Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 367
Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 6, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 12:30 pm on Wednesday, June 6.

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 6, 2018

Map as of 12:00 p.m. (noon) HST, June 6, 2018.

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 5, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 12:30 pm on Tuesday, June 5

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 5, 2018

Map as of 10:00 a.m. HST, June 5, 2018.

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 4, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 12:30 pm on Monday, June 4

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 4, 2018

Map as of 2:00 p.m. HST, June 4, 2018.

June 3 Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 3, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 12:30 pm on Sunday, June 3.

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 3, 2018

Map as of 11:00 a.m. HST, June 3, 2018.

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 2, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6:45 am on Saturday, June 2.

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 2, 2018

Map as of 1:30 p.m. HST, June 2, 2018.

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 1, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 5:30 pm on Friday, June 1.

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 1, 2018

Map as of 6:00 p.m. HST, June 1, 2018.

Filter Total Items: 2,120
A zoomed in view of the active lava lake and western vent, taken from the west rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea summit
April 7, 2021

Active lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater on April 7, 2021

A zoomed in view of the active lava lake and western vent, taken from the west rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea summit. The active lava lake remains perched a few meters (yards) higher than the surrounding solidified lava crust. A few small rafted islands (darker in color) are visible within the active western lava lake. The bluish-white gas plume marks the location

...
Color photograph of lava lake
April 5, 2021

April 5, 2021 — Kīlauea

The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active, as seen in this view looking north. Active surface lava is limited to the western (left) portion of the lake between the main island and the western fissure complex. The blueish tinge to the plume from the western fissure complex (left) is due to sulfur dioxide (SO2). USGS photo

...
Color map of lava lake at volcano summit
April 5, 2021

April 5, 2021—Kīlauea summit eruption contour map

This map of Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea shows 20 m (66 ft) contour lines (dark gray) that mark locations of equal elevation above sea level (asl). The map shows that the lava lake has filled 225 m (738 ft) of the crater, to an elevation of 742 m (2434 ft) asl since the eruption began on December 20, 2020. Contour lines highlighted in green, purple, and blue mark

...
Color photograph of volcanic vent
April 2, 2021

Vent in Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea's summit - April 2, 2021

Telephoto image of the western cone complex of the current eruption in Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea's summit. In the center, a horseshoe-shaped spatter rampart is partially filled in by a more recent spatter cone. The cone has an incandescent opening that spatter is occasionally erupted from. Behind the main cone (to the right in the image) is another spatter cone, darker in

...
Color photograph of lava lake
April 2, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption — April 2, 2021

A wide view of the eruption within Halema‘uma‘u crater at the summit of Kīlauea. The western vent and perched lava lake remain active in the western portion of the crater (left). Sulfur dioxide emission rates remain elevated, with the most recent measurement being 1,200 tonnes per day on April 1. USGS photo taken by L. DeSmither on April 2, 2021.

Color photograph of lava flow
April 2, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption — April 2, 2021

A telephoto view of the eastern Halema‘uma‘u crater wall and portion of the crusted-over lava lake at Kīlauea summit. In this photo, molten lava from below the surface crust has squeezed up between the lava crust and the crater wall as an “ooze-out.” USGS photo taken by L. DeSmither on April 2, 2021.

Color photograph of lava lake
April 2, 2021

Kīlauea summit eruption — April 2, 2021

A telephoto image from the ongoing eruption within Halema‘uma‘u crater at the summit of Kīlauea. Lava continues to enter the lava lake through an inlet near the base of the west vent cone (right). An incandescent opening near the top of the cone (upper center), ejected occasional bursts of spatter. Crustal foundering of a section of the lava lake surface crust (lower

...
Color photograph of volcanic vent
April 1, 2021

March 31, 2021 - Photo of Halema‘uma‘u western fissure

This March 31, 2021, photo shows a close-up view of the active western fissure of Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea volcano on the Island of Hawai‘i. Near the bottom of the photo, orange incandescence can be seen from two circular vents of the spatter cones. The orange area above the vents is where lava is entering the lava lake, and the orange area in upper right side of the photo

...
March 30, 2021

Kīlauea Volcano — Halema‘uma‘u Lava Lake Inlet (March 30, 2021)

The lava lake remains active in Halema‘uma‘u Crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. This video shows the inlet where lava from the western fissure is supplied to the lake. The motion of the lava stream is sluggish, and this video is shown at 20x speed.
 

Color map of lava lake at volcano summit
March 29, 2021

March 29, 2021—Kīlauea summit eruption contour map showing lava lake

This map of Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea shows 20 m (66 ft) contour lines (dark gray) that mark locations of equal elevation above sea level (asl). The map shows that the lava lake has filled 224 m (735 ft) of the crater, to an elevation of 741 m (2431 ft) asl since the eruption began on December 20, 2020. Contour lines highlighted in green, purple, and blue mark

...
Color photograph of lava lake
March 29, 2021

March 27, 2021 — Kīlauea

A close up of the inlet where lava from the western fissure feeds into the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea. The lava stream was sluggish, with the movement barely perceptible with the naked eye. USGS photo by M. Patrick.

Color photograph of lava lake
March 29, 2021

March 27, 2021 — Kīlauea

The lava lake remains active in Halema‘uma‘u Crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. The surface area of the active lava lake has slowly decreased over the past several months, with the active surface lava now limited to a portion of the west side of lake. The lake remains perched several meters (yards) above its surroundings, bound by a steep levee on most sides. USGS photo by

...
Filter Total Items: 2,298
Color photograph of lava lake
February 24, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

February 22, 2021 — Kīlauea
February 23, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

HVO geologists use a laser rangefinder to measure the distance to the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake
February 22, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

On the February 16 helicopter overflight, thermal imagery of the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake was collected
February 19, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

USGS science for a changing world
February 18, 2021

The USGS recently published "Unoccupied Aircraft Systems (UAS) video of the 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii." The Data Release contains UAS footage from the 2018 eruption of Kīlauea Volcano’s lower East Rift Zone, on the Island of Hawai‘i. A subset of the videos collected were used for monitoring the fissure 8 lava channel and for measuring flow velocities.

USGS science for a changing world
February 18, 2021

A new chapter of USGS Professional Paper 1867, "The 2008–2018 Summit Lava Lake at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i" was recently published online. The 2008–2018 lava lake at the summit of Kīlauea marked the longest sustained period of lava lake activity at the summit in decades and provided a new opportunity for observing and understanding lava lake behavior.

Unoccupied Aircraft Systems (UAS) photo from Tuesday, Feb. 9, shows the stagnant, crusted-over eastern portion of the lava lake
February 18, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

This thermal image taken during the February 1 helicopter overflight shows the features of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u
February 18, 2021

Kīlauea’s current lava lake formed on December 20th and rose rapidly within Halema‘uma‘u crater during the dynamic first week of the ongoing summit eruption. Near the end of December, the eruption stabilized and the lava lake has been slowly changing since then.

Overflight photo of erupting western fissure in Halema‘uma‘u, February 16, 2021
February 17, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

This telephoto image of the western vent was taken from the west rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater, at Kīlauea summit.
February 16, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Color photograph of lava
February 12, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Portrait of a man wearing glasses and a blue shirt
February 11, 2021

The next USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) Scientist-in-Charge (SIC) has been named, and it’s a name that Island of Hawai‘i residents may be familiar with—Dr. Ken Hon! Ken will be the 21rst Scientist-in-Charge filling a position originally created by Thomas A. Jaggar, who founded HVO in 1912 and directed it until 1940.