Unified Interior Regions

New York

Located in the Northeastern United States, New York is the seventh-most densely populated state in the U.S. The state covers 54,555 square miles and ranks as the 27th largest state by size. The Great Appalachian Valley dominates eastern New York and contains the Lake Champlain Valley as its northern half and the Hudson Valley as its southern half. Much of New York State borders water.

New York Water Science Center

New York Water Science Center

425 Jordan Road
Troy, NY 12180-8349

Phone: (518) 285-5695
Fax: (518) 285-5601

New York Water

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 352
Date published: April 14, 2016

Flood Science- Northeast Region Capability Team

One of the critical roles that USGS personnel play in their day-to-day activities is to respond in a timely and professional manner to floods that can occur at any time of the year and for a variety of reasons. The Flood Science Capability Team examines the cause and effect...

Date published: April 13, 2016

Understanding Coastal Change

Scientists perform a range of studies that document, assess, and model coastal change, risk, and vulnerability. Studies include historical shoreline change, the geologic structure and history of coastal regions, sediment supply and transport, sea-level rise, and how extreme storm events affect rates and impacts of coastal change.

Date published: April 13, 2016

Geologic Hazards and Catastrophic Events

We study the distribution and hazard potential of coastal and submarine events such as earthquakes and submarine landslides and associated tsunami potential, hurricane induced coastal inundation, extreme storms, sea-level rise and oil and gas spills. We also model development to help evaluate and forecast coastal hazard probability and occurrence.

Date published: April 13, 2016

Ocean Resources for America's Needs

Our scientists conduct research studies focused on geologic mapping, sampling and understanding of mineral and energy resources and studies of the geologic setting and processes to inform renewable energy development offshore.

Date published: April 13, 2016

Coastal and Marine Ecosystem Science

We bring together multidisciplinary expertise focused on developing tools and models to improve understanding of how healthy ecosystems function as well as how they respond to environmental changes and human impacts including ecosystem restoration. Research studies address coral reef, coastal wetland, benthic habitat and groundwater resources.

Date published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Predicting the Long-Term Impact of Hurricane Sandy on Spatial Patterns of Wetland Morphology in Salt Marshes of Jamaica Bay, New York

USGS scientists are working with collaborators to understand how Hurricane Sandy impacted wetlands in Jamaica Bay, New York. 

Date published: March 18, 2016
Status: Active

Assessing Occurrence and Persistence of Emerging Contaminants in Groundwater

Problem : Occurrence and persistence of emerging contaminants in groundwater flow in Suffolk County, New York Objectives: This project will monitor groundwater from selected SCWA supply wells for compounds indicative of anthropogenic sources, which are of increasing public concern. Approach: Groundwater-flow information, well-construction details, and distance from treated wastewater (...

Date published: March 18, 2016
Status: Active

Surface-Geophysical Surveys and Well Network for Monitoring Aquifer Salinity in the Genesee River Valley, Livingston County, New York

Background and Problem The Retsof salt mine in the Genesee River valley, Livingston County, New York flooded after roof collapses in 1994 created two rubble chimneys in overlying bedrock that intersected a confined aquifer in the basal glacial-drift deposits (figs. 1 and 2). Groundwater flowed downward through the rubble chimneys causing widespread drawdown in the lower confined aquifer until...

Contacts: John Williams
Date published: March 14, 2016
Status: Active

GLRI Edge of Field Watershed Monitoring Project

Problem: The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) was established to accelerate ecosystem restoration in the Great Lakes by confronting the most serious treats to the region, such as nonpoint source pollution, toxic sediments, and invasive species. Much of the effort associated with GLRI is being placed near the most impacted areas in the Great Lakes Basin. Priority Watersheds have bee...

Contacts: Brett Hayhurst
Date published: March 8, 2016

Hurricane Sandy

Over 160 of our scientists, technicians, and specialists responded to Hurricane Sandy by deploying field equipment and capturing information both before and after the storm. Our Sandy Science Plan identifies major research themes that will guide research to continue the support of the recovery activities.

Date published: March 1, 2016
Status: Active

Hydrogeology and Simulation of Groundwater Flow in Fractured Rock in the Newark Basin, Rockland County, New York

Groundwater in the Newark basin aquifer flows primarily through discrete water-bearing zones parallel to the strike and dip of bedding, whereas flow perpendicular to the strike is restricted, thereby imparting anisotropy to the groundwater flow field. The finite-element model SUTRA was used to represent bedrock structure in the aquifer by spatially varying the orientation of the hydraulic...

Contacts: Richard Yager
Date published: February 5, 2016
Status: Active

Stony Clove Basin Sediment and Turbidity Monitoring

Problem Suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) and turbidity are primary water-quality concerns in New York City’s (NYC) water-supply system (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2007). In the NYC water-supply system turbidity is largely caused by clay and silt rather than organic material (Effler et al. 1998, Peng et al. 2002, 2004). Sediment can originate from the watershed land surface and...

Filter Total Items: 240
Date published: July 1, 2017

Long Island Depth to Water Viewer 2010

USGS collects groundwater data at varying measurement frequencies to monitor the hydrologic conditions on Long Island, New York. Each year during April and May, the USGS conducts a synoptic survey of water levels to define the spatial distribution of the water table and potentiometric surfaces within the three main water-bearing units underlying Long Island.

Date published: June 6, 2017

New York Peak Flows

Locations (depicted as orange dots) in New York State where the New York Water Science Center has records of maximum recorded stages and discharges.

