Unified Interior Regions

Maryland

Maryland's water supply comes from streams, rivers, groundwater and reservoirs. Many of these systems flow to the Chesapeake Bay, the Nation's largest estuary. This complex ecosystem has been degraded due to the impact of human-population increase. The MD-DC-DE Water Science Center studies the impacts this has on water quality, habitats and biological communities.

Maryland Water

Maryland - Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

Maryland -  Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

5522 Research Park Drive
Catonsville, MD 21228

Phone: 443-498-5500
Fax: 442-498-5510

MD-DE-DC Water

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

12100 Beech Forest Road
Laurel, MD 20708-4039

Phone: 301-497-5000

Patuxent Research

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 107
Date published: March 16, 2018
Status: Active

Surface Elevation Table

The Surface Elevation Table (SET) is a portable mechanical leveling device for measuring the relative elevation change of wetland sediments. This website presents information on the purpose, design, and use of the SET. The website is specifically designed to be a forum for researchers in wetland science who use or might use the device and to offer more information about the proper use of the...

Contacts: Donald Cahoon, Ph.D., James C Lynch, Phillipe Hensel
Date published: March 14, 2018
Status: Active

Disease Resistance of Wildlife Species: how the immune system evolves and adapts

The Challenge: In an era when emerging infectious diseases are steadily increasing, human populations are exposed to virulent new pathogens.  Insight into the human system can be gained from understanding the variety of immune adaptations of wildlife species.  The vertebrate immune system is not static.  Rather, it involves in response to the environment.

Date published: March 14, 2018
Status: Completed

Shoreline Changes and Impacts to Natural Resources in Chesapeake Bay

This project aims to improve our understanding of the impacts of shoreline hardening on aquatic ecosystems.

Date published: February 21, 2018
Status: Completed

Genomic and Behavioral Effects of the Neonicotinoid Imidacloprid in Birds Exposed Through Pesticide-Coated Seeds

The Challenge: Neonicotinoid pesticides act as agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and are designed to be lethal to insects while theoretically posing little to no threat to vertebrates. The perceived safety of neonicotinoids has led to a sharp increase in their use in the United States and globally, since they were first introduced in 1994. The use of the neonicotinoid...

Date published: January 24, 2018
Status: Active

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Science Summary—The Role of Storms on Bank Erosion Rates and Sediment Transport in Urban Areas

Sediment is a major pollutant degrading aquatic ecosystems in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The USGS is conducting studies to determine the relative importance of streambank erosion to other sediment sources, such as upland erosion, in both agricultural and urban areas. The information is necessary so resource managers can focus on the types, and locations, of practices that will be most...

Date published: January 23, 2018
Status: Active

Scenario-Based Assessments for Coastal Change Hazard Forecasts

A decade of USGS research on storm-driven coastal change hazards has provided the data and modeling capabilities needed to identify areas of our coastline that are likely to experience extreme and potentially hazardous erosion during an extreme storm.

Contacts: Kara Doran
Date published: January 18, 2018
Status: Active

Forecasting Coastal Change

This project focuses on understanding the magnitude and variability of extreme storm impacts on sandy beaches. The overall objective is to improve real-time and scenario-based predictions of coastal change to support management of coastal infrastructure, resources, and safety. 

Contacts: Kara Doran
Date published: January 18, 2018
Status: Active

National Assessment of Coastal Vulnerability to Sea Level Rise

The original national coastal vulnerability index (CVI) assessment was motivated by expected accelerated sea-level rise (SLR) and the uncertainty in the response of the coastline to SLR. This research was conducted between 1999 and 2001, and is currently being updated using new data sources and methodology. This original study was part of the ...

Date published: January 18, 2018
Status: Active

Long-Term Coastal Change

Goals of this task include developing and improving coastal-change assessments and supporting long-term planning and decision making to ensure sustainable coastal economies, infrastructure, and ecosystems.

Date published: January 17, 2018
Status: Completed

Conowingo Dam Above 90 Percent Capacity For Sediment Storage

The Conowingo Dam on the Susquehanna River is at about 92 percent capacity for sediment storage according to new U.S. Geological Survey research.

