Unified Interior Regions

Hawaii

The Pacific Region has nine USGS Science Centers in California, Nevada, and Hawaii. The Regional Office, headquartered in Sacramento, provides Center oversight and support, facilitates internal and external collaborations, and works to further USGS strategic science directions.

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Filter Total Items: 366
Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 27, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Wednesday, June 27

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 26, 2018

Map as of 10:00 a.m. HST, June 26, 2018.

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 26, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Tuesday, June 26

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 25, 2018

Map as of 2:00 p.m. HST, June 25, 2018

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 24, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Sunday, June 24

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 22, 2018

Map as of 2:00 p.m. HST, June 22, 2018

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 21, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Thursday, June 21.

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 19, 2018

Map as of 1:00 p.m. HST, June 19, 2018

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 19, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Tuesday, June 19

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 18, 2018

Map as of 9:00 a.m. HST, June 18, 2018

Thermal map of fissure system and lava flows
June 16, 2018

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 am on Saturday, June 16.

Map showing lower East Rift Zone lava flows and fissures
June 15, 2018

Map as of 10:00 a.m. HST, June 15, 2018

Filter Total Items: 114
Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2001

Seismic hazard in Hawaii: High rate of large earthquakes and probabilistics ground-motion maps

The seismic hazard and earthquake occurrence rates in Hawaii are locally as high as that near the most hazardous faults elsewhere in the United States. We have generated maps of peak ground acceleration (PGA) and spectral acceleration (SA) (at 0.2, 0.3 and 1.0 sec, 5% critical damping) at 2% and 10% exceedance probabilities in 50 years. The...

Klein, F. W.; Frankel, A.D.; Mueller, C.S.; Wesson, R.L.; Okubo, P.G.
Seismic hazard in Hawaii: High rate of large earthquakes and probabilistics ground-motion maps; 2001; Article; Journal; Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America; Klein, F. W.; Frankel, A. D.; Mueller, C. S.; Wesson, R. L.; Okubo, P. G.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2000

Site Selection for a Deep Monitor Well, Kualapuu, Molokai, Hawaii

Management of the ground-water resources near Kualapuu on the island of Molokai, Hawaii, is hindered by the uncertainty in the vertical salinity structure in the aquifer. In the State of Hawaii, vertical profiles of ground-water salinity are commonly obtained from deep monitor wells, and these profiles are used to estimate the thicknesses of the...

Oki, Delwyn S.
Site Selection for a Deep Monitor Well, Kualapuu, Molokai, Hawaii; 2000; WRI; 99-4291; Oki, Delwyn S.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2000

Gravitational stability of three-dimensional stratovolcano edifices

Catastrophic flank collapses have occurred at many stratovolcanoes worldwide. We present a three-dimensional (3-D) slope stability analysis for assessing and quantifying both the locations of minimum edifice stability and the expected volumes of potential failure. Our approach can search the materials underlying a topographic surface, represented...

Reid, M.E.; Christian, S.B.; Brien, D.L.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 1996

Summary of the Oahu, Hawaii, Regional Aquifer-System Analysis

Oahu, the third largest of the Hawaiian islands, is formed by the eroded remnants of two elongated shield volcanoes with broad, low profiles. Weathering and erosion have modified the original domed surfaces of the volcanoes, leaving a landscape of deep valleys and steep interfluvial ridges in the interior highlands. The Koolau Range in eastern...

Nichols, William D.; Shade, Patricia J.; Hunt, Charles D.
Summary of the Oahu, Hawaii, Regional Aquifer-System Analysis; 1996; PP; 1412-A; Nichols, William D.; Shade, Patricia J.; Hunt, Charles D., Jr.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 1995

Estimated Water Use in 1990, Island of Kauai, Hawaii

The estimated total quantity of freshwater withdrawn on the island of Kauai, Hawaii, in 1990 was 370.84 million gallons per day of which 46.29 million gallons per day (12 percent) was from ground-water sources, and 324.55 million gallons per day (88 percent) was from surface-water sources. An additional estimated 40.94 million gallons per day of...

Shade, Patricia J.
Estimated Water Use in 1990, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; 1995; WRI; 93-4180; Shade, Patricia J.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 1990

National water summary 1987: Hydrologic events and water supply and use

Water use in the United States, as measured by freshwater withdrawals in 1985, averaged 338,000 Mgal/d (million gallons per day), which is enough water to cover the 48 conterminous States to a depth of about 2.4 inches. Only 92,300 Mgal/d, or 27.3 percent of the water withdrawn, was consumptive use and thus lost to immediate further use; the...

Carr, Jerry E.; Chase, Edith B.; Paulson, Richard W.; Moody, David W.
National water summary 1987: hydrologic events and water supply and use; 1990; WSP; 2350; Carr, Jerry E.; Chase, Edith B.; Paulson, Richard W.; Moody, David W.

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A wide view of the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea summit
March 24, 2021

March 24, 2021 view of the Kīlauea summit lava lake and west vent

A wide view of the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea summit, taken on March 24, 2021 at 12:48 p.m. HST. A gas plume rises from the west vent (center-left), which continues to erupt lava into the active western portion of the lava lake (light gray in color). The center and eastern lava lake surface is covered by a darker, stagnant crust. USGS photo taken by D

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The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active
March 23, 2021

View of lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u—Kīlauea—March 23, 2021

The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active. Active surface lava is limited to the western (bottom) portion of the lake between the main island and the western fissure complex. In this view looking east, a 4 meter (13 feet) diameter skylight is visible at the top of the northeastern-most spatter cone (left). USGS photo by N. Deligne on

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The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active
March 22, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—March 22, 2021

The lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active. Active surface lava is limited to the western portion of the lake, and is impounded by steep, well-defined levees. USGS photo by M. Patrick on March 22, 2021.

