Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Map of flow field...
November 1, 2017

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow field.

Thermal map of flow field...
October 12, 2017

Thermal map over the Episode 61g lava flow.

Map of flow field...
October 12, 2017

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow field. 

Thermal map of flow field...
September 21, 2017

Thermal map over the Episode 61g lava flow. 

Map of flow field...
September 21, 2017

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow field.

Thermal map of flow field...
September 1, 2017

Thermal map over the Episode 61g lava flow.

Map of flow field...
September 1, 2017

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow field.

Map of flow field...
August 20, 2017

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow field. 

Map of flow field...
August 9, 2017

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow field.

Thermal map of flow field...
August 9, 2017

This map is similar to the map above but shows a thermal map over the Episode 61g lava flow. 

Satellite image shows location of breakouts on flow field...
July 30, 2017

This satellite image was captured on Sunday, July 30, by the NASA/USGS Landsat 8 satellite. 

Map of flow field...
July 10, 2017

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow field.

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Near Kīlauea Visitor Center, the Ha‘akulamanu trail within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park passes through the Sulphur Banks area
May 13, 2021

Kīlauea summit overflight - May 13

Near Kīlauea Visitor Center, the Ha‘akulamanu trail within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park passes through the Sulphur Banks area. Fumaroles in this area emit different sulfur gases, including sulfur dioxide (SO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and are sampled approximately every three months by USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory gas geochemists to track

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USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists observed fluid lava on the surface of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit
May 13, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—May 13, 2021

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists observed fluid lava on the surface of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea, while monitoring the eruption on May 13. Two areas of ponded lava exhibited foundering, during which more-dense solidified crust sinks into the lava lake and is replaced by less-dense liquid lava from below. This photo shows the

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The area of solidified crust at the surface of Halema‘uma‘u's lava lake, has been growing over the past several weeks
May 13, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—May 13, 2021

The area of solidified crust at the surface of Halema‘uma‘u's lava lake, at the summit of Kīlauea, has been growing over the past several weeks. This may make it seem that the eruption is over but lava continues to be supplied to the lava lake from below. With National Park Service permission, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists observe this eruption from within

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The eruption in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea, continues
May 13, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—May 13, 2021

The eruption in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea, continues. Gas emissions, last measured on May 12, were 225 tonnes per day. This photo, taken on May 13, shows the bluish-tinged plume of volcanic gas being emitted from the western vent complex within Halema‘uma‘u crater. USGS image by K. Mulliken.

Digital elevation model of crater and lava lake
May 13, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u DEM May 13, 2021

A helicopter overflight on May 13, 2021, at approximately 11:30 a.m. HST allowed for aerial visual and thermal imagery to be collected of the eruption within Halema‘uma‘u crater at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. The visual images were used to create a digital elevation model (DEM) of the crater, shown here. The many islands and levees formed at different times during the

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A wide view of Halema‘uma‘u from the western crater rim, at the summit of Kīlauea
May 12, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u eruption activity on May 12, 2021 — Kīlauea summit

A wide view of Halema‘uma‘u from the western crater rim, at the summit of Kīlauea. The west vent (lower left) continues to supply lava into the lake through a submerged inlet. Much of the western active lava lake surface has crusted over in the last few weeks as the effusion rate remains low. USGS photograph taken by D. Downs on May 12, 2021.

A close up view of the western portion of the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u, at Kīlauea summit
May 12, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u eruption activity on May 12, 2021 — Kīlauea summit

A close up view of the western portion of the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u, at Kīlauea summit. A weak gas plume is emitted from the western fissure vent (left), with the most recent sulfur dioxide emission rate measured at 150 tonnes per day on May 11. USGS photograph taken by D. Downs on May 12, 2021 from the west rim of Halema‘uma‘u.

On the west side of Mauna Loa summit, a campaign GPS (center-right) measures its location for a period of 2–3 days
May 11, 2021

Mauna Loa campaign GPS survey—May 11, 2021

On the west side of Mauna Loa summit, a campaign GPS (center-right) measures its location for a period of 2–3 days. This site has been occupied every year by helicopter since 1994. Mauna Kea, Hualālai and Haleakalā can be seen in the distance. USGS photo taken by S. Conway on May 11, 2021, during the 2021 Mauna Loa GPS campaign survey. 

