USGS
June 30, 1997

An earthquake shook the entire Island of Hawai‘i at about 0547 this morning. 

USGS
June 27, 1997

Sometimes people call the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) and ask us if more gas is coming out of the volcano because air quality where they are calling from seems worse, or maybe because the amount of visible fume at Pu`u `O`o or Halema`uma`u seems greater.