Unified Interior Regions

Vermont

Vermont, located in the New England region in the eastern United States comprises 9,614 square miles and is the 45th-largest state. Lake Champlain, the major lake in Vermont, is the sixth-largest body of fresh water in the U.S. and separates Vermont from New York in the northwest portion of the state.The state contains 2,000 higher plant species and 75 different types of natural communities.

New England Water Science Center - New Hampshire/Vermont

New England Water Science Center - New Hampshire/Vermont

361 Commerce Way
Pembroke, NH 03275-3718

Phone: (603) 226-7800
Fax: (603) 226-7894

New England Water

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 70
USGS
October 30, 2008

A previously undescribed, cold-loving fungus has been linked to white-nose syndrome, a condition associated with the deaths of over 100,000 hibernating bats in the northeastern United States. The findings are published in this week's issue of Science.

USGS
May 9, 2008

Investigations continue into the cause of a mysterious illness that has resulted in the deaths of thousands of bats since March 2008. At more than 25 caves and mines in the northeastern U.S, bats exhibiting a condition now referred to as "white-nosed syndrome" have been dying.  

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 25, 2006

Many private ground-water wells in New Hampshire and Maine may have arsenic at concentrations close to or above Federal safety standards for public water supplies. A recently released study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) shows the likely locations of elevated arsenic.

USGS
May 25, 2006

Many private ground-water wells in New Hampshire and Maine may have arsenic at concentrations close to or above Federal safety standards for public water supplies. A recently released study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) shows the likely locations of elevated arsenic.

USGS science for a changing world logo
November 7, 2005

As the spectacular New England fall foliage gives way to another of the region's infamous winters, many wonder what this year will bring. Long-time residents think winter just isn't what it used to be in New England.

USGS
November 7, 2005

As the spectacular New England fall foliage gives way to another of the region's infamous winters, many wonder what this year will bring. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 13, 2005

If you live near the shore of Lake Champlain and ever wondered how much the lake level has changed over the last century, or what the water temperature is today, at the push of a button you can find out by visiting the new Weather Station exhibit on the waterfront at ECHO at the Leahy Center for Lake Champlain in Burlington, Vermont. 

USGS
October 13, 2005

If you live near the shore of Lake Champlain and ever wondered how much the lake level has changed over the last century, or what the water temperature is today, at the push of a button you can find out by visiting the new Weather Station exhibit on the waterfront at ECHO at the Leahy Center for Lake Champlain in Burlington, Vermont. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 23, 2003

 

New England’s historic long, harsh winters are often the stuff of legends from long-time residents who swear the weather was worse when they were young. It turns out they may well be right. Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have found evidence in the region’s rivers that lends credence to the notion that the winters were once longer.

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 23, 2003

Modern wastewater treatment, environmental protection laws, road de-icing salts, and the shift from an agricultural to an urban-based society have resulted in significant changes during the past hundred years in the water quality of three major rivers in New England, according to a report released by the U.S. Geological Survey. 

New England Water Science Center - New Hampshire/Vermont

New England Water Science Center - New Hampshire/Vermont

361 Commerce Way
Pembroke, NH 03275-3718

Phone: (603) 226-7800
Fax: (603) 226-7894

New England Water