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Image: Vog from Kilauea
January 31, 2008

Vog from Kilauea

The rim of Kīlauea Volcano’s summit caldera, normally clear on trade-wind days (left), became nearly obscured by vog (right) on some non-trade wind days beginning in 2008, when sulfur dioxide emissions from the volcano’s summit increased to unusually high levels. (This photo has been edited.)

January 26, 2008

TEB rootless shield flank failure

(January 26, 2008, 10:50:12 to 19:12:16) Perched lava ponds often formed atop the rootless shields built by the "Thanksgiving Eve Breakout" (TEB) lava flow. This movie shows the failure of the flank of a rootless shield on January 26, 2008, and the release of the lava contained within the perched lava pond at its summit. The inner wall of the perched lava pond come into

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Image: Hawaiian Sunset
December 1, 2007

Hawaiian Sunset

Sunset over the ocean near Poipu, Kauai, Hawaii.

December 1, 2007

TEB effusion and partial rootless shield flank failure

(December 1, 2007, 02:01:38 to 16:01:36) On November 21, 2007—the eve of the U.S. Thanksgiving holiday—Episode 58 changed dramatically. Lava, erupting from Fissure D into a perched lava channel, found an easier path to the surface and broke out from directly over Fissure D on what was, by then, the southern flank of the channel. This switch in the eruption led to the

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November 15, 2007

Episodic spattering in the Episode 58 lava channel

(November 15, 2007, 09:00:15 to 13:00:15) Periods of overflow and levee construction at the Episode 58 lava channel were interspersed with periods when the lava level was below the channel rim. The lava surface within the lava channel commonly experienced repeated cycles of rise and fall, as shown here. During these cycles, the lava surface would rise slowly, then

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September 20, 2007

Dome fountain over Fissure D vent of the Episode 58 eruption

(September 20, 2007, 05:00:03 to 09:00:03) As the Episode 58 lava channel developed, the upper end of the channel crusted over so that lava—extruding from the erupting fissure—flowed through a short tube before entering the channel. A small surge of lava on September 20, 2007, exceeded the carrying capacity of this tube and resulted in a small dome fountain through the

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September 8, 2007

Long-term evolution of the Episode 58 lava channel

(September 8 to November 30, 2007) Within days of the onset of Episode 58 on July 21, 2008, activity localized on the easternmost eruptive fissure—Fissure D—and channelized lava began flowing to the northeast. Repeated overflows from the channel added slowly to its height, and the channel became perched up to 45 meters above the pre-existing lava surface. The images that

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September 2, 2007

Aerial of eddy in channel near vent D

Aerial of eddy in channel near vent D

August 8, 2007

Looking down the channel of Fissure D

Looking down the channel of Fissure D

July 25, 2007

Collapse and refilling of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater

(June 10 to July 25, 2007) During June 17–19, 2007, an intrusion into Kīlauea's upper east rift zone (Episode 56) led to the cessation of eruptive activity at Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō and the collapse of the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater floor (Poland and others, 2008). The quiet did not last long, though, and lava began to erupt on the floor of the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater in early July (Episode 57). After

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July 13, 2007

Refilling of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater

(July 13, 2007, 14:00:30 to 21:00:36) Episode 57 was driven by the eruption of lava from two vents—one on the west-central part of the crater floor and the other on the eastern side of the crater. This movie shows lava erupting from the eastern of the two vents. Lava can be seen occasionally overtopping levees that formed along the edges of the lava lake. The images that

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July 8, 2007

Refilling of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater

The refilling of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō during Episode 57 was driven by the eruption of lava from two vents—one on the west-central part of the crater floor (to the right) and the other on the eastern side of the crater (to the left). This movie shows the competing interaction between flows from these two vents for a period of several hours on July 8. The images that make up this movie

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USGS
July 9, 1999

A highly endangered native Hawaiian bird species has taken a small but significant step back from the brink of extinction. USGS biologists monitoring 14 captive-reared puaiohi released into the wild earlier this year by The Peregrine Fund say the birds are nesting and have already fledged four young.

USGS
July 8, 1999

Visitors to the Big Island's southeast coast commonly see a steam plume, the telltale sign that Kīlauea's eruption is sending lava into the ocean.

USGS
July 1, 1999

Many readers know that the island of Hawai`i is made of five volcanoes—Kīlauea, Mauna Loa, Hualālai, Mauna Kea, and Kohala. 

USGS
June 24, 1999

Each summer, staff members of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory have participated in student training programs with the University of Hawaii at Hilo (UHH). One of the programs on which HVO scientists have helped is the Rocks and Rolls volcanology session of Na Pua No`eau.

USGS
June 17, 1999

Two magnitude-4.4 earthquakes rocked the Big Island this month. The first occurred on June 3 and was located 13 km (7.8 mi) east of Waimea at a depth of 38.3 km (23 mi). The second was a week later on June 10 and was located 21.3 km (12.8 mi) southeast of Punalu`u at a depth of 52 km (31.2 mi).
 

USGS
June 10, 1999

If you ask volcanologists what the most dangerous part of their job is, they are likely to answer, "flying in helicopters."

USGS
June 3, 1999

Over the years HVO has attempted to maintain its scientific energy, enthusiasm, and insights by melding a permanent staff with a smaller cadre of rotating, research-oriented scientists. The observatory has about one rotating researcher for every four or five permanent staff. Rotating scientists generally stay 3-5 years.

USGS
May 27, 1999

Lava flows are one of the most common hazards produced by active volcanoes. Here in Hawai`i, they may endanger property but seldom endanger people's lives. 

USGS
May 20, 1999

"Wekiu" is the Hawaiian word for top or summit. This name was given to Mauna Kea's tallest cinder cone, which reaches 13,796 feet in elevation and is the highest in the Hawaiian archipelago. Life on the Mauna Kea summit must endure freezing temperatures, winter snow falls, and, occasionally, hurricane-force winds. 

USGS
May 18, 1999

A small population of the endangered Hawaiian bird, palila, is holding steady on the western slopes of Mauna Kea volcano.

USGS
May 13, 1999

May 18 marks the anniversary of the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, which laid waste to over 520 square kilometers (200 square miles) of forest and killed 57 people.

USGS
May 6, 1999

The shaking was finally over. Lower Puna returned to normal following the calamitous episode of ground cracking and subsidence in April 1924. But it was only the calm before the storm.