Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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video thumbnail: Mauna Loa Volcano Hawaii -- 1930s Eruption (Part 2 of 5)
December 31, 1929

Mauna Loa Volcano Hawaii -- 1930s Eruption (Part 2 of 5)

Part 2 of 5

Remarkable silent film, 16mm Kodachrome movie film. Probably the first color film ever made of a volcanic eruption. Mokuaweoweo Crater eruption filmed probably in late 1935 by Harold T. Stearns, a USGS Hydrologist-Volcanologist. The lava fountains are hundreds of feet high, the erupting fissure inside the crater is about two thousand feet long. The

video thumbnail: Mauna Loa Volcano Hawaii -- 1930s Eruption (Part 3 of 5)
December 31, 1929

Mauna Loa Volcano Hawaii -- 1930s Eruption (Part 3 of 5)

Part 3 of 5

Remarkable silent film, 16mm Kodachrome movie film. Probably the first color film ever made of a volcanic eruption. Mokuaweoweo Crater eruption filmed probably in late 1935 by Harold T. Stearns, a USGS Hydrologist-Volcanologist. The lava fountains are hundreds of feet high, the erupting fissure inside the crater is about two thousand feet long. The

video thumbnail: Mauna Loa Volcano Hawaii -- 1930s Eruption (Part 4 of 5)
December 31, 1929

Mauna Loa Volcano Hawaii -- 1930s Eruption (Part 4 of 5)

Part 4 of 5

Remarkable silent film, 16mm Kodachrome movie film. Probably the first color film ever made of a volcanic eruption. Mokuaweoweo Crater eruption filmed probably in late 1935 by Harold T. Stearns, a USGS Hydrologist-Volcanologist. The lava fountains are hundreds of feet high, the erupting fissure inside the crater is about two thousand feet long. The

video thumbnail: Mauna Loa Volcano Hawaii -- 1930s Eruption (Part 5 of 5)
December 31, 1929

Mauna Loa Volcano Hawaii -- 1930s Eruption (Part 5 of 5)

Part 5 of 5

Remarkable silent film, 16mm Kodachrome movie film. Probably the first color film ever made of a volcanic eruption. Mokuaweoweo Crater eruption filmed probably in late 1935 by Harold T. Stearns, a USGS Hydrologist-Volcanologist. The lava fountains are hundreds of feet high, the erupting fissure inside the crater is about two thousand feet long. The

Ejected tephra from Halemaumau at Kīlauea Volcano, May 31, 1924...
May 31, 1924

Ejected tephra from Halemaumau at Kīlauea, May 31, 1925

This scene west of Halemaumau looks toward the rim of the caldera, southwest of Uēkahuna Bluff. New ballistic blocks and ash from the 1924 eruption coat the floor of the caldera.

Airplane landing field at Kīlauea Volcano strewn with blocks from s...
May 22, 1924

Airplane landing field at Kīlauea strewn with blocks from several e...

Prior to the eruption of 1924, this area was swept clean and used as a landing field for airplanes. This view looking toward the north rim of Halemaumau shows the air field littered with ballistic blocks from explosions in the 1924 eruption.

Explosion from Halemaumau at Kīlauea Volcano as viewed from Uēkahun...
May 18, 1924

Explosion from Halemaumau at Kīlauea May 18, 1924.

This was probably the strongest explosion of the eruption. Rocks and debris fell among spectators southeast of Halemaumau, causing one fatality. A torrential downpour and an electrical storm followed.

Spectators flee explosion from Halemaumau at Kīlauea Volcano, 1114 ...
May 18, 1924

Spectators flee explosion from Halemaumau at Kīlauea, May 18, 1925

Acting HVO director Ruy Finch snapped this photograph of spectators running away as large blocks were tossed about 600 meters (2000 feet) onto an airplane landing field. Lorrin A. Thurston provided this description: "About three minutes later with a sudden dull roar a column of inky black eruption cloud shot upward from the pit and great masses of gray ash rolled out from

...
Park superintendent Thomas Boles after a narrow escape at Kīlauea V...
May 14, 1924

Park superintendent Thomas Boles after a narrow escape at Kīlauea, ...

