Report provides volcanological context for 19th century artwork.

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In this new USGS Open-File Report, artwork is matched with the approximate date and volcanological context of the scene, showing eruptions at Kīlauea and Mauna Loa in the late 19th century.

Painters of early Hawaiian volcano landscapes created art that formed a cohesive body of work known as the "Volcano School." Jules Tavernier, Charles Furneaux, and D. Howard Hitchcock were probably the best known artists of this school and their paintings can be found in galleries around the world.

Many of these masterpieces are preserved in the Museum and Archive Collection of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. In this new USGS Open-File Report, the artwork is matched with the approximate date and volcanological context of the scene, showing eruptions at Kīlauea and Mauna Loa in the late 19th century. While art does not depict scenes with perfect fidelity, the detail, scope, and vivid colors portrayed by artists of the time still moves and informs. For these reasons, volcano art from this period continues to be used in modern USGS publications and is a subject of interest for volcano scientists. Learn more about the events behind the art in Volcano Art at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park—A Science Perspective.

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