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Filter Total Items: 186
Swiftcurrent Glacier from Trail 2013 in color.
Date Published: April 11, 2016

Swiftcurrent Glacier from Trail

Swiftcurrent Glacier from Swiftcurrent Trail. Glacier National Park.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Sperry Glacier Mid View 2008 in color.
Date Published: April 11, 2016

Sperry Glacier Mid View

Repeating Elrod’s photograph from the same photo point was impossible since he shot from the elevated perspective of the glacier’s surface. The terminus of the glacier has retreated beyond the field of view, but these images give a sense of the glacier’s extent and mass early in the 20th century.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Sperry Glacier Panorama 2008 in color.
Date Published: April 11, 2016

Sperry Glacier - Panorama

The 1913 image of Sperry Glacier shows the thickness of the glacial ice that once covered the Sperry basin. Now, at approximately 1/3 of it's maximum area, Sperry Glacier continues to recede at a rapid rate. It is one of the glaciers that USGS scientists are monitoring as a benchmark glacier.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Sperry Glacier from Comeau Pass 2009.
Date Published: April 11, 2016

Sperry Glacier from Comeau Pass

The expanse of Sperry Glacier that once greeted hikers facing NE on Comeau Pass is in stark contrast to the bedrock and vegetation that has since emerged as the ice retreated. The Marble image, most likely taken in the 1920s or early 1930s, was featured on a postcard with this caption: " Sperry Glacier from the river."

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Sperry Glacier 2001.
Date Published: April 11, 2016

Sperry Glacier

The northwest portion of Sperry Glacier once spanned Comeau Pass to the base of Edwards Mountain.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Shepard Glacier 2005 in color
Date Published: April 11, 2016

Shepard Glacier 1913 - 2005

Shepard Glacier from Pyramid Peak, Glacier National Park.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Shepard Glacier 2005.
Date Published: April 11, 2016

Shepard Glacier 1911 - 2005

Shepard Glacier in Glacier National Park. The red line on the 2005 image illustrates glacier retreat from 1911 to 2005.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Sexton Glacier 1901.
Date Published: April 11, 2016

Sexton Glacier

Sexton Glacier from bench below Siyeh Pass, Glacier National Park.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Piegan Glacier 1998
Date Published: April 11, 2016

Piegan Glacier

Piegan Glacier is one of the few glaciers in Glacier National Park that has not significantly changed since photographed in the 1930s.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Red Eagle Glacier 2009.
Date Published: April 11, 2016

Red Eagle Glacier

Although the 2009 photo location does not exactly match the historic photo station, a comparison of relative glacial coverage can still be made. Logan Glacier is in the foreground, while Red Eagle Glacier sits beneath the pyramidal peak that bears the same name. It appears that these two glaciers were joined at the time the historic photo was taken, but recessed into their own basins as time...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Bighorn sheep in Glacier NP.
Date Published: April 10, 2016

Bighorn Sheep in and near Glacier National Park

USGS collected GPS data as well as genetic and other samples on over 100 bighorn sheep east of the Continental Divide in Glacier National Park, Waterton National Park, and the Blackfeet Reservation. Bighorn sheep across the west are vulnerable to disease such as pneumonia. We are therefore working to improve our understanding of bighorn sheep movements, approaches for monitoring bighorns, and...

Contacts: Tabitha Graves
Wide eyed elk in a feedgrounds.
Date Published: April 9, 2016
Status: Active

Ecology of Elk on Department of Interior Lands in Southwest Wyoming

Between 2005 and 2010, we radio- collared 61 female elk (Cervus elaphus) on Fossil Butte National Monument and 12 female elk near Cokeville, Wyoming, slightly northwest of the Monument, all from the West Green River herd. We are using the 209,250 locations from these elk to identify seasonal distribution patterns, evaluate habitat use, and assess factors influencing the timing of migration.  ...

Filter Total Items: 247
It requires heavy machinery to remove snow and debris along the road. In this image, crews are removing 20+ feet of snow from th
April 6, 2016

Heavy equipment remove snow and debris from Going-to-the-Sun Road.

It requires heavy machinery to remove snow and debris along the road. In this image, crews are removing 20+ feet of snow from the Rim Rock area near Logan Pass along the Goin-to-the-Sun Road.

Avalanche forecasters ski out to investigate the crown of a large wet slab avalanche in Haystack Creek drainage. This drainage i
April 5, 2016

Haystack Creek avalanche

Avalanche forecasters ski out to investigate the crown of a large wet slab avalanche in Haystack Creek drainage. This drainage is one of the largest avalanche paths affecting the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park.  

March 15, 2016

Mange in Wolves of Yellowstone National Park

This video describes USGS research utilizing remote thermal imaging cameras to study the extent and impact of mange on wolves in Yellowstone National Park.