A close up of the inlet where lava from the western fissure feeds into the lake in Halema‘uma‘u
March 22, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—March 22, 2021

A close up of the inlet where lava from the western fissure feeds into the lake in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea. The inlet is formed from two adjacent lava streams. USGS photo by M. Patrick.

Crustal foundering is common in the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u
March 22, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—March 22, 2021

Crustal foundering—less-dense liquid lava overriding and sinking thin surface crust—is common in the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea. Here, large sections of the crust are foundering, resurfacing the lake. USGS photo by M. Patrick on March 22, 2021.

This photo shows one of the islands near the inlet in the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u
March 22, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—March 22, 2021

This photo shows one of the islands near the inlet in the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea. Over the past two weeks, the island has tilted 90 degrees, producing the vertical layering visible here. USGS photo by M. Patrick on March 22, 2021.

A photo of the levee that bounds the southern margin of the active lake in Halema‘uma‘u
March 22, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—March 22, 2021

This photo shows the levee that bounds the southern margin of the active lake in Halema‘uma‘u. The levee is formed, in part, by numerous small crustal plates pushed over the rim. USGS photo by M. Patrick on March 22, 2021.

The northern portion of the active lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea
March 22, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—March 22, 2021

This photo shows the northern portion of the active lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea. Like the southern portion of the lake, this northern zone is also contained by steep, well-defined levees. USGS photo by M. Patrick on March 22, 2021.

Lava continued to erupt from the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea Volcano's summit
March 18, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u Eruption Activity on 18 March 2021

On Thursday, March 18, lava continued to erupt from the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea Volcano's summit. Two lava inlets near the base of the west vent (center) supply lava into the lava lake. This photo was taken around 7:15 a.m. HST from the south rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater, in an area within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park that remains closed to the public

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March 18, 2021—west vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea Volcano's summit
March 18, 2021

March 18, 2021—West vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea summit

On March 18, 2021, morning light illuminated the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea Volcano's summit. Small collapses of the cone have accumulated into a loose pile of rubble (left) on the stagnant crust at its base—adjacent to the active lava lake (lower-right). USGS photo by K. Lynn.

Active lava lake at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano
March 17, 2021

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake, Kīlauea summit eruption—March 17, 2021

On St. Patrick's Day, March 17, 2021, a rainbow was observed adjacent to the active lava lake at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. This photo was taken around 11:00 a.m. HST from the south rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater. In the nearly three months since the eruption started on December 20, 2020, the active surface of the lava lake has risen to approximately 222 m (728 ft). USGS

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View of the lava lake from the south rim of Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea
March 15, 2021

View of lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u - Kīlauea, March 15, 2021

View of the lava lake from the south rim of Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea, looking north. The western (left) portion of the lava lake remains active, with small scale crustal foundering events. Lava enters the lake at two sources approximately 20 to 30 meters (65 to 100 ft) apart at the base of the western vent spatter cone. The western active lava lake has been

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Filter Total Items: 2,251
image related to volcanoes. See description
January 28, 2021

In this talk, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Frank Trusdell, who has studied Mauna Loa for two decades, presents a roughly 40-minute talk about Earth’s largest volcano: Mauna Loa.

Islands in Kilauea volcano lava lake in 1917 and 2021
January 28, 2021

Words matter in volcanology just as in the rest of society. Words matter among volcanologists themselves, of course, but they particularly matter in our dealings with the public, when we attempt to both tell what is happening and educate about how volcanoes work. Accuracy of words promotes understanding and clarity of thought and is essential to both telling and educating.

This telephoto image shows the west vent of the ongoing Halema‘uma‘u eruption at about 7:15 a.m. HST on January 14, 2021
January 27, 2021

In this talk, USGS HVO scientists who monitor the eruption that began in Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit on December 20, 2020, share their insights and observations. HVO scientists monitor the eruption with permission from Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. 

Color photograph of volcanic vent
January 27, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Color photograph of volcanic vent
January 26, 2021

The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) is announcing a revised Volcano Awareness Month schedule of recorded programs.  Programs, which are typically offered throughout the month of January, were temporarily postponed due to the eruption that began in Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea’s summit within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on December 20, 2020. 

Color photograph of active lava
January 25, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Color photograph of volcanic vent and lava lake
January 22, 2021

Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Color and gray scale images of tephra
January 21, 2021

Every rock on Earth is made of up a unique combination of chemical elements, and lavas/tephra formed during Hawaiian eruptions are no exception. What is the geochemistry of Kīlauea’s newest tephra—and how can it help us understand the processes driving the ongoing eruption

Color photograph of lava lake
January 20, 2021

The eruption in Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea's summit on the Island of Hawai‘i continues, with the west vent erupting lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

Color photograph of volcanic vent
January 19, 2021

On the Island of Hawai‘i, Kīlauea Volcano's summit eruption continues, with the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupting lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

The west vent within Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea's summit exhibited low fountaining from the west vent yesterday
January 15, 2021

The eruption in Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea's summit on the Island of Hawai‘i continues, with the west vent erupting lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

USGS science for a changing world
January 14, 2021

The U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) recorded a magnitude-4.0 earthquake located beneath the south part of the Island of Hawai‘i, in the district of Kaʻū, on Thursday, January 14, at 6:15 p.m., HST.