Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Map of flow field...
June 21, 2017

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow field.

Satellite image shows location of breakouts on flow field...
June 2, 2017

This satellite image was captured on Friday, June 2, by the Sentinel-2 satellite operated by the European Space Agency.

Map of flow field...
May 31, 2017

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow field.

Small-scale map of flow field...
May 3, 2017

This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field in relation to the southeastern part of the Island of Hawai‘i.

Map of flow field...
May 3, 2017

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow field. 

Map of flow field...
April 10, 2017

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow field.

Map of flow field...
March 30, 2017

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow field.

Map of flow field...
March 16, 2017

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow field.

Satellite image shows continued breakouts on flow field...
March 10, 2017

This satellite image was captured on Wednesday, March 8, by the NASA/USGS Landsat 8 satellite.

Map of flow field...
February 24, 2017

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea's East Rift Zone lava flow field. 

Map of flow field...
February 16, 2017

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea's East Rift Zone lava flow field.

The area of the active flow field as of January 12 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the active flow as of Feb
February 16, 2017

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea's East Rift Zone lava flow field. 

Filter Total Items: 2,275
Color photograph of lava lake
May 7, 2021

Lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u - Kīlauea, May 7 2021

The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active, as seen in this view looking northwest. The active surface lava area continues to decrease in size, and activity is weaker, with only occasional localized surface foundering. Incandescent lava is confined to area between western fissure complex (left center) and the main island (lower right).

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Color photograph of lava lake
May 6, 2021

Close-up view of active western portion of Halema‘uma‘u lava lake

This close-up view of the active western portion of the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake at the summit of Kīlauea was captured on Thursday, May 6 through the lens of a laser rangefinder used by HVO scientists to measure distances to features within the crater. HVO scientists observed that the area immediately surrounding the inlet to the lava lake (above-center) was slightly perched

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Color photograph of lava lake
May 6, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, May 6, 2021

View of the active surface lava in the western portion of Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. The west vent (upper left) continues to erupt lava into the lava lake through an inlet near the base of the cone. The active lava lake surface area has decreased in size over the past two weeks since the northeast (right) and southwest (left) surface has been

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Color photograph of lava lake
May 5, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u eruptive activity on 05 May 2021

Lava continues to flow from the western vent (bottom left) into the lava lake at Halema‘uma‘u Crater at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Island of Hawai‘i. A portion of the active surface of the lava lake can be seen here with orange, incandescent lava between the west vent and the main island. This photograph was taken on Wednesday, March 5, 2021, at 12:37 p.m. HST from the

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Hiking along the rim of the 2018 collapse area at the summit of Kīlauea
April 30, 2021

View of Kīlauea summit eruption gas plume from southeast — April 30

While hiking along the rim of the 2018 collapse area at the summit of Kīlauea, HVO scientists visited a site to the southeast of Halema‘uma‘u known as Akanikōlea—a culturally-significant place that is featured in Hawaiian legends. While the lava lake from the ongoing eruption in Halema‘uma‘u is not visible from this vantage point, the gas plume from the eruption is (

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HVO scientists hiked along the closed Crater Rim Road on April 30th to retrieve acoustic (sound) sensors for a scientific study
April 30, 2021

View of Kīlauea's September 1982 lava flow lobe — April 30, 2021

HVO scientists hiked along the closed Crater Rim Road on April 30th to retrieve acoustic (sound) sensors for a scientific study. This section of the road was damaged by earthquake activity during the 2018 Kīlauea summit caldera collapse. This stretch of road traverses part of the September 1982 lava flow, visible as a lobe of black rock on the right of the road. Mauna Loa

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On Friday, April 30, lava continued to erupt from the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano
April 30, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—April 30, 2021

On Friday, April 30, lava continued to erupt from the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. Active surface lava (center of the photo) was limited to the center of the previously active lake surface, where the north (right) and south (left) sides have cooled and crusted over (appearing darker in the image). This photo was taken around 2 p.m. HST from

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The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active
April 27, 2021

View of lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u—Kīlauea, April 27, 2021

The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active, as seen in this view looking north. Active surface lava is limited to the western (left) portion of the lake between the main island and the western fissure complex. The active lava surface area has decreased in size over the past week, but remains perched approximately 3 meters (10 ft) higher

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On Monday, April 26, 2021, lava continued to flow from the western vent into the active lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u Crater
April 26, 2021