HVO geophysicists completed the annual high-precision Global Positioning System (GPS) survey of Mauna Loa
May 11, 2021

Global Positioning System (GPS) survey of Mauna Loa recently completed

Recently, HVO geophysicists completed the annual high-precision Global Positioning System (GPS) survey of Mauna Loa. The annual survey supplements HVO's continuous GPS monitoring stations and provides information on vertical and horizontal deformation of the ground surface. These measurements inform HVO about the volume changes within subsurface magma reservoirs at Mauna

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During the annual Mauna Loa GPS campaign, 33 campaign stations are occupied with GPS instruments for days to weeks
May 11, 2021

Annual Mauna Loa GPS Survey—2021

During the annual Mauna Loa GPS campaign, 33 campaign stations are occupied with GPS instruments for days to weeks. The stations are spread across the flanks of the volcano and provide a synoptic picture of deformation on the volcano over the past year. The location of this survey was on the north flank of Mauna Loa, with clear views of Mauna Kea visible in the background

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GPS survey benchmark being occupied on Mauna Loa's north flank
May 11, 2021

Annual Mauna Loa GPS Survey—2021

Another GPS survey benchmark being occupied on Mauna Loa's north flank, with clear views of Mauna Kea in the background. The metal disk on the ground beneath the tripod is the benchmark, which is cemented to the lava flow surface. Each year, the high-precision GPS unit is centered on the benchmark, and the height of the GPS unit on the tripod is accounted for when

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Color map of lava lake at volcano summit
May 7, 2021

May 7, 2021—Kīlauea summit eruption contour map

This map of Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea shows 20 m (66 ft) contour lines (dark gray) that mark locations of equal elevation above sea level (asl). The map shows that the lava lake has filled 229 m (751 ft) of the crater, to an elevation of 746 m (2448 ft) asl since the eruption began on December 20, 2020. Contour lines highlighted in green, purple, and blue mark

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USGS
December 14, 2020

The U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) recorded a magnitude-4.4 earthquake located beneath Mauna Kea's northwest flank on Monday, December 14, at 9:27 a.m., HST. 

image related to volcanoes. See description
December 10, 2020

Though there hasn’t been an eruption in Hawai‘i in 2020, the year has hardly been quiet—earthquake swarms, an elevated alert-level on Mauna Loa, and a growing water lake on Kīlauea are reminders that island residents should be aware of Hawaiʻi’s active volcanoes.  

USGS science for a changing world
December 4, 2020

Magnitude-4.1 earthquake on Mauna Loa’s northwest flank, Island of Hawai‘i

The U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) recorded a magnitude-4.1 earthquake located beneath Mauna Loa's northwest flank on Friday, December 4, at 7:44 a.m., HST. 

Color photograph of volcanic crater lake
December 3, 2020

Timelapse showing surface motion of Kīlauea's summit water lake and small rockfalls at Kīlauea summit

USGS science for a changing world
December 3, 2020

Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. Earthquake activity increased below Kīlauea summit between November 29–December 3, 2020. Kīlauea summit ground deformation rates accompanying the earthquake activity had a brief excursion from trends observed in the past several months; other monitoring data streams remained stable.

Color photograph of tephra
December 3, 2020

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to travel from the depths of Kīlauea and be hurled into the air as a tiny grain of volcanic ash? How high would you go and how far would you fly? Let’s take a look at the theory of airborne rocks to find out!

Color photograph of moon over rift zone
December 2, 2020

Moon over Mauna Loa's Northeast Rift Zone

Image: Lava flow
November 25, 2020

Recall this lava flow crisis from years ago: lava breaks out of the normal confines of the long-lived Puʻu ʻŌʻō eruption, with flows advancing relentlessly towards residential areas downslope.  Over several months, the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and County of Hawai‘i Civil Defense Agency monitor the hazards closely in lower Puna as the situation evolves.   

Grey-scale digital elevation model showing building outlines
November 19, 2020

In volcano-related cartography and geographic analyses, especially in Hawaii, there is perhaps nothing more important than having an accurate digital model of topography. Such models depict the three-dimensional nature of the land, which elucidate features from past eruptions and help us to determine potential pathways of future activity. But how are these models created?

Color photograph of volcanic crater lake
November 16, 2020

No significant changes at Kīlauea's summit water lake

screenshot of LANDFIRE Remap Existing Vegetation Type over Hawaii
November 12, 2020

The fires of Hawaii don’t follow the rules of their continental counterparts. There are fire risk factors at play in the island chain that states like California or Arizona simply don’t deal with.

Colored, shaded-relief terrain map of Brushy Butte Volcano
November 12, 2020

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has 5 volcano observatories tasked with monitoring low to high threat volcanoes throughout the United States.