Image: Hidden Lake in Glacier National Park, Montana
March 14, 2016

Hidden Lake in Glacier National Park, Montana

Hidden Lake in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA, a high mountain lake in an alpine setting. This lake is kept full of water mainly from precipitation runoff from the surrounding hills and, in the spring, from snowmelt.

Image: Shepard Glacier, Glacier National Park, Montana - 1913
March 14, 2016

Shepard Glacier, Glacier National Park, Montana - 1913

Well-defined boundaries and crevasses are apparent in this photo of Shepard Glacier when its mass filled the cirque in 1913. (W.C. Alden)

Image: Shepard Glacier, Glacier National Park, Montana - 2005
March 14, 2016

Shepard Glacier, Glacier National Park, Montana - 2005

The thick, crevassed, ice flows of historic Shepard Glacier have been diminished to less than 0.1 square kilometer in area by 2005. According to the criteria set by the USGS Repeat Photography Project, Shepard Glacier is now considered to be too small to be defined as a glacier. (Blase Reardon)

February 23, 2016

Fitting a radio collar

Biologists with IGBST and the National Park Service fit a grizzly bear with a radio collar.  Once a bear is radio collared, biologists can track its movements with telemetry.

Grizzly released from trap
February 23, 2016

Grizzly released from trap

After the grizzly bear recovers fully from the anesthesia, it is released back into the wilderness.  

February 23, 2016

Telemetry by air

Once a grizzly bear is radio collared, biologists can track its movements with telemetry via airplane.  The IGBST also used the latest telemetry technologies, which allows downloading of GPS data from the radio collar via satellites.

February 23, 2016

Culvert trap

Biologists place a culvert trap in locations that they need data from.  Field crews will set up the culvert trap and check it daily, usually in the morning, to determine if a bear has been captured.  Additionally, trap doors are checked via radio telemetry. 

February 23, 2016

Telemetry by foot

Once a grizzly bear is radio collared, biologists can track its movements with telemetry on foot.   

Filter Total Items: 122
USGS
December 16, 2002

The USGS has just completed an assessment of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and natural gas resources in five geologic basins in the Rocky Mountain region.

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 20, 2001

The U.S. Geological Survey has named Dr. Michael J. Mac as the new Director of the Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC) in Columbia, Mo.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 18, 2001

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is participating in nine of the 14 public workshops scheduled by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) this fall. The Corps of Engineers is conducting the workshops and a series of hearings to receive public comment on their recently released Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement to the Master Water Control Manual for the Missouri River system.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 14, 2001

 

May 14, 2001 – The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS), Yellowstone National Park and the University of Utah have signed an agreement to establish the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory to strengthen long-term monitoring of earthquakes and the slumbering volcano beneath Yellowstone National Park. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 8, 2001

Federal, state and local policy makers will gather in Casper, Wyoming, on May 9-10 to examine science issues associated with the development of coalbed methane. The two-day conference and field trip, sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), will examine a number of topics including: what is coalbed methane, how it forms, where it occurs, how it is developed, and consequences of development.

USGS science for a changing world logo
January 17, 2001

Metal concentrations were found to be elevated in riverbed sediments and fish tissue samples at sites downstream from significant natural mineral sources associated with hard-rock mining activities in the Clark Fork and Spokane River basins, according to scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Department of the Interior.

USGS
January 17, 2001

Metal concentrations were found to be elevated in riverbed sediments and fish tissue samples at sites downstream from significant natural mineral sources associated with hard-rock mining activities in the Clark Fork and Spokane River basins, according to scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Department of the Interior.

USGS
May 18, 2000

In a ground-breaking study that used DNA from bear hair to count bears without having to see them or to capture them, U.S.Geological Survey researchers have preliminary results showing that there are an estimated 437 grizzly bears in the northern third portion of the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem and an estimated 332 grizzly bears in Glacier National Park itself.

USGS
March 16, 2000

Lecture on ground-breaking genetic sampling of GRIZZLY BEARS in Glacier National Park, Montana

USGS
November 10, 1999

U.S. Geological Survey scientist Katherine Kendall has received the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Superior Service Award for her outstanding leadership in the study of grizzly and black bears in Glacier National Park, Mont. and the surrounding area.

USGS
July 21, 1999

U.S. Geological Survey scientist Dr. Thomas J. Roffe received the Department of the Interior’s Superior Service Award for his outstanding contributions to wildlife health and natural resources management in the Greater Yellowstone Area during a recent meeting of the Greater Yellowstone Interagency Brucellosis Committee.

USGS
July 14, 1999

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientist, Dr. Daniel Fagre, received the Department of the Interior’s Superior Service Award for his outstanding leadership of the Global Change Research Program in Glacier National Park, Montana.