Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Map of flow field...
February 16, 2017

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea's East Rift Zone lava flow field.

The area of the active flow field as of January 12 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the active flow as of Feb
February 16, 2017

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea's East Rift Zone lava flow field. 

Map of flow field...
January 12, 2017

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow field. 

Kamokuna ocean entry map...
January 3, 2017

This map shows the coastline at the Kamokuna lava entry on Kīlauea Volcano, with labels denoting areas impacted by the large, progressive lava-delta collapse on December 31, 2016. 

Digital Elevation Model in the Atchafalaya Basin, LA
April 19, 2016

The 3DEP products and services available through The National Map consist of standard digital elevation models (DEMs) at various horizontal resolutions, elevation source and associated datasets, an elevation point query service and bulk point query service. All 3DEP products are available, free of charge and without use restrictions.

Map with thermal overlay showing active flows...
December 30, 2015

This map overlays a georeferenced thermal image mosaic onto a map of the flow field near Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō; to show the distribution of active and recently active breakouts.

Map showing flow field changes...
December 3, 2015

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field.

Small-scale map of flow field...
December 3, 2015

This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to the eastern part of the Island of Hawai‘i. 

Satellite image shows June 27th lava flow...
November 30, 2015

This satellite image was captured on Monday, November 30, by the Advanced Land Imager instrument onboard NASA's Earth Observing 1 satellite. 

Small-scale map of flow field...
November 12, 2015

This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow in relation to the eastern part of the Island of Hawai‘i. 

Map showing flow field changes...
November 12, 2015

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field.

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Color photograph of lava lake
May 18, 2021

Close-up view of remaining lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u, May 18, 2021

This close-up view of the of the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake at the summit of Kīlauea was captured on Tuesday, May 18. During an approximately one-hour visit to the crater rim, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists' only observation of active lava was the crustal foundering event captured here, which lasted approximately five minutes. All that remains of the active lava

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May 17, 2021

Thermal timelapse of summit lava lake

The lava lake in Halemaʻumaʻu crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active but has diminished in area and vigor over the past month. This thermal timelapse sequence shows the changes in the lake activity over the past month. In mid-April the area of active surface lava in the lake was approximately 7.5 acres (3 hectares). By mid-May the area was about 0.5 acres (0.2

Color photograph of caldera
May 15, 2021

Routine visit to Mauna Loa summit

On May 15, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists did a routine hike to the summit of Mauna Loa and inspected summit monitoring equipment. Clear weather provided good views across the floor of Moku‘āweoweo, Mauna Loa's summit caldera, and nothing unusual was observed.

Color photograph of caldera
May 15, 2021

Routine visit to Mauna Loa summit

A USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist inspects the thermal camera at the summit of Mauna Loa on May 15, 2021.

The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active
May 14, 2021

View of the active lava lake area in Halema‘uma‘u—Kīlauea, May 14

The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active, although surface incandescence (glowing red lava) has become less frequent over the last few days. In this view looking northwest, two elongated lobes oriented west (left) to east (right) with a relatively smooth shiny grey surface are visible in the center of the photo. These two lobes

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USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists conducted an overflight of Kīlauea's summit on the morning of May 13
May 13, 2021

Kīlauea summit overflight - May 13

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists conducted an overflight of Kīlauea's summit on the morning of May 13. Though no incandescence was visible during the overflight, field crews monitoring the ongoing eruption in Halema‘uma‘u from the ground observed a small amount of fluid lava on the surface later in the day. In this aerial photo, the west vent area is in the

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More of Kīlauea's lava lake surface in Halema‘uma‘u crater has solidified in recent weeks, evident in this May 13 aerial view
May 13, 2021

Kīlauea summit overflight - May 13

More of Kīlauea's lava lake surface in Halema‘uma‘u crater has solidified in recent weeks, as is evident in this aerial view taken yesterday, May 13. However, gas emissions and small patches of active lava on the surface indicate that the eruption continues. Most recently, gas emissions were measured as 225 tonnes per day on May 12. The bluish-tinged plume of volcanic gas

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A low, oblique aerial view of the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea's summit
May 13, 2021

