Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 1, 2018

Map as of 10:00 a.m. HST, June 1, 2018.

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
May 31, 2018

Map as of 2:00 p.m. HST, May 31, 2018.

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
May 31, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 12:15 pm on Thursday, May 31.

Map showing fissure flows
May 31, 2018

Map as of 9:00 a.m. HST, May 31, 2018.

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
May 30, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 12:15 pm on Wednesday, May 30.

Map showing fissure flows
May 30, 2018

Map as of 9:00 a.m. HST, May 30, 2018.

Map showing fissure flows
May 30, 2018

Map as of 3:00 p.m. HST, May 30, 2018.

Map showing fissure flows
May 29, 2018

Map as of 6:00 p.m. HST, May 29, 2018.

Map showing fissure flows
May 28, 2018

Map as of May 28, 2018 3:00 p.m. HST

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
May 28, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 1:15 pm on Monday, May 28.

Map showing fissure flows
May 27, 2018

Map as of 2:30 p.m. HST, May 27, 2018.

Map showing fissure flows
May 26, 2018

Map as of 3:00 p.m. HST, May 26.

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A close-up aerial view of the southern active lava lake margin within Halema‘uma‘u crater, at Kīlauea summit
March 26, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—March 26, 2021

A close-up aerial view of the southern active lava lake margin within Halema‘uma‘u crater, at Kīlauea summit. The formation of the levee containing the “perched” active lava lake (center to upper-right) is partially due to crustal plates from the active lake surface being pushed onto the rim of the lava lake. See the magnified image of the levee (lower-left) for a more

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a comparison of ongoing activity in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea, with a 2007 lava channel on Kīlauea's East Rift Zone
March 26, 2021

A comparison of perched lava lake and lava channel levees—Kīlauea

This figure shows a comparison of ongoing activity in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea, with a 2007 lava channel on Kīlauea's East Rift Zone. On the left, a photo shows the levee that is containing the active perched lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u. The levee is formed in part from rafted pieces of surface crust that are pushed onto the levee by the lake circulation, with

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A telephoto view of the west vent within Halema‘uma‘u crater taken during a HVO helicopter overflight
March 26, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—March 26, 2021

A telephoto view of the west vent within Halema‘uma‘u crater taken during a Hawaiian Volcano Observatory helicopter overflight of Kīlauea summit. The west vent continues to supply lava into the active western portion of the lava lake from two adjacent inlets at its base (center-left). A pile of rubble, from a partial collapse of the cone several weeks ago, remains on the

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During today’s HVO helicopter overflight of the Kīlauea summit eruption, no major changes were observed
March 26, 2021

Views of Kīlauea's summit lava lake on March 26

During today’s HVO helicopter overflight of the Kīlauea summit eruption, no major changes were observed. As the west vent continues to erupt lava into the active lava lake, volcanic gas emissions remain elevated, with a visible plume rising from the western vent (upper-right). The most recent SO2 emission rates were recorded on March 22 at about 950 t/d. USGS

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An aerial view of the western portion of the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater at the summit of Kīlauea
March 26, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—March 26, 2021

An aerial view of the western portion of the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater at the summit of Kīlauea. The west vent (upper-right) continues to erupt lava into the perched active portion of the lava lake. The main island, which remains trapped in place by the solidified lava crust surrounding it, is visible at the bottom of the photo. USGS photo taken by L. DeSmither

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Color map of lava lake temperature
March 26, 2021

March 26, 2021—Kīlauea summit eruption thermal map

A helicopter overflight on March 26, 2021, at approximately 8 a.m. HST allowed for aerial visual and thermal imagery to be collected of the eruption within Halema‘uma‘u crater at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. Active surface lava is largely limited to the western side of the lake; the eastern portion of the lake has stagnated and is dominated by cooling, solidified crust.

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Morning light illuminates the active west vent spatter cones from the ongoing Halema‘uma‘u eruption at Kīlauea summit
March 26, 2021

West vent cones in the ongoing Halema‘uma‘u eruption

Morning light illuminates the active west vent spatter cones from the ongoing Halema‘uma‘u eruption at Kīlauea Volcano's summit on Friday, March 26, 2021. Several of the cones were actively degassing but no spatter or lava flows were observed. USGS Photo by K. Lynn.

