Photo and Video Chronology - Kīlauea - January 25, 2017

Release Date:

Lava continues to stream out of tube at Kamokuna ocean entry

 

Lava continues to stream out of tube at Kamokuna ocean entry...

A steady stream of lava exiting the episode 61g lava tube pours into the ocean at the Kamokuna ocean entry. The interaction between the lava and ocean water causes explosive reactions, throwing bits of lava (seen in the photo at the base of the lava stream).

(Public domain.)

Since the delta collapse on December 31, 2016 there has not been an...

Since the delta collapse on December 31, 2016 there has not been any evidence of the lava delta rebuilding. The fume trace of the 61g tube system on the coastal plain is visible up slope from the ocean entry. The cove in the sea cliff (at center) is where the ~4 acre portion of old sea cliff collapsed into the ocean after the delta fell in. The new public lava viewing area and rope line is in the lower right, and the emergency access road is just inland from the coast.

(Public domain.)

Misty weather created a double rainbow over Pūlama Pali and the 61g...

Misty weather created a double rainbow over Pūlama Pali and the 61g flow field. Fume trace from the tube can be seen at bottom center.

(Public domain.)

A close up of the lava stream pouring out of the tube and directly ...

A close up of the lava stream pouring out of the tube and directly into the Pacific Ocean.

(Public domain.)

This video clip shows the lava stream - about 1-2 m or yards wide -...

This video clip shows the lava stream - about 1-2 m or yards wide - pouring out of the tube into the Pacific Ocean, triggering pulsating explosions that are throwing bits of lava onto the top of the sea cliff.

(Public domain.)

This thermal image shows the Kamokuna ocean entry. Two plumes of h...

This thermal image shows the Kamokuna ocean entry. Two plumes of hot (scalding) water branch out from the entry point. The lava stream itself is the very hot feature right of center. Just above the lava stream, about 10 meters (yards) behind the sea cliff, is a narrow line of high temperatures that appears to be a hot crack. This hot crack suggests that the sea cliff around the entry point is unstable and has the potential to collapse.

(Public domain.)