Filter Total Items: 59
video thumbnail: Multi-agency coordination leads to successful dam removal, Simkins Dam, Patapsco River Maryland
March 22, 2011

Multi-agency coordination leads to successful dam removal, Simkins Dam, Patapsco River Maryland

Faith Fitzpatrick (U.S. Geological Survey) and Serena McClain (American Rivers, Director, River Restoration) discuss the history of how the dam removal became possible. Allen Gellis (USGS Maryland Water Science Center) discusses the importance of monitoring sediment transport related to dam removal. Matt Collins (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) describes

Attribution: Water Resources
video thumbnail: Multi-agency coordination leads to successful dam removal, Simkins Dam, Patapsco River Maryland
March 22, 2011

Multi-agency coordination leads to successful dam removal, Simkins Dam, Patapsco River Maryland

Faith Fitzpatrick (U.S. Geological Survey) and Serena McClain (American Rivers, Director, River Restoration) discuss the history of how the dam removal became possible. Allen Gellis (USGS Maryland Water Science Center) discusses the importance of monitoring sediment transport related to dam removal. Matt Collins (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) describes

Attribution: Water Resources
video thumbnail: Ecosystem restoration in the Chesapeake Bay headwaters, Severn River Tributary, Anne Arundel County Maryland
March 21, 2011

Ecosystem restoration in the Chesapeake Bay headwaters, Severn River Tributary, Anne Arundel County Maryland

Faith Fitzpatrick (U.S. Geological Survey), Hala Flores (Anne Arundel County Department of Public Works), Ronald Bowen (Anne Arundel County Department of Public Works), and Keith Underwood (Underwood and Assoc.) talk about stream restoration projects associated with Anne Arundel County's new office complex. A 0.5- mile long series of sand seepage berms and bog wetlands

Attribution: Water Resources
video thumbnail: Stream restoration, sediment TMDLs issues, and riparian vegetation in urban gullies flowing into the Chesapeake Bay, Carriage Hills, Maryland
March 21, 2011

Stream restoration, sediment TMDLs issues, and riparian vegetation in urban gullies flowing into the Chesapeake Bay, Carriage Hills, Maryland

Faith Fitzpatrick (U.S. Geological Survey), Keith Underwood (Underwood and Assoc.), Erik Michelsen (South River Federation), and Joe Berg (BioHabitats, Inc.) discuss how a degraded headwater ephemeral gully in a residential area was retrofitted with sand seepage and step-pool systems to reduce erosion and improve water quality as well as aquatic and riparian habitat. Trees

Attribution: Water Resources
video thumbnail: Special stormwater outfalls (bubblers) used in stream restoration projects to reduce erosive energy, Carriage Hills Outfall, Maryland
March 21, 2011

Special stormwater outfalls (bubblers) used in stream restoration projects to reduce erosive energy, Carriage Hills Outfall, Maryland

Faith Fitzpatrick (U.S. Geological Survey) and Joe Berg (BioHabitats, Inc.) describe bubble up inlet structures that help to reduce erosive energy for stormwater outfalls where they discharge into rehabilitated streams.

Attribution: Water Resources
video thumbnail: Protection of urban headwaters during residential development, Jabaz Branch, Severn, Maryland
March 21, 2011

Protection of urban headwaters during residential development, Jabaz Branch, Severn, Maryland

Faith Fitzpatrick (U.S. Geological Survey), Keith Underwood (Underwood and Assoc.), and Joe Berg (BioHabitats, Inc.) discuss regenerative stormwater conveyance, sand seepage berms, and swales used in new "green" residential developments to protect important trout habitat in downstream areas.

Attribution: Water Resources
USGS CoreCast
July 15, 2010

Shaken, Not Stirred--3.6 Earthquake in Maryland

This morning the Washington D.C. Metro area was awakened by a 3.6 magnitude earthquake which struck near Germantown, Maryland and was widely felt throughout the region. We spoke with Mike Blanpied, of our Earthquake Hazards Program, about the details related to this event, why it was felt so widely, and what people can do to prepare around the region.

Attribution:
Image: Vegetation Buffer Around Maryland Pond
July 3, 2007

Vegetation Buffer Around Maryland Pond

A strip of primarily native vegetation restored around a small private pond in Garrett County, Maryland, to act as a runoff buffer and to provide habitat for wildlife.