A wide view of the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea summit
March 24, 2021

March 24, 2021 view of the Kīlauea summit lava lake and west vent

A wide view of the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea summit, taken on March 24, 2021 at 12:48 p.m. HST. A gas plume rises from the west vent (center-left), which continues to erupt lava into the active western portion of the lava lake (light gray in color). The center and eastern lava lake surface is covered by a darker, stagnant crust. USGS photo taken by D

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The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active
March 23, 2021

View of lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u—Kīlauea—March 23, 2021

The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active. Active surface lava is limited to the western (bottom) portion of the lake between the main island and the western fissure complex. In this view looking east, a 4 meter (13 feet) diameter skylight is visible at the top of the northeastern-most spatter cone (left). USGS photo by N. Deligne on

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The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active
March 22, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—March 22, 2021

The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active. Active surface lava is limited to the western portion of the lake, and is impounded by steep, well-defined levees. USGS photo by M. Patrick on March 22, 2021.

A close up of the inlet where lava from the western fissure feeds into the lake in Halema‘uma‘u
March 22, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—March 22, 2021

A close up of the inlet where lava from the western fissure feeds into the lake in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea. The inlet is formed from two adjacent lava streams. USGS photo by M. Patrick.

Crustal foundering is common in the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u
March 22, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—March 22, 2021

Crustal foundering—less-dense liquid lava overriding and sinking thin surface crust—is common in the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea. Here, large sections of the crust are foundering, resurfacing the lake. USGS photo by M. Patrick on March 22, 2021.

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Color photograph of lava lake
February 9, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

An aerial view of Halema‘uma‘u crater from the northeast during a helicopter overflight of the Kīlauea summit eruption
February 5, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Aerial view of the Hōlei Pali along Kīlauea’s south flank.
February 4, 2021

This story begins after Kīlauea’s May 4, 2018, M6.9 earthquake and lower East Rift Zone eruption. The M6.9 earthquake resulted in seaward motion at the surface of Kīlauea’s south flank of up to approximately 0.5 m (1.5 ft) as measured by Global Positioning System (GPS) monitoring stations operated by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO).

No major changes were observed at the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater during yesterday's helicopter overflight.
February 3, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

This thermal image taken during the February 1 helicopter overflight shows the features of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u
February 2, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

USGS science for a changing world
February 1, 2021

The U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) recorded a magnitude-4.1 earthquake located beneath Kīlauea Volcano's south flank on Monday, February 1, at 2:09 p.m. HST. 

image related to volcanoes. See description
February 1, 2021

HILO, Hawaii — The U.S. Geological Survey has selected Dr. Ken Hon as the new Scientist-in-Charge at the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in Hilo, Hawaii. HVO was founded in 1912 by Dr. Thomas A. Jaggar, and Hon will serve as HVO’s 21rst director.

HVO geologists collect tephra from the December 2020 deposit, found in the Southwest Rift Zone of Kīlauea Volcano
February 1, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

The eruption at Kīlauea summit continues with the west vent supplying lava to the active western lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u 
January 29, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Color photograph of road and crater
January 29, 2021

Join USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientist emeritus Don Swanson on a virtual walk, during which you learn about the past 500 years of Kīlauea Volcano’s history as revealed by rocks, craters, and cracks. This virtual walk will be released in three parts, covering different sections of the Keanakākoʻi Crater trail.

image related to volcanoes. See description
January 28, 2021

In this talk, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Frank Trusdell, who has studied Mauna Loa for two decades, presents a roughly 40-minute talk about Earth’s largest volcano: Mauna Loa.

Islands in Kilauea volcano lava lake in 1917 and 2021
January 28, 2021

Words matter in volcanology just as in the rest of society. Words matter among volcanologists themselves, of course, but they particularly matter in our dealings with the public, when we attempt to both tell what is happening and educate about how volcanoes work. Accuracy of words promotes understanding and clarity of thought and is essential to both telling and educating.