Boles poses on the grounds of the Volcano House hotel with the Halemaumau eruption plume in the background. He fell cutting his hands and a knee while fleeing an explosion the day before. After his close call the superintendent barred all public access within two miles of Halemaumau.

Explosion at Halemaumau as seen from Uēkahuna Bluff, at Kīlauea Vol...
May 13, 1924

Explosion at Halema‘uma‘u as seen from Uēkahuna Bluff, at Kīlauea, ...

Eight persons, including newspaper and movie men observing the scene at Halema‘uma‘u, were caught in a rain of hot rocks from this explosion. The rocks emitted hissing sounds as hot gas, mainly steam, escaped from them. Park superintendent Thomas Boles was knocked down twice by this bombardment.

Observer examines boulder ejected from Halemaumau, at Kīlauea Volca...
May 11, 1924

Boulder ejected from Halemaumau, at Kīlauea, May 11, 1925

On May 11, Ruy Finch and W.O. Clark visited Halemaumau and found a rock fragment weighing about 180 kg (400 pounds) that had been thrown 60 meters (200 feet) from the rim of the crater.

One of the first explosion clouds from Halemaumau, at Kīlauea Volca...
May 10, 1924

First explosion clouds from Halemaumau, Kīlauea 1925

Later scientists at the Observatory listed May 10 as the first day of the eruptive series. Between this date and May 27, they carefully recorded all explosions, ballistic falls, electric storms, and muddy rains as well as earthquakes felt and recorded on seismographs.

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USGS
April 22, 1994

The past week has been eventful with many changes in the on-going eruption. The eruption stopped once again starting Thursday, April 14, in the afternoon, and lava had stopped entering the ocean by about 5 p.m.
 

USGS
April 15, 1994

The eruption along Kīlauea's east rift zone continues without interruption. The lava is erupting from two vents, which we call the episode 51 and 53 vents, located on the west and south flanks of the Pu'u 'O'o cone, and transported downslope in a long-lived tube system.

USGS
April 8, 1994

The U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is located adjacent to the Thomas Jaggar Museum on the rim of Kīlauea caldera. The Observatory was founded in 1912 as a laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology by Thomas A. Jaggar, a pioneering volcanologist.
 

USGS
April 1, 1994

April 2 marks the anniversary of the largest earthquake to occur in the Hawaiian Islands in historic time. This great earthquake occurred in 1868 and had an estimated magnitude of 7.9.

USGS
March 25, 1994

Friday, March 25, marked the tenth anniversary of the last eruption of Mauna Loa Volcano. The 1984 eruption followed a nine-year period of quiescence. Roughly three years of increasing frequency of shallow- and intermediate-depth earthquakes preceded the eruption.

USGS
March 18, 1994

Following the spectacular display of steam explosions and lava fountaining at the ocean entries last week, this week began with another pause in the eruption. By last Sunday morning, lava had stopped entering the ocean, and the lava tube upslope was drained and empty, although still brightly glowing.
 

Volcano erupts in big show
March 11, 1994

Lava activity at the coast where the flows enter the ocean has been spectacular this past week. The activity has included high lava spattering and formation of three new cones along the ocean entries. On Friday, March 4, explosions began at the coast and intensified during the day. 

USGS
March 4, 1994

The 11-year-long eruption on Kīlauea's East Rift Zone took a brief pause on Thursday, but activity resumed within a matter of hours. 
 

The hazards of post and pier foundations...
February 25, 1994

The column last week summarized the types of damage to structures resulting from shaking during large earthquakes beneath Hawai‘i.

USGS
February 18, 1994

Over the last several weeks, we have run suggestions of specific things that you can do to reduce your exposure to damage caused by earthquakes. 

Dangerous ledge collapses becoming more common...
February 11, 1994

Lava from the 11-year long eruption along Kīlauea's East Rift Zone continues to pour into the ocean near Kamoamoa inside Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. 

USGS
February 4, 1994

The magnitude-5.2 earthquake that occurred at 12:02 a.m. Tuesday morning served as a not-so-gentle reminder of the seismic hazard on the Island of Hawai‘i. The quake was felt throughout the State, with reports from as far away as Kapa'a, Kaua‘i.