Kīlauea summit overflight - May 13

A low, oblique aerial view of the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea's summit (upper right) taken during an overflight on May 13. The area of active lava has slowly been decreasing in recent weeks, but not all of the lava lake surface has stagnated. Portions of the lake surface continue to resurface via a process called foundering. During foundering, the dense solidified

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Near Kīlauea Visitor Center, the Ha‘akulamanu trail within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park passes through the Sulphur Banks area
May 13, 2021

Kīlauea summit overflight - May 13

Near Kīlauea Visitor Center, the Ha‘akulamanu trail within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park passes through the Sulphur Banks area. Fumaroles in this area emit different sulfur gases, including sulfur dioxide (SO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and are sampled approximately every three months by USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory gas geochemists to track

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USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists observed fluid lava on the surface of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit
May 13, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—May 13, 2021

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists observed fluid lava on the surface of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea, while monitoring the eruption on May 13. Two areas of ponded lava exhibited foundering, during which more-dense solidified crust sinks into the lava lake and is replaced by less-dense liquid lava from below. This photo shows the

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The area of solidified crust at the surface of Halema‘uma‘u's lava lake, has been growing over the past several weeks
May 13, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—May 13, 2021

The area of solidified crust at the surface of Halema‘uma‘u's lava lake, at the summit of Kīlauea, has been growing over the past several weeks. This may make it seem that the eruption is over but lava continues to be supplied to the lava lake from below. With National Park Service permission, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists observe this eruption from within

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The eruption in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea, continues
May 13, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—May 13, 2021

The eruption in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea, continues. Gas emissions, last measured on May 12, were 225 tonnes per day. This photo, taken on May 13, shows the bluish-tinged plume of volcanic gas being emitted from the western vent complex within Halema‘uma‘u crater. USGS image by K. Mulliken.

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USGS science for a changing world
October 23, 2020

Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. A small swarm of shallow seismicity over the past 24 hours has occurred near the Ka‘ōiki fault system, northwest of Kīlauea's summit. Other Kīlauea monitoring data streams remain stable and show no signs of increased activity.

Color photograph of charcoal and overlying lava flow, rock hammer for scale
October 22, 2020

One of the fundamental premises of geology is that the "key to understanding the future is to understand the past."  In order to forecast how a volcano will behave, geologists must map the deposits from past eruptions and determine the ages of those deposits. Radiocarbon dating is our principal tool of use.

Color photograph of two scientists sampling a volcanic fumarole
October 20, 2020

Direct gas sampling at Sulphur Banks on September 30, 2020

UH-Hilo geology majors measure vertical offset of Hilina Pali road on Kulanaokuaiki Pali in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park
October 15, 2020

The Koa‘e fault system connects Kīlauea’s East and Southwest Rift Zones south of the caldera. Faults here appear as low cliffs, or “scarps” along Hilina Pali Road in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. These fault-cliffs slip during major earthquakes, such as those of May 4, 2018—near the beginning of Kīlauea’s 2018 eruption.

No significant changes at Kīlauea's summit water lake
October 14, 2020

No significant changes at Kīlauea's summit water lake

Comparison photos of the floor of Kīlauea Caldera from the foot of the Halema‘uma‘u Trail in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, fr
October 9, 2020

Comparison photos of the floor of Kīlauea caldera

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory library after the magnitude-6.6 Ka‘ōiki earthquake on 1983 November 16.
October 8, 2020

Major earthquakes cannot be predicted. Successful earthquake predictions need to have three things correct: the location, the time, and the magnitude. The best anyone can reliably do is get two out of three correct. And the most important thing for everyone to do is prepare—have a plan, build a kit, and practice drills. Join us for the ShakeOut on October 15th!

image related to volcanoes. See description
October 2, 2020

A news release published by Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on September 30, 2020, announces a report summarizing initial public input about the disaster recovery project to repair and/or replace critical infrastructure in the park, and U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory facilities and equipment damaged during the 2018 eruption and summit collapse of Kīlauea Volcano.

Color photograph of earthquake report
October 1, 2020

Residents on the Island of Hawaiʻi are accustomed to feeling earthquakes. As the ground shaking subsides and the safety of everyone around is assured, one of the first questions we typically ask is “how big was that earthquake?”