Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

Filter Total Items: 29
Date published: May 7, 2019
Status: Active

Sublethal Effects of Contaminants in Aquatic Food Webs—Research Challenges and Considerations for Future Studies

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and academic scientists partnered to identify challenges and provide considerations for future scientific study designs to advance our understanding of the often subtle sublethal effects of contaminants on individuals, populations, communities, and entire aquatic food webs. 

Contacts: Kelly Smalling
Date published: April 14, 2019
Status: Active

GLRI Urban Stormwater Monitoring

The GLRI Urban Stormwater Monitoring effort brings together the expertise of the USGS with local and national partners to assess the ability of green infrastructure to reduce stormwater runoff in Great Lakes urban areas.

Date published: April 12, 2019
Status: Active

Edge-of-field monitoring

Edge-of-field monitoring focuses on identifying and reducing agricultural sources of excess nutrients which can threaten the health of streams, rivers, and lakes. Edge-of-field monitoring assesses the quantity and quality of agricultural runoff and evaluates the effectiveness of conservation practices that aim to reduce nutrient loss.

Date published: March 26, 2019
Status: Active

Assessing stormwater reduction using green infrastructure: Gary City Hall (Gary, Ind.)

The effectiveness of green infrastructure (rain gardens and decreased impervious surfaces) at reducing stormwater runoff is being assessed at a redevelopment project at Gary City Hall (Gary, Indiana). This study will evaluate pre- and post-construction hydrologic conditions using data collected by monitoring storm-sewer flow, groundwater levels, soil moisture, and meteorological conditions....

Contacts: David C Lampe, Brenda Scott-Henry
Date published: March 25, 2019
Status: Active

Assessing stormwater reduction using green infrastructure: Niagara River Greenway Project (Buffalo, NY)

The effectiveness of green infrastructure (porous asphalt, planter boxes, rain gardens, and the removal of impervious pavements) at reducing stormwater runoff is being assessed at the Niagara Street redevelopment project in Buffalo, New York. This study will monitor pre- and post-construction storm-sewer flow, groundwater levels, evapotranspiration, precipitation, and soil moisture.

Contacts: Brett Hayhurst, Valerie E Shao, Julie Barrett O'Neill
Date published: March 24, 2019
Status: Active

Assessing stormwater reduction through green infrastructure: RecoveryPark (Detroit, Mich.)

The effectiveness of green infrastructure (including urban land conversion and bioswales) at reducing stormwater runoff is being assessed at RecoveryPark, a redeveloped urban farm in Detroit, Michigan. This study will monitor pre- and post-construction storm-sewer flow, groundwater levels, precipitation, and potential evapotranspiration.

Contacts: Christopher J Hoard, Stephanie Beeler, Ralph Haefner, Danielle Green, Bill Shuster, Donald Carpenter, Gary Wozniak
Date published: March 23, 2019
Status: Active

Edge-of-field monitoring: Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI)

Great Lakes Restoration Initiative edge-of-field monitoring focuses on identifying and reducing agricultural sources of excess nutrients which threaten the health of the Great Lakes. The USGS supports these efforts by utilizing edge-of-field monitoring to assess the quantity and quality of agricultural runoff and evaluate conservation practices that aim to reduce sediment and nutrient loss....

Date published: January 11, 2018
Status: Active

Supporting Lake Partnerships

USGS supports Federal, State, and local and Tribal partner agencies with implementing aspects of Great Lakes Lakewide Action and Management Plan (LAMP) goals involving restoration and protection of the Great Lakes. This support includes coordination with Tribal natural-resources departments, USEPA, and other Federal, State, and local agencies. USGS scientists and managers participate in...

Contacts: Jon Hortness
Date published: January 11, 2018
Status: Active

Birds as Indicators of Contaminant Exposure in the Great Lakes

Story Map: Utilizing Tree Swallows as Indicators for Contaminants in the Great Lakes Area

Use tree swallows and colonial waterbirds in the Great Lakes to evaluate contaminant

  1. Exposure (geographic and spatial);
  2. Trends through time(temporal)
  3. Effects (
  4. ...
Date published: January 11, 2018
Status: Active

Development of Chemical Tools to Control Asian Carp and Dreissenid Mussels

Over 180 and 140 aquatic invasive species (AIS) have been introduced into the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River basins, respectively, with threats of new invasions always on the horizon. Sea lamprey, zebra mussels, and Asian carps are just a few examples of AIS whose abilities to alter aquatic habitats and disrupt food cycles threaten many outdoor recreation opportunities and ecosystems...

Contacts: Mark Gaikowski
Date published: November 21, 2017
Status: Active

Cooperative Science and Monitoring Initiative (CSMI)

Since 2002, environmental organizations from the United States and Canada have teamed up each year to assess conditions in one of the five Great Lakes. This program is called the Cooperative Science and Monitoring Initiative (CSMI). Each year, the survey focuses on a series of research areas, such as phosphorus and nitrogen input and movement through the food web, phytoplankton and zooplankton...

Contacts: Jon Hortness
Date published: November 15, 2017
Status: Active

Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)

The USGS collaborates with local, state, federal, tribal, university, and industry partners to conduct the science necessary to understand the causes and effects of toxic HABs and inform water management and public health decisions. USGS is characterizing the life cycle of HABs, their asociated toxins, and the genes responsible for cyanotoxin production. This work is enhancing the ability of...

Contacts: Jon Hortness