View of Halema‘uma‘u lava lake from the west, April 26, 2021

On Monday, April 26, 2021, lava continued to flow from the western vent (bottom left) into the active lava lake (center) in Halema‘uma‘u Crater at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. The active lava lake surface continues to shrink as areas on the north (upper left) and south (center right) sides cool and solidify. This photograph was taken at 1:03 p.m. HST from the west rim of

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A close-up view of the west vent spatter cones and lava lake inlet in Halema‘uma‘u Crater at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano
April 26, 2021

Close-up view of the west vent and inlet at Halema‘uma‘u

A close-up view of the west vent spatter cones (bottom left) and inlet where lava is entering the lava lake (center right) in Halema‘uma‘u Crater at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. A piece of crust, that solidified near the inlet, broke off and was being transported away from the inlet. This photograph was taken on April 26, 2021, at 1:51 p.m. HST from the west rim of

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April 26, 2021

EarthShots — Satellite Images of Environmental Change

The US Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observation and Science Center, or "EROS" archive’s data from the LandSat satellites which have been in operation from 1972 to the present day. EarthShots presents environmental changes using Landsat images. 
 

Color photograph of lava lake surface
April 23, 2021

April 22, 2021- Close-up view of Halema‘uma‘u lava lake crusting-over

This zoomed-in photo of the far southwest end of the active lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea's summit was captured on Thursday, April 22, and it illustrates the process by which parts of the lava lake become inactive. This area, which had seen substantial lava circulation as recently as last week, now has a stagnant pāhoehoe crust that sits 2–3 m (7–10 ft) lower

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Filter Total Items: 2,324
image related to volcanoes. See description
November 6, 2020

This work, recently published in the scientific journal Nature Communications, discusses the events leading up to Kīlauea's 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption and summit collapse. The paper details how the 2018 eruption evolved as a sequence of cascading events, allowing minor changes to cause major destruction and historic changes across the volcano. 

Color photograph of volcanic crater lake
November 5, 2020

Famous for glowing red lava and billowing volcanic plumes, Halema‘uma‘u has long inspired poets, painters and photographers to find meaning in the color and light of this dynamic landscape. 

Animated GIF showing rise of crater lake
November 4, 2020

Kīlauea summit water lake changes over the past year

Map showing earthquake epicenters (blue circles) from a shallow seismic swarm that began on October 23rd, 2020.
October 29, 2020

On the evening of Thursday, October 22nd, people living near the summit of Kīlauea Volcano began to feel a series of earthquakes.  They were small, and some could even be mistaken for a strong gust of wind blowing against the house. 

USGS science for a changing world
October 23, 2020

Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. A small swarm of shallow seismicity over the past 24 hours has occurred near the Ka‘ōiki fault system, northwest of Kīlauea's summit. Other Kīlauea monitoring data streams remain stable and show no signs of increased activity.

Color photograph of charcoal and overlying lava flow, rock hammer for scale
October 22, 2020

One of the fundamental premises of geology is that the "key to understanding the future is to understand the past."  In order to forecast how a volcano will behave, geologists must map the deposits from past eruptions and determine the ages of those deposits. Radiocarbon dating is our principal tool of use.

Color photograph of two scientists sampling a volcanic fumarole
October 20, 2020

Direct gas sampling at Sulphur Banks on September 30, 2020

UH-Hilo geology majors measure vertical offset of Hilina Pali road on Kulanaokuaiki Pali in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park
October 15, 2020

The Koa‘e fault system connects Kīlauea’s East and Southwest Rift Zones south of the caldera. Faults here appear as low cliffs, or “scarps” along Hilina Pali Road in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. These fault-cliffs slip during major earthquakes, such as those of May 4, 2018—near the beginning of Kīlauea’s 2018 eruption.

No significant changes at Kīlauea's summit water lake
October 14, 2020

No significant changes at Kīlauea's summit water lake

Comparison photos of the floor of Kīlauea Caldera from the foot of the Halema‘uma‘u Trail in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, fr
October 9, 2020

Comparison photos of the floor of Kīlauea caldera

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory library after the magnitude-6.6 Ka‘ōiki earthquake on 1983 November 16.
October 8, 2020

Major earthquakes cannot be predicted. Successful earthquake predictions need to have three things correct: the location, the time, and the magnitude. The best anyone can reliably do is get two out of three correct. And the most important thing for everyone to do is prepare—have a plan, build a kit, and practice drills. Join us for the ShakeOut on October 15th!