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January 11, 2022

An eruption at Kīlauea's summit began at approximately 3:20 p.m. HST on September 29, 2021. Lava activity is currently confined within Halema‘uma‘u crater, in the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

HVO scientists collect detailed data to assess hazards and understand how the eruption is evolving at Kīlauea's summit, all of which are shared with the National Park Service and emergency managers. Access to this hazardous area is by permission from, and in coordination with, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

Color photograph of lava lake surface
A close up of the surface texture on the active lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. The classic zig-zag pattern in apparent in the incandescent spreading zones between crustal plates that form on the surface of the lava lake. USGS photo by M. Patrick.
Color photograph of lava lake
Despite several brief pauses over the past month, lava lake activity continues in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. Lava is erupting from the west vent, which has built a steep spatter cone. The active lake is perched slightly above the surrounding solidified lava. USGS photo by M. Patrick.
Color photograph of lava lake margin
A close up of the perched levee impounding the active lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. Photo taken on January 10, 2022, from the south rim of Kīlauea caldera. USGS photo by M. Patrick.
Color photograph of spatter cone
A close up view of the spatter cone over the west vent, in Halema‘uma‘u crater at the summit of Kīlauea. This photo was taken on January 10, 2022, from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists monitor the eruption from within the closed area with NPS permission. USGS photo by M. Patrick.