Date published: June 4, 2017

Water Quality Watch New York

Water Quality Watch provides access to real time water-quality data collected in surface waters throughout the United States as part of the USGS mission to describe water resources. Measurements include streamflow (through WaterWatch) water temperature, specific conductance, pH, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, and nitrate. 

Date published: March 17, 2017

Hurricane Sandy Beach Response and Recovery at Fire Island, New York: Shoreline, Beach Profile Data, and Breach Shoreline Data: October 2012 to September 2016

As part of the USGS Hurricane Sandy Supplemental Fire Island Study, the beach is monitored periodically to enable better understanding of post-Sandy recovery.

Date published: February 15, 2017

Current Conditions for New York: Streamflow

Current Conditions for New York: Streamflow 

Date published: February 13, 2017

Current Conditions for New York: Estuaries

Current Condtions for New York's estuaries

Date published: February 12, 2017

Current Conditions for New York: Groundwater

 Real-time groundwater data in New York

Date published: February 11, 2017

Current Conditions for New York: Water Quality

Real-time data for water quality in New York

Date published: February 10, 2017

Current Conditions for New York: Precipitation

Data from rain gages that provide real-time data are relayed to the USGS and are transmitted from each station at  hourly intervals. Real-time data available on these web pages are provisional data that have not been reviewed or edited.

Date published: January 1, 2017

Texture Model: Grain Size Distribution on Long Island

Texture model developed from grain size distribution from analysis of deep boring data

Date published: January 1, 2017

Data used for assessing relationships between fish assemblages and acid-base chemistry in streams of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, 1993-2014

Fish community richness, density, and biomass for entire communities, Brook Trout, Rainbow Trout, and minnows, including site characteristics, and water chemistry (acid neutralizing capacity, pH, nitrate, sulfate, ammonia, calcium, and total aluminum) collected at least once and as many as 13 times at each of 52 stream sites during the same years that fish were inve

Date published: January 1, 2017

Adirondack New York soil chemistry data, 1997-2014

This dataset contains measurements of chemical concentrations of forest soil samples and associated site measurements collected in the Adirondack Ecoregion of New York State. Data are presented in four groups (tabs) in an Microsoft EXCEL 2013 spreadsheet (and comma-delimited CSV files): (1) Adirondack Sugar Maple Project (ASM), (2) Buck Creek North Watershed, (3) B

Filter Total Items: 389
boat filled with equipment for monitoring water quality
April 12, 2016

Mohawk Water Quality boat

Mohawk River Water Quality boat

2 people dressed in cold weather gear in boat on a river
April 12, 2016

Collecting a sample on the Mohawk River/Barge Canal in Rome, NY

Dan Edwards (USGS) and Elizabeth Mosher (NYSDEC) collect a sample on the Mohawk River/Barge Canal in Rome as part of the TMDL/RIBS pilot USGS/NYSDEC collaboration in the Mohawk River Basin.

A red fox trots across the beach on Fire Island
April 11, 2016

A red fox trots across the beach on Fire Island

A red fox trots across the beach on Fire Island with dunes and waves in the background

man and woman in orange pfd suits using water sampler on river
April 11, 2016

Water sampling on Mohawk River

Taking water samples on Mohawk River 

Scientists on a beach use sediment coring equipment (a tall aluminum barrel and motor to vibrate the barrel into the ground)
April 10, 2016

Collecting a sediment vibracore on the beach in Fire Island, NY

We collect terrestrial (barrier island) and marine (nearshore and estuarine) sediment cores to ground-truth geophysical observations. These cores are used to understand the history of barrier island formation and erosion.

Winter nor’easters eroded sediments from an artificial dune and moved them seaward to the beach and shoreface
April 9, 2016

Winter nor’easters eroded sediments from an artificial dune

Though often less intense than hurricanes, extratropical storms (e.g., nor’easters) occur more frequently and their impacts can be striking. Here, several years after Hurricane Sandy, winter nor’easters eroded sediments from an artificial dune at Fire Island, NY and moved them onto the beach and shoreface. Such erosion created a steep vertical face, or scarp.

R/V Kaho
March 28, 2016

R/V Kaho

The Research Vessel Kaho

Maps showing (A) acoustic backscatter and (B) bathymetry collected with the inteferomentric sonar
December 31, 2015

Maps showing (A) acoustic backscatter and (B) bathymetry

Maps showing (A) acoustic backscatter and (B) bathymetry collected with the inteferomentric sonar

Photo collage of researchers on personal watercraft at Fire Island
December 31, 2015

Photo collage of researchers on personal watercraft at Fire Island

Personal watercraft were utilized to collect bathymetry in the surf zone and shore face (top left), setup on the beach (top right), instrument configuration (bottom left) and Pelican case hardware configuration (bottom right).

USGS' Owen Brenner wading with GPS backpack
December 31, 2015

Wading in the breach to precisely measure it

USGS employee Owen Brenner walks across the Fire Island wilderness breach carrying a GPS backpack that allows him to collect precise elevation data in the shallows.

orange geophysical surveying equipment on city street and in truck
December 31, 2015

Geophysical Surveying

Geophysical Surveying on city street in New York

New York Water Science Center

New York Water Science Center

425 Jordan Road
Troy, NY 12180-8349

Phone: (518) 285-5695
Fax: (518) 285-5601

New York Water