Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

Filter Total Items: 64
Date published: March 26, 2020
Status: Active

Invasive Phragmites Science: Management Tools for the Control of Invasive Phragmites to Foster the Restoration of the Great Lakes

The USGS is developing innovative Phragmites control measures to keep this rapidly spreading invasive plant from further expanding its range into new wetland habitats and to aid in the development of successful restoration strategies. Scientists are conducting studies and field tests to determine if fungi that live within the Phragmites are enabling the plant to take over...

Date published: March 26, 2020
Status: Active

Invasive Phragmites Science: Great Lakes Phragmites Collaborative

Addressing a large-scale regional issue such as controlling a persistent invasive plant like Phragmites requires broad cross-sector coordination. Little progress is made and cost efficiencies are reduced when each entity works independently.  The highly successful Great Lakes Phragmites Collaborative builds collaboration and facilitates communication on a regional level with a common...

Date published: March 25, 2020
Status: Active

Aquatic Native Species and Habitat Restoration: Custodial Maintenance of Fish Spawning Reefs

To ensure the long-term viability and function of constructed fish spawning reefs in the St. Clair-Detroit River System (SCDRS), periodic maintenance and repair of the reefs are required. To remove sediment from reefs, researchers developed a portable pressurized water jet that can be deployed by a small vessel. Reef cleaning experiments were conducted during late summer and fall of 2018, with...

Date published: March 25, 2020
Status: Active

Foundations for Future Restoration Actions: Cooperative Science and Monitoring Initiative - Lake Ontario, 2018

Environmental organizations from the United States and Canada have teamed up each year, as part of the Cooperative Science and Monitoring Initiative (CSMI) program, to assess conditions in one of the five Great Lakes. . Each year, the survey focuses on a series of research areas, such as phosphorus and nitrogen input and movement through the food web, phytoplankton and zooplankton populations...

Contacts: Brian Lantry, James Watkins, Christopher M. Pennuto, Jacques Rinchard, Ph.D.
Date published: March 25, 2020
Status: Active

Nutrient Monitoring: Detroit River Monitoring

The Detroit River is a major contribution of flow to Western Lake Erie. However, difficulty in estimating the phosphorus load from the river has led to uncertainty in the phosphorus budget in Lake Erie. To reduce this uncertainty the USGS, in cooperation with the USEPA through GLRI, have begun depth and width integrated water-quality sampling of the Detroit River. The results of this sampling...

Date published: March 25, 2020
Status: Active

Areas of Concern: Development of St. Louis River AOC Remedial Targets for Mercury

The St. Louis River Area of Concern (SLRAOC) was designated in 1987 owing to the presence of a variety of legacy pollutants, including mercury. Elevated fish-mercury levels lead fish consumption advisories by both Minnesota and Wisconsin, which resulted in Beneficial Use Impairments (BUIs).

Date published: March 25, 2020
Status: Active

HABs: Characterizing Zones of High Potential Nutrient Cycling in Agricultural Catchments

River sediments have the capacity to remove nutrients from the water column which lowers the nutrient load to downstream water bodies. The objectives of this project were to characterize rates of sediment nitrogen removal and phosphorus retention in river networks draining agricultural watersheds and to assess how land use and land management actions affect these rates. This information is...

Date published: March 25, 2020
Status: Active

Urban Best Management Practices: Reporting Reductions of Untreated Urban Runoff as a Result of GLRI-funded Urban BMPs

The objectives of this project are to quantify reductions in the volume of urban stormwater runoff through implementation of green infrastructure practices, model stormwater characteristics to further explore our understanding of the hydrologic functions performed by green infrastructure and assess how green infrastructure may help or hinder sequestration of chloride from application of...

Date published: March 25, 2020
Status: Active

Areas of Concern: Effects of Contaminants of Emerging Concern on Avian Biota in the Great Lakes

The objectives of this work are to evaluate whether there is compelling evidence that Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs) are eliciting adverse effects in Great Lakes fish and wildlife.  A second objective is to develop efficient strategies and develop endpoints to survey for, and monitor threats, that CECs may pose before those threats become large scale impacts on Great Lakes ecosystems...

Date published: March 25, 2020
Status: Active

Aquatic Native Species and Habitat Restoration: Cisco Spawning Habitat Assessment

Cisco (formerly known as Lake Herring) Coregonus artedi are native shallow water coregonines which were formerly very abundant in the Great Lakes and provided large commercial fisheries and healthy prey to native piscivores.  In most areas outside of Lake Superior, cisco abundance is greatly reduced and in Lakes Ontario and Erie they are uncommon to rare.

Date published: March 25, 2020
Status: Active

Agriculture Best Management Practices: Quantification of In-Stream Phosphorus and Sediment Storage and Transport - Linking Land Use and Landscape Best Management Practices with Downstream Transport in Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Priority Watersheds

As part of a coordinated effort with University of Minnesota (UMN) and US Forest Service (USFS), USGS will conduct sediment and phosphorus source tracking in two agricultural watersheds -- specifically corn and soybean production -- of Black Creek and Plum Creek, tributaries to the Maumee and Fox Rivers, respectively.

Date published: March 25, 2020
Status: Active

Foundations for Future Restoration Actions: Accelerated Development of a Robot-assisted Computer Vision System to Quantify Round Goby, their Habitat and Prey

Scientists are developing and testing an underwater robot-assisted vision system to help address many Great Lakes Restoration Initiative priorities related to lake bottom environments.