Attribution: Ecosystems
Image: Vegetation Buffer Around Maryland Pond
July 3, 2007

Vegetation Buffer Around Maryland Pond

A strip of primarily native vegetation restored around a small private pond in Garrett County, Maryland, to act as a runoff buffer and to provide habitat for wildlife.

Attribution: Ecosystems
March 22, 2007

PubTalk 3/2007 — Impact!

Piecing together the story of a giant meteorite crater beneath the Atlantic coast

By David S. Powars, Geologist, and R.D. Catchings, Geophysicist

  • Buried under Chesapeake Bay is a very well preserved impact structure 56 miles across and more than 2 miles deep
  • Following clues from drill holes and seismic imagery, careful
USGS
October 10, 2018

Internship: Response of a tidal brackish marsh to global change...

Response of a tidal brackish marsh to global change drivers: an ecosystem level manipulation of warming and elevated carbon dioxide

The "Best Report" for 2014 is "Hydrogeologic characterization and assessment of bioremediation of chlorinated benzenes and benzene in wetland areas, Standard Chlorine of Delaware, Inc. Superfund Site, New Castle County, Delaware, 2009-12"

Hydrogeologic characterization and assessment of bioremediation of chlorinated benzenes and benzene in wetland areas
Filter Total Items: 198
Image: Methane Seeps along Offshore Virginia
June 16, 2016

Recent scientific work has confirmed the source, composition and origin of methane seeps on the Atlantic Ocean seafloor, discovered in 2012, where scientists never expected them to be.

As US models predicted Hurricane Joaquin washed out a road at Kitty Hawk, NC in 2015.
June 1, 2016

New USGS models help predict storm effects on beaches

As the 2016 hurricane season opens, weather forecasters, emergency managers and coastal residents have access to tools developed by the U.S. Geological Survey that predict, more precisely than ever, where beach erosion and beachfront flooding will take place during hurricanes and other storms.

 

Image: Chesapeake Bay osprey chicks mostly healthy despite toxic exposure
April 4, 2016

The world's largest breeding population of ospreys is coping well with the long-lasting residues of toxic chemicals that were banned decades ago but remain in the Chesapeake Bay food chain at varying levels, such as the pesticide DDT and insulating chemicals known as PCBs.

collage of scientists conducting science related to each mission are
March 14, 2016

Much of the coast from Maine to Virginia is more likely to change than to simply drown in response to rising seas during the next 70 years or so, according to a new study led by the U.S. Geological Survey.

Visualize Your Water EPA logo
January 13, 2016

Today, the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announce Visualize Your Water, a citizen science challenge for high school students who live in the Great Lakes basin and Chesapeake Bay watershed. 

Screenshot of portal entry page
October 2, 2015

As the path of Hurricane Joaquin continues to move farther offshore, making landfall in the U.S. less likely, U.S. Geological Survey coastal change experts say there’s still a high probability of dune erosion along parts of the Atlantic coast, from the North Carolina Outer Banks to Cape Cod.

USGS science for a changing world logo
August 10, 2015

BALTIMORE -- Forests worldwide are vulnerable to growing risks of drought- and heat-induced tree mortality and forest die-off because of a rapidly warming Earth, according to just-published research in the scientific journal Ecosphere. The paper is an invited “ESA Centennial Paper” to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Ecological Society of America.

USGS science for a changing world logo
August 10, 2015

BALTIMORE -- This year, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey will present their research at the 100th annual Ecological Society of America (ESA) meeting from Aug. 9-14, 2015, in Baltimore, Maryland. The theme is "Ecological Science at the Frontier: Celebrating ESA’s Centennial." ESA is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization of scientists founded in 1915 to promote ecological science.

USGS
June 29, 2015

Interior Department’s Northeast Climate Science Center has released a report today synthesizing the latest information on the vulnerability of species and ecosystems to climate change in a 22-state region in the Northeast and Midwest U.S.

Maryland - Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

Maryland -  Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

5522 Research Park Drive
Catonsville, MD 21228

Phone: 443-498-5500
Fax: 442-498-5510

MD-DE-DC Water

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

12100 Beech Forest Road
Laurel, MD 20708-4039

Phone: 301-497-5000

Patuxent Research