Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 1,633
Fissures in Leilani Estates

[PGcam] - Fissures in Leilani Estates

Live Panorama of Fissures in Leilani Estates from Puʻu Honuaula [PGcam].

Thermal view of PT cam

[PTcam] Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater Thermal from the North Rim

This image is from a temporary thermal camera positioned on the northwest flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, looking southeast at Puʻu ʻŌʻō's summit crater. The temperature scale is in degrees Celsius up to a maximum of 500 degrees (932 degrees Fahrenheit) for this camera model, and scales automatically based on the maximum and minimum temperatures within the frame. Thick fume, image

...
HVO geologist Matthew Patrick being interviewed on the Kīlauea lava...

Geologist Matthew Patrick being interviewed on the Kīlauea lava-flo...

HVO geologist Matthew Patrick being interviewed on the Kīlauea lava-flow field for a documentary about Hawaiian volcanism. Growing lava delta (left background) steaming at the point of ocean entry.

Changes at Halema`uma`u Over Time

This is a comparison of photos taken from the same location in the Volcano House on May 19 and June 13, 2018. The focal length of the lens for each photo is almost the same. The photos show the enlargement of Halema‘uma‘u laterally and vertically. Note how much lower the rim is relative to the tree in the lower photo.

Alaʻili Steaming Activity

[L1cam] - Alaʻili Steaming Activity

Live Panorama of Alaʻili Steaming Activity from Lilewa Crater [L1cam].

Clear day view of PN cam

[PNcam] Puʻu ʻŌʻō North Flank from the North Rim

This image is from a research camera positioned on the northwest flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, looking northeast toward the active flow field.

Disclaimer

The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully record the dark of night if there are no sources of incandescence or other lights. Thermal webcams record heat rather than light and get better views

...
Image: Endangered Hawaiian Hoary Bat

Endangered Hawaiian Hoary Bat

An endangered Hawaiian hoary bat, a species that is sometimes killed by wind turbines. USGS scientists from Hawaii and Colorado are devising a way to directly observe bat occurrence and behavior at wind turbines using a video system composed of high-powered illuminators and near-infrared cameras.  This new approach images the full rotor-swept areas of wind turbines for

...
Map of Kīlauea Volcano showing the south-southeast motion, as recor...

Map of Kīlauea showing the south-SE motion, as recorded by continuo...

Map of Kīlauea Volcano showing the south-southeast motion, as recorded by continuous GPS sites (arrows), and earthquake epicenter between February 1-3, 2010.

HVO scientist conducts an interview at the summit of Kīlauea Volcan...

HVO scientist conducts interview at summit of Kīlauea in 2011

HVO scientist conducts an interview at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano in 2011

Clear day view of PS Cam

[PScam] Puʻu ʻŌʻō South Flank from the South Rim

This image is from a temporary research camera positioned just south of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, looking north at the southern flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō's cone.

Disclaimer

The webcams are operational 24/7 and faithfully record the dark of night if there are no sources of incandescence or other lights. Thermal webcams record heat rather than light and get better

...
Filter Total Items: 1,930
USGS
October 24, 1997

Recently, fall "vog season" returned to east Hawai`i, ushered in with phone calls to the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). Residents from Hamakua to Volcano have called us with concerns about what has been some of the worst regional air quality of the year.
 

USGS
October 21, 1997

Pu`u `O`o lava overflows the cone repeatedly

USGS
October 17, 1997

A volcano is a complex system. During periods of sustained eruption, such as the present time, Kīlauea Volcano undergoes little internal change.

USGS
October 10, 1997

The eruption of Kīlauea Volcano has settled into a stable vent site, extrusive rate, and route to the sea. This statement would have been unimaginable in the early days of episode 55.
 

USGS
October 2, 1997

Lava flows are the biggest volcanic hazard in east Puna. In the past two centuries, four eruptions from Kīlauea's east rift zone have produced widespread lava flows: in 1790 (more than 45 km2 [16 mi2]), 1840 (22 km2 [7.9 mi2]), 1955 (17 km2 [6.1 mi2]), and 1960 (11.5 km2 [4.1 mi2]).

USGS
September 19, 1997

The Director of the U.S. Geological Survey, Gordon Eaton, announced his retirement last week at the agency's National Center in Reston, VA. Dr. Eaton was appointed to the post by President Clinton in 1994. When he retires on October 1 of this year, Dr. Eaton will have completed over 17 years of public service under the USGS banner.
 

Lava entering sea...
September 12, 1997

The billowing steam plumes rising from where lava enters the ocean are an indication that Kīlauea's eruption may be returning to normal, after several months of unsettled behavior. 

USGS
September 5, 1997

"A curtain of fire extended far down the rift zone. Fire fountains played to great heights. Burning embers fell to the ground. Smoke drifted downwind from the fountains of fire. Rivers of fire flowed downslope."
 

USGS
August 29, 1997

For over a decade, we have watched lava flows from Kīlauea overrun nearly 40 square miles of land, destroying precious forests, communities, and sacred ground. At other times, major earthquakes have generated damage over considerable parts of the island of Hawaii and, in the cases of the 1871 and 1938 earthquakes, even other islands.

USGS
August 22, 1997

Rift zones, which form during the shield-building stage of development, are prominent features of Hawaiian volcanoes. They are typically long, linear features whose formation and orientation are influenced by gravity and the pressures imparted by adjacent volcanoes. Most Hawaiian volcanoes have at least two major rift zones. These rift zones extend all the way down to the ocean floor.