Unified Interior Regions

Maryland

Maryland's water supply comes from streams, rivers, groundwater and reservoirs. Many of these systems flow to the Chesapeake Bay, the Nation's largest estuary. This complex ecosystem has been degraded due to the impact of human-population increase. The MD-DC-DE Water Science Center studies the impacts this has on water quality, habitats and biological communities.

Maryland Water

Maryland - Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

Maryland -  Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

5522 Research Park Drive
Catonsville, MD 21228

Phone: 443-498-5500
Fax: 442-498-5510

MD-DE-DC Water

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

12100 Beech Forest Road
Laurel, MD 20708-4039

Phone: 301-497-5000

Patuxent Research

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

The "Best Report" for 2014 is "Hydrogeologic characterization and assessment of bioremediation of chlorinated benzenes and benzene in wetland areas, Standard Chlorine of Delaware, Inc. Superfund Site, New Castle County, Delaware, 2009-12"

Hydrogeologic characterization and assessment of bioremediation of chlorinated benzenes and benzene in wetland areas
Filter Total Items: 205
USGS science for a changing world logo
February 18, 2004

Slow-moving ground water slows down water-quality improvements in Chesapeake Bay Ground water supplies about half of the water and nitrogen to streams in the Chesapeake Bay watershed and is therefore an important pathway for nitrogen to reach the bay, according to a recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) study. Too many nutrients, most of all nitrogen, are the principal cause for poor water-quality.

USGS
February 18, 2004

Slow-moving ground water slows down water-quality improvements in Chesapeake Bay Ground water supplies about half of the water and nitrogen to streams in the Chesapeake Bay watershed and is therefore an important pathway for nitrogen to reach the bay, according to a recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) study. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 3, 2004

 

Because of an increasing awareness of the critical role of ground water in sustaining coastal populations, economies, and ecosystems, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has recently published a report that describes ground water conditions in freshwater and saltwater environments along the Atlantic coast. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 18, 2003

The U.S. Geological Survey today warned state and federal agencies about the increased potential for landslides in the mountainous regions of Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania and New York due to rainfall from Hurricane Isabel.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 18, 2003

The U.S. Geological Survey today warned state and federal agencies about the increased potential for landslides in the mountainous regions of Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania and New York due to rainfall from Hurricane Isabel.

USGS
September 18, 2003

The U.S. Geological Survey today warned state and federal agencies about the increased potential for landslides in the mountainous regions of Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania and New York due to rainfall from Hurricane Isabel.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 10, 2003

The USGS has just completed a geologically based assessment of the technically recoverable, undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Appalachian Basin Province. This area includes parts of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama.

USGS
April 10, 2003

The USGS has just completed a geologically based assessment of the technically recoverable, undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Appalachian Basin Province. This area includes parts of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama.

USGS science for a changing world logo
January 22, 2003

 

 

Canus, a one-winged whooping crane instrumental in re-establishing this endangered species as part of the United States Geological Survey’s (USGS) captive breeding program, died last weekend of natural causes at the agency’s Wildlife Research Center in Patuxent, Maryland. 

USGS
January 22, 2003

Canus, a one-winged whooping crane instrumental in re-establishing this endangered species as part of the United States Geological Survey’s (USGS) captive breeding program, died last weekend of natural causes at the agency’s Wildlife Research Center in Patuxent, Maryland. 

USGS
December 9, 2002

The wild whooping crane that had been shot in Kansas and transported to the USGS-Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel, MD, for recovery, died overnight. The endangered bird was being treated for shotgun wounds, including a broken wing, and a respiratory condition.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 28, 2002

Coal provides more than half of our Nation’s electrical energy needs. For more than three centuries, coal has been mined in the Appalachian Basin, one of the most important coal producing regions in the world. This area includes parts of Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Kentucky, Virginia, Maryland, and Tennessee. Almost all of the coal now mined in the Appalachian Basin is used in eastern state

Maryland - Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

Maryland -  Delaware - Washington D.C. Water Science Center

5522 Research Park Drive
Catonsville, MD 21228

Phone: 443-498-5500
Fax: 442-498-5510

MD-DE-DC Water

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

12100 Beech Forest Road
Laurel, MD 20708-4039

Phone: 301-497-5000

